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Use a clean PC or VM for your VPN connection and never ever use that system outside of the VPN. A VM will only work if your host is clean. If you install free games or random software then you SHOULD NOT trust your PC anymore. Never login to accounts that you use outside of the VPN !!! Create separate accounts for any service you use over the VPN. Never ...


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Regardless of what virtualization technology you use. Once the attacker has access to the hardware, it's game over. In case of a VPS, even when encrypting the root partition, if the key is stored in memory and you have no control of the hypervisor, then you cannot protect your system's confidentiality with encryption. Administrators with access to the ...


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I don't think a keylogger has ability to do so. But monitoring the keyboard activity of a VM station from the host machine is possible (only with my own experience).


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It should not be able to, as keyboard press events (interrupts) will only be routed to the VM when the VM has focus. Any other time, the keyboard press interrupts will be handled within the host OS, and thus would not be visible to the VM. Of course, if you map your host keyboard as a raw device in the VM or otherwise redirect the interrupts, that would ...


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Your problem probably has nothing to do with viruses. If you can only access a specific domain, it may be that this one (for whatever reason) is inside your DNS cache but you can't reach any other site because your DNS server is unresponsive. I would start by using a network analysis utility (such as Wireshark) to determine whether DNS queries succeed or ...


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If the host machine has a damaged hosts file, any traffic going from the guest VM, through the host, will encounter this damaged hosts file before it accesses the internet. EVEN IF the guest is using a USB wifi adapter, it will still have to interact with the hosts host file.


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VM commands get redirected through the host OS. Some stuff may go direct to the CPU depending on what kind of virtualization support your system has, but that is still only granted at the will of the host OS. If the host OS is compromised, then the virus can potentially impact anything running within it, including a virtual other process. Sandboxing tries ...


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You might need to change some computer habits if you've been "pirated several times already", but to answer your question, yes it's definitely possible for a virus on your host to have adverse effects on a VM. The VM uses resources allocated to it by the host machine. If your Guest OS has direct access to your host file system for example, it's entirely ...


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The virtualization software and even the hardware can contain all kinds of bugs that would allow a guest program to access the host. There are already known malware that detects VMs and some may be able to use these vulnerabilities. Also don't bother about dual-booting or changing disks as virus/rootkits that attack BIOS are not even new. The only secure ...



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