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The cat ~/.ssh/authorized_keys command shows you the authorized_keys file of the currently logged in user. When logged in as root, or using sudo, this will give you the authorized_keys file of the root user. The authorized_keys file, at least on Ubuntu, is usually owned by the user. So the currently logged in user (root or not) can see it. The .ssh ...


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You can transform the PDF into uncompressed form using pdftk. Most metadata will then be immediately visible (and removable, provided you repair the file with pdftk afterwards). Same goes for "non-immediately-PDF" code (you can see that with tools such as PDFid). You can for example easily alter the trailer where fields such as /ID are to be found: /Info ...


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What you are looking for is called "redaction". I am not aware of any "cheap" redaction tool for Unix. Depending on your documents, you will need a PDF viewer anyway, because if you have images, redaction will be visual (and you always should visually check your documents while redacting). That said, I could see three possibilities: a) Adobe Acrobat ...


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You should stick with /dev/urandom. Thomas Hühn has a good overview at http://www.2uo.de/myths-about-urandom/ If you are really concerned you can look at using a user space CSPRNG. Stick with well understood CSPRNGs (e.g. Blum Blum Shub, although it has some performance issues) and respected implementations. You might want to read ...


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RC4 has its flaws and arc4random specifically had some issues about 7 years ago (CVE-2008-5162) yet it is expected to be secured Also, note that urandom is not the best idea or as Wikipedia says: A counterpart to /dev/random is /dev/urandom ("unlimited"[5]/non-blocking random source[4]) which reuses the internal pool to produce more pseudo-random bits. ...



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