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1

Considering its trivial to get a free signed SSL cert, I wouldn't even mess with self-signed certs. It builds bad habits in users and is just asking for trouble. http://www.startssl.com/


1

When you have secure(!) contact with all of your users over a different medium, you can send them the root certificate of your own certificate authority which you used to sign the certificate of your website and give them instructions how to add it to the list of trusted certificates of their web browser (or maybe even a handy install script which does it ...


1

Edit: The question author made significant edits to their question after this answer was posted. This answer is based on an earlier version of the question which gave the impression that they were asking about a usual public website. You can not explain that a self-signed certificate is fine, because on a public website it is not! The other question you ...


3

So how can I ensure that when I send a user to my server, and they are confronted with the "self-signed certificate" warning, they are able to decide for themselves whether to trust it or not, instead of having to believe the skewed picture that their software paints for them? If you are not using pre-defined trust anchors (e.g. the root CA of the ...


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The Best approach (for the use case of a limited user group and a personal website) I use is to have a non secured page somewhere where my users can download the root certificate (my own CA) and find instructions how to install that into there trust store. this way the computer can trust my 'self-signed' certificate. one of the headaches with this approach ...



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