Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

2

After conducting extensive research on the Bitlocker platform, I believe I can answer my own question. Key reference: Bitlocker Drive Encryption Technical Overview In our default setup (at least on MS Surface Pro 3), Bitlocker, UEFI and Secure Boot are on. There is TPM 2.0 enabled. The UEFI is not password protected, and the boot order allows USB before ...


2

Physical access is always a very risky thing. While I don't now of any security flaws right now that will give you immediate access there are a lot of other things that you can do, eg. using a USB keylogger to intercept the user's password when he uses the machine the next time. There have been attacks using PCI cards utilizing direct memory access ...


2

UEFI secure boot ensures that the UEFI firmware loads and executes only signed UEFI applications (including bootloaders) and drivers. So an attempt to modify them by introducing a malware would be detected and rejected. A vulnerability or malware (including rootkits) could possibly be also signed in the loaded code or the components loaded next. Can a ...


1

First, there's a terminology issue when talking about this stuff. Strictly, 'BIOS' and 'UEFI' are different programming interfaces for the firmware present on PC motherboards. However, in a PC context, 'BIOS' is often used to refer to the firmware irrespective of its API -- that is, "UEFI BIOSes" should strictly read "UEFI firmwares". (Just to be clear: ...


1

Software cannot protect against physical attacks. Security requires a layered approach. Most cases have the ability to put on a physical lock. More secure systems cases can also hide the cable connections and prevent changing keyboards, or other peripheral connections. The BIOS/boot password is only one part of a greater security plan for a system. It's ...


1

I recommend locking down GRUB and taking away access to the GRUB shell. GRUB manual: Authentication and authorisation (Archived here.) By default, the boot loader interface is accessible to anyone with physical access to the console: anyone can select and edit any menu entry, and anyone can get direct access to a GRUB shell prompt. For most systems, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible