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Something that has not been covered is in case of disk failure (intentionally or not). Many companies/etc may dispose drives (USB or not) in many different ways. There is always a risk when disposing such devices, as some information may be recovered from them (that is why its important to nuke them in case they failed or --bleach-- them if you want to reuse ...


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They largely use the same physical storage type and protocols, however a hard drive usually stays in its computer. USB thumb drives are designed to be plugged into different computers, making them an obvious target for malware spreading. In a corporate/organizational environment, there's also the risk of people copying data that should be kept in the ...


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It's silly logic, but they may consider flash drives to be a bigger risk because they're easier to lose. Neither should be considered secure, unless they're fully encrypted.


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There's several reasons why an IT department might limit the use of external storage to a specific set of drives. Ownership. The company owns the drive, which stays within the company and is used for work purposes. If an employee uses a thumb drive they also use for personal business, they may unintentionally infect a system. Where did the drive come ...


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There is no practical difference in terms of security (data exfiltration or infection possibilities) of the device internals as the other answers already noted. One important factor not taken into consideration in your question is whether the organisations you mentioned encourage use of any device or only the units designated and provided by the IT ...


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The two concerns that IT departments have with flash drives are: They are vectors of infection. They can be used to exfiltrate data from the company's secure network. Regarding infection, the size of the drive is unimportant. Either it has bad data on it or it doesn't. If you are talking about USB-specific attacks such as BadUSB, then all that matters ...


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There is no difference From your computer point of view, both disk are the same kind. There are some little differences in how information is deleted, but it should not matter regarding prohibition. A Flash Drive will usually have a smaller capacity, but if they were concerned about leaks, several gigabytes allow for losing a lot of information. Maybe ...


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I can personally reccomend this software; http://www.fileshredder.org/ It is free and it works great, it also has various options for number of times a bit is to be overwritten (it does include templates for several acknowledged standards from DoD etc.) It works on HDD's and USB's a like and, best of all, is free. It is Windows only though, I can not see ...


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Encrypt a large picture of noise such that the file size occupies most of the drive. Do the same for a medium sized picture and then a small picture. Copy the large picture to the drive and if you have any room left over copy the smaller pictures to it. Avoid copying the same file to the drive more than once. Repeat the process with new pictures of noise. ...


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The answers already in provide some good technical advice on how to go about doing what you propose while minimizing risk to whatever machine you would be using to attempt the sanitization (ie. run a live distro of a different operating system type than was on your friend's infected computer, preferably after physically removing or disconnecting the normal ...


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Referring to my answer to this question (before it was migrated): No, scanning the drive without "opening the folder" isn't a secure way to protect against viruses on the drive. It's very risky to insert what you believe to be a compromised USB device into your PC, no matter what AV you have installed. If you desperately need files from the drive (to quote ...


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Depends on what it has on it. There are some attacks and malware which affects the signals that the device sends to the computer - most famously the BadUSB attacks, which let flash drives claim to be input devices - in which case merely plugging a device in could allow it to do things ranging from the annoying (hitting enter at random) to the malicious ...


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It depends. I older times there was an autostart facility when inserting a data DVD/CD-ROM or USB stick but on modern systems this is usually no longer active by default. It might still be possible to corrupt the file system on a stick in a way which causes code execution when the system tries to access the device. And there are USB sticks with a writable ...



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