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Already before UEFI, infected firmware could do what it wanted, including spying on you. What changed, is that UEFI now has a network stack, making writing payloads much easier. Also, if you have attackers with physical access, you have already lost.


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Actually, this varies by Linux distro implementation: http://firmwaresecurity.com/2015/07/17/secure-boot-strength-varies-by-linux-implementation/ So, these signed images will get you more security on distros which value security over convenience. Thanks, Lee http://firmwaresecurity.com/feed/


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Well... if attacker had physical access, then they'd probably find UEFI easier to hack than BIOS. UEFI is a more complex OS than BIOS was. An attacker could add a background Runtime Service that watched you and phoned home. An attacker could also do that with BIOS, they'd just have to hook interrupts. You can use Intel's CHIPSEC and the UEFItool to dump your ...


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Secure Boot is one security technology, it is not complete. There can be attacks before Secure Boot, Intel created Boot Guard for that. Read this Apress book for better understanding of the various Intel silicon and firmware technologies: http://firmwaresecurity.com/tag/isbn-978-1-4302-6572-6/ Also, Secure Boot varies in strength by OS, see: ...


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There is an entire literature in the Blackhat and Defcon communities showing how to exploit the software that manages TPMs, retrieve secret keys from the TPM by interposing on the communication between the TPM and the CPU, and other attacks. The answer above by Kevinze and his followup comments are simply not accurate (he/she argues that such exploits are ...


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BIOS and UEFI are both different system firmware solutions. BIOS was designed back when MS-DOS was main OS, so there was no concept of security built-in. EFI 1.x also basically had no security. UEFI 2.x had Secure Boot, signed code, uses TPM or TrustZone, and has other security features. But, both solutions can have vulnerabilities. UEFI is more complex than ...


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Another usage of passwords in firmware: UEFI has a network stack, and to do PXE it may use authentication (CHAP?). IPSec is also available. So some network usage of UEFI will require a login/password. UEFI has a User Identification driver model, and UEFI 2.5 also added smartcard driver models. HTH, Lee http://firmwaresecurity.com/feed



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