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1

(Quick answer, I don't have the time to research all I remember and double-check my facts.) There are multiple things to consider here: USB sticks may carry payload that you do not know is there, e.g. a virus to infect the computer it's plugged in to. Things like BIOSes, network cards, etc. can often be flashed to upgrade the firmware. You could also ...


9

Actually quantum computers are not that much a threat for symmetric encryption. To put it in simple (and somewhat simplistic) terms: A quantum computer, if it ever exists, will totally break the most used asymmetric encryption and key exchange algorithms (RSA, ElGamal, Diffie-Hellman...) but not all asymmetric algorithms (QC does not break the concept of ...


3

I have used a similar method in the past: I had a plain-text file containing my credentials and encrypted this with the Blowfish cipher. Now I use KeePass, an offline password manager. I strongly recommend it, as it is Much more user friendly than an encrypted text file, and Much more secure than a text file encrypted just once (N = 1, see below). KeePass ...


-1

A good encryption method like AES or RSA is more than enough. Nothing is 100% secure, but using RSA-1024 or RSA-2048 should be enough.


0

In windows you can replace 'utilman.exe' with 'cmd.exe' using a windows installer media. Boot into repair mode and open up a command prompt, CD into C:\, go to system32, backup the exe's and replace utilman with cmd. Restart your computer, click the "ease of access" button down in the left corner, suddenly, a wild CMD prompt appears with admin rights. Now ...


1

To avoid infection from storage devices, don't execute any files from them, and configure your operating system to not do so automatically. But storage devices aren't the only threat in form of USB. For example, take a look at this USB keyboard: "But that's not a keyboard! That's a USB thumb drive!" Are you sure? "Of course! I can tell a keyboard apart ...


2

One good practice you should follow to avoid getting infected from USBs is to disable the Autorun functionality in all of your computers. If I recall correctly, Windows 7 and 8 have Autorun disabled by default for all devices except CD and DVDs, although the slightly different Autoplay function can still be used on USB devices. You can find a quite thorough ...


-2

Don't connect a promiscuous USB device(s) to your machine. This practice is guaranteed and the only way to prevent "being infected" from such, Oh, and works every time it's tried. TNO PERIOD!


1

It depends on what security features you are looking for; specifically, how much you mistrust your own computer. If you just need the decryption key to reside on a USB device, then you can put a key file on a basic USB flash drive, and use GnuPG. The key will of course make it to the main computer, because the computer will do the actual decryption work. ...


1

Password Reset Key seems to contain a modified Windows PE OS. I think it is something similar to PCUnlocker Live CD/USB drive. It's not a completely new thing. There are many freeware such as Rufus, ISO2Disc which allows you install a Windows OS on a USB drive.



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