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As well as malware, as already indicated in Evander Consus's answer, the risks include being compromised by any of the cross-domain exploits should any vulnerabilities exist on sites you trust and are possibly logged into: e.g. Cross-site scripting. Cross-site request forgery. Session fixation i.e. Client-site attacks on the sites you use. See the ...


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What risks do you have? Possibly that your computer is now infected with malicious software like a virus or a trojan horse. The following steps should be taken if you didn't already. What to do? There are some steps you can take: First of all, don't click on links that you don't trust or know Use unshortenit.it or urlex.org to check where the ...


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If you look at the page source, there is a JavaScript function rwt() executed on onmousedown event. <a href="http://security.stackexchange.com/" onmousedown="return rwt(this,'','','','1','AFQjCNHano0MrEGop-Wp0eV_bNhmdh7OtQ','H4np7JuYNqsCuTIjB-78Eg','0ahUKEwjzldecwZfNAhWEVxoKHX8OAnwQFggdMAA','','',event)"> Information Security Stack Exchange</a>...


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They are abusing the script https://linkedin.com/slink which is an "open redirect". When someone posts a link on Linkedin, the website automatically converts it to an URL which uses the slink-script with an unique code for that URL. When a user clicks on that link, the script forwards the user to the actual URL. The purpose of that layer of indirection is ...



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