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1

In general, yes this is a safe configuration. The VirtualBox host only network appears as a network adapter on your host operating system. You should make sure the firewall rules are applied to that network. For example, on Windows you can do this from "Windows firewall with advanced security". The screenshot below shows that VirtualBox Host-Only Network, ...


0

A good analogy to your question would be airport security. There are only a limited number of entry points which a person can use to enter a secure area. But is the secure area really secure? Consider this: Airport employees and such do not go through the rigorous screening that passengers go through before entering the secure area or boarding a plane. ...


3

Under the premise that the system is so well-secured that there is only one person which can connect to it via network, then file permissions do not really matter anymore. The operating system can only enforce them against local users anyway. When an attacker can not log into the system or influence some public service running on the machine to do their ...


1

First of all, it should be noted that virtualization is not a security measure in any way. This is an infrastructure / application technology, and it won't protect you from being compromised. Generally speaking, using chmod 777 to address application issues (log writing, cache etc.) is not a viable solution. You might want to understand what is going wrong ...


2

Bitlocker with Active Directory integration is probably best for Windows Server 2012. Your primary problem with FDE on servers is the requirement for boot time passwords with things like Becrypt, TrueCrypt, PGP. Boot time passwords generate extra work for your network ops. Encrypting inside the VM is usually unnecessary. What are you defending against? ...


0

There are some theoretical risks (which have not been proven yet) that would make the dual-boot approach less secure. These involve offloading a trojan onto a non-standard piece of hardware. For instance, infecting the battery's firmware with something that will then overflow the kernel's power manager. That could cross reboot boundaries and you don't ...


6

Unfortunately the previous answers given to this question, are not only wrong, but also quite dangerous. While it is certainly true that digital signatures usually involve hash functions, which by its nature are inherently deterministic, you should note that digital signatures are more than just a simple hash. They involve public key cryptography, which is ...


4

Signing with RSA in OpenPGP is deterministic and thus does not require a source for randomness as you described correctly. Hashing the data to be signed is deterministic as long not padded with a random seed (see @Karol Babioch's answer for details why one might want to do so), signing the hash also is. Detailed discussion of the parts involved: RSA ...



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