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That sounds normal for a vm. You don't typically worry unless available entropy drops below that 100-200 average. The key measure is the sequences that come out of that entropy. You should use the ent program to test your random sequences. You worry when you start seeing tests fail here. This site has a good process for testing randomness. We can ...


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It all comes down to the network segmentation of the VM or container from your host operating system. If you have a guest virtual machine that contains a vulnerable operating system or an container that is hosting an application that is not properly maintained (i.e. patches), assuming that either of this two connect to your corporate network via a bridge ...


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Ostensibly, the answer is no. The architecture of most virtualisation platforms abstract the activity of the virtual 'guest' machine from that of the physical 'host' machine. There are, however, a couple of caveats to this: Primarily, you are reliant of the security of your virtualisation platform, the major players (VMware, Microsoft hyper-V, Oracle) all ...


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You dont have much to worry about regarding having your VM hijacked to attack the host of all the possible attacks thats really near the bottom of the list. Your outline above is pretty solid and would deter the majority of attackers (barring bots who will just hammer your system). If you want to throw an ips on there, check out snort (its fantastic). In ...


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I'd recommend Virtutech's SIMICS software. Note that Virtutech was bought by Intel and assigned to their subsidiary: Wind River. Simics is a SIMULATOR, which has important distinctions from an EMULATOR (like qemu). See http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1584617/simulator-or-emulator-what-is-the-difference for specifics on the differences. Simics simulates ...


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You first want to set up a host OS (Windows or Kali, whichever you prefer to use when you're not hacking.) Inside that host OS, install a virtual machine platform (VMware, VirtualBox, whatever you choose.) Inside the virtual machine control panel, create a first VM and install Kali, (presuming you want to use Kali for your pentest environment.) I would ...


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Running a kali VM provides some benefits: Restoration - It is easy to restore your machine when you mess it up. If you're playing around with security tools and/or malware, changes are good that, at some point, you will damage your operating system. Without a VM, you would have to reinstall everything from scratch; with a VM, you can save an image and ...



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