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The best environment I've found so far for Windows exploitation would have to be the OSCP labs (and you get a qualification at the end if you pass!). It is a big network with a fair mix of Windows and other OS's although it is dominantly Windows. As far as I'm aware there are none that exist, people have them though do not make them available due to ...


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There do seem to be these two uses of the term VPN. Obviously the most important bit is Privacy - and many people (myself included) can only accept privacy exists if there is encryption, but as R15 mentioned, MPLS providers typically call their service VPN but rarely have encryption enabled. They rely on routing segregation. It can be safe for some ...


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Yes it is possible but unnecessary in your case. People often use VMs to isolate potentially malicious applications from their main host and to have some sort of rewind button to restore the VM to a previous state in case something goes wrong in there, but looks like that's not what you want to do. To defeat forensics all you need is full disk encryption ...


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could you recommend what I should do to keep someone in computer forensics from finding any deleted files or files for that matter? Securely delete files, and erase over the empty space on your hard disk with a three-pass algorithm. There's a great guide for that here, on AskUbuntu. Technically you can recover stuff that has been passed with less than ...


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So I have some advice about the Networking side of things. Here's a nice little setup I use: The malware machine. Put it on an internal network adapter, and assign it a static IP address. Take note of the netmask and the gateway. The listener. Put it on the same internal network adapter as the first. Assign it the IP address of the malware machine's ...


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Yes and No .... But mostly no (Actually Hell no). Virtualisation systems such as workstation or virtualbox are type II hypervisors which run inside of your Host OS, as with a regular processes (like any other program). This means that they use the Host OS's services for things like; networking, outputting graphics, and your I/O devices such as your keyboard ...


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Yes, this approach will certainly help protect your host OS. As a matter of fact, it's an approach I take for most untrusted applications I use, including browsing untrusted web content. This however is not an absolute way of protecting your host system, it simply increases the attacker's workload substantially. And as a matter of fact there have been ...


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The National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition (CCDC) is a blue team competition that includes a Microsoft server and client. Not exactly CTF, but an information security competition with Windows nonetheless. Must be involved with academia to compete however.


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Just take a look at OpenVZ kernel changelogs -- there are regular (up to a few times per month) kernel releases, often with CVE fixes. Also, it's not 2.6.32 -- it's RHEL6 (which was based on 2.6.32 but moved forward a lot).



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