Hot answers tagged

38

The same way you shop online without getting your CC details stolen. Buy from reliable vendors that have established reputations as legitimate businesses. Don't go places where they are trying to bait people in to generate bot nets and steal personal info. If a deal is too good to be true, chances are good that it is. That said, security also involves ...


18

Same way you can watch any other other website safely: Use a modern and updated browser. Do not download anything from a source you don't trust. Do not run media plugins like Flash and Java by default. Do not run media plugins like Flash and Java on a site that you don't trust, at all. Do not under any circumstance install or run Adobe Reader, it is ...


17

Set up an intermediate Tor VM, one side connected to outside, the other to a dedicated virtual network. Set up a porn watching VM (with tissues included), connected to the Tor VM via the dedicated network. After the VM #2 is fully set up, power it down and take a snapshot. Power it up. ??? After you've enjoyed all the great educational videos, power the VM ...


12

It's a myth that pornsites are more risky to use than other website when it comes to malware. A report published by Symantec in 2011 identified that you can get malware from pretty much any kind of website, even those which can be work-related for many professions. Pornsites did in fact rank lower than many other categories of websites. Most infections ...


9

When compromised you should re-install your machine completely. There is no way of knowing for sure that nothing else has been compromised.


7

You're not doomed, everything is gonna be okay. Pause Dropbox sync on all of the devices associated with this account. Turn off all of the devices that have Dropbox installed and associated with that account, and any other device that you know/suspect they're infected. Now that you know your files are okay on Dropbox, nuke all of the systems you've just ...


7

It is an unfortunate situation wherein virus infections are, by nature, insidious. Some infections can be cleaned; sometimes by using specific removal tools, sometimes with manual fiddling about with files and reg keys, sometimes using commercial AV products. Other times they intercept system calls and prevent detection or removal. The best advice, in the ...


7

Since according to your description all systems in your network are affected and independent from the operating system, the chances are high that your router is compromised and the DNS settings are changed. This way most outgoing traffic can be controlled by the attacker which leads to all these redirects to ads. This type of compromise is not uncommon as ...


6

If the machine is already infected, it is very difficult to know what is going on with it. You can never trust it anymore. The malware itself could be sitting in the memory and watching its files. It's certainly plausible that a malware would do that, specifically so it can regenerate the deleted files. Remember those autorun malware? Whenever you deleted ...


6

We had this in our network yesterday, after the network cable was unplugged from the back of the PC was when the crypto locker showed itself. So go around and unplug everyone's network cable and look at the desktop, you can't miss it. Also, the only way to deal with this is to pay the demand ransom of $300. After we paid, it said "processing, could take up ...


6

What you have there is evidence of an infection attempt, not a successful infection. It's not uncommon to have these types of files in the temp internet folder if they were not blocked by malware protection. However, you do need more evidence that the machine is clean before you consider NOT nuking it from orbit. Scans from a LiveCD (or boot-time scan), or ...


6

ClamAV belongs to Cisco and its Talos Group. Cisco acquired Sourcefire, the makers of Snort and ClamAV in late 2013. http://www.cisco.com/web/about/ac49/ac0/ac1/ac259/sourcefire.html http://www.talosintel.com/about/ http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/products/security/talos.html © 2004 - 2015 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Sourcefire ...


6

Yes, and there have been cases of this being stored in different areas on the computer one classic example can be found at the following URL: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2948092/security/hacking-teams-malware-uses-uefi-rootkit-to-survive-os-reinstalls.html This article goes into a little more detail on how this works http://arstechnica.com/security/...


5

Does your company have an IT team? If so the best thing to do is get them to do it or you could risk losing your internship. If not the next best thing if possible is to do a clean install of the operating system. If that's not possible try this out: From a clean machine download the latest MalwareBytes and AVG and CCleaner and put those installers on a ...


5

Viruses don't identify themselves as such. In fact, they often try to disguise themselves to make it difficult to detect them. Virus scanning software uses a variety of different techniques to figure out if a program looks like a known virus, but the exact methods they use and the things they look for vary from program to program. Since these virus ...


5

The simplest answer is because each anti-virus solution is coded differently. They're different pieces of software. It's expected that there should be differences, just as you'd expect differences between MS Office, OpenOffice and Star Office. Expanding on that, some anti-virus uses virus databases, which, in layman's terms, hold information about known ...


5

I think it's just a scary tactic from the site to make you download something that can be just an annoying adware to a very bad malware. It can be also a common method called Clickjacking where a user is tricked into clicking something which will then execute a malicious action or start a malicious download. Do you have any AV on your OS? Did your browser ...


4

I too, like s3x. Is nice. But, I don't watch a pr0n at work and suggest that you avoid this activities, especially if you cannot get a quickie along with it. However, if you still want a eye relief at work, I suggest the following: Get a sandboxing software like bufferzone pro or sandboxie. Run your browser from the sandbox. Delete the contents of the ...


4

Try installing sandboxie http://www.sandboxie.com/ and running your browser through it. Also enable the option when the last program closes to delete all the sandbox contents. I believe the free version should suffice. Naturally all the usual advice applies, get familiar with the software, take care of your antivirus etc and be extra cautious about what you ...


4

Antivirus compares known hashes of viruses to the hashes of your files. When the hashes match it blows the box and tells you about it. These companies operate their own databases for known malware hashes. Therefore one company may have a hash identified that another does not. A lot of malware is now generated on the fly by the attack site. Meaning it ...


4

Some background: The Zeroaccess rootkit/botnet is a multi-purpose, highly resilient bit of malware. It causes compromised devices to participate in click-fraud and mine Bitcoins. Compromised devices participate in a peer-to-peer Command and Control network, which makes the botnet resilient against takedown measures. Overall, it is a very clever bit of ...


4

A "sheep dip" station is one term - from the practice of dipping sheep in cleansing fluids before letting them near the rest of the flock.


4

In general and at the moment (2016), wipe and reinstall is usually enough for an ordinary user. But notice the qualifiers; malware authors are often quite clever and adapt quickly to new ideas. The issue underlying the question is, where can code that runs automatically, exist on a computer. The current answer to that is, in any device or component that ...


3

As a rule, any remotely sophisticated malware won't show up on any anti-virus, anti-spyware, or other anti-malware scan. Heaven only knows what else you have on your system beyond just what's showing up sending you ads. Your only truly safe option is to erase everything and start over. Or as you'll often see it stated here: Nuke it from orbit; it's the only ...


3

Basically: Signature is not yet in their databases. Look at Virustotal. Some recent malware are detected only by a few engines. Later, engines are updated by their respective companies and the detection rate rises.


3

Generally speaking, you are correct. Let's look at some exceptions: If the malware exploits a vulnerability in your email program. If the malware exploits a vulnerability in the software used to "unzip" it. If the malware exploits a vulnerability in the software used to view its contents (ie Windows Explorer). If the malware exploits a vulnerability in the ...


3

I figured it out! it's not virus Here is how i resolve it below: 1. open savefrom.net setting. 2. uncheck "Offers4U" feature. If you are curious, it's because Offers4U from savefrom.net extension done. i hope it helps. :)


3

Nuke from Orbit (TM) Replace your non-hardware. Wipe and reinstall everything. That takes care of any software rootkits. Use general good infosec hygiene to prevent reinfection. (E.g. install updates, only install from trusted sources, run antivirus. Air gap your network if you have to.) (Hardware) rootkits: don't worry. The short answer is: these tailor-...


3

You can plug your USB drive on a virtual machine based on Linux. Before that, you can stop the automatic mount of externals drives. After, you verify the recognition of your drive with:fdisk -l You note his path: /dev/sdX, don't mistake with another drive !!! You note his blocks count and their sizes (512 by default) You can erase all datas on the drive ...


2

It means that the virus signature isn't in their DB yet. I recommend you look for a antivirus that has the best detection rate.



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