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The primary defense against vm escape attacks specifically is defense-in-depth. Specifically that if there are varied and plentiful defensive mechanisms in place that an attacker will trigger enough of them that the defender can stop the bad things from happening. Even if an attacker successfully breaks out of one vm in one hyper-visor, there can still be ...


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I think this needs to be broken down into smaller questions that can be reasonably answered. Can the a VM repeatedly access the same memory address quickly enough to trigger the row hammer effect? I see no reason why that would be impossible. It is certainly possible that something about the virtualized environment could end up interfering with that ...


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It depends on your adversary, though I will say no. At the moment, there are no known vulnerabilities for this attack vector. Thus, if your adversaries are script kiddies, then you are safe. It will be a box of chocolates (not knowing what you might get), thus a useless attack: A vulnerability likely might allow someone to read or modify a different ...


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Highly customized and patched hypervisors, sandboxes around said hypervisors to mitigate breakouts, and heavy monitoring. Of course, any given server only hosts so many VMs, so a breakout is fundamentally limited to a finite number of guests, if it's able to get past the protections outside the hypervisor. For example, QEMU can be compiled with a hardened ...


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As a developer of Kali, I can attest that this answer is very wrong. Kali is not insecure by default, and has the same security standards as Debian in a default installation. Kali is a Linux distribution aimed at Penetration Testing - as opposed to casual browsing or day-to-day computer activities - which is why some people prefer running it as a virtual ...


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In typical pentesting, Kali is just another tool, it's insecure by default, and is never recommended to be run as your primary OS without some serious baseline hardening. It's typically launched (as a virtual machine) when needed and "paused" or "stopped" when not. This helps keep your host (and files) protected. Additionally, Kali is known to have bugs ...


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How do software companies ensure that their product or app can only run in a given number of bare-metal or VM instances? They don't! Software companies start with some half-a**ed technologies that are incomplete solutions. These are then watered down so they don't break the user model too badly. In the end, the only thing that software licensing does is ...


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One system I've seen is to use dynamic license codes. Each time the software is run, it connects back to the vendor's server. It submits the current license code, and is issued a new one. The old license code is invalidated. If the VM is cloned, then only one clone will have the new license code. Drawbacks with this system: Internet access is required to ...


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There is never 100% security. There are vulnerabilities in web browsers which also work on Linux There is malware for Linux. Malware development is constantly evolving. While you are reading this there are hundreds of people thinking about new ways to get those systems under their control which still elude them. Just because you are not aware of any good ...


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I think you are taking the ransomeware threat to a whole new level. The key from you protecting yourself for such malware is awareness and keeping your programs updated to the latest version. Yes using a VM would help you and you will always be able to delete the VM if you are infected but why go through all that trouble when the key is awareness? Note: ...



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