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1

The Short answer to this is Yes, its insecure. To explain, you must first understand what a Bridge is. A bridge in it's simplest definition is connecting two or more networks together. I would say this basic concept has been muddied since bridging to a layperson has been obfuscated by "All in one" devices. What you are essential doing is mapping the ...


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To be honest, as far as information security is concerned, any device connected to the Internet is vulnerable. Microsoft is correct in saying so. Imagine a scenario where you have multiple internal network nodes that communicate only internally. You decide to open up just one port on one node in the network to freely communicate with the external internet. ...


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No, because /dev/random gathers environmental noise from device drivers. So unless you happen to have exactly the same events happening at the exact same time in both VMs, their random pool will differ enough to make this kind of attack impossible (or at least infeasible).


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Supported options will depend on your service provider. Any encryption of drives etc only protects the data when it is not being accessed / used. There is no practical encrypted processing at the moment; so if you are ever accessing / processing the decrypted files at the service provider, any intelligence agency with access to the data center, or the ...


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They aren't perfectly secure, as demonstrated with this exploit: VENOM, CVE-2015-3456, is a security vulnerability that impacts some common computer virtualization platforms, notably Xen, KVM, VirtualBox, and the native QEMU client. This vulnerability may allow an attacker to escape from the confines of an affected virtual machine (VM) guest and ...


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Excluding a hash collision (possible but unlikely/difficult) and someone altering your "secure" copy of the hash, I think you got it. You should, of course, run the hashes when the VM is shut down.


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There is no guarantee with any computational system that it can't be broken/manipulated. Here is a list of vulnerabilities in QEMU, its up to you to determine if your specific version is vulnerable or not, and how "easy" it is to be targeted. As a side note: we tend to avoid absolutisms in infosec because there usually is no guarantee of anything, what is ...



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