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34

The same way you shop online without getting your CC details stolen. Buy from reliable vendors that have established reputations as legitimate businesses. Don't go places where they are trying to bait people in to generate bot nets and steal personal info. If a deal is too good to be true, chances are good that it is. That said, security also involves ...


17

Same way you can watch any other other website safely: Use a modern and updated browser. Do not download anything from a source you don't trust. Do not run media plugins like Flash and Java by default. Do not run media plugins like Flash and Java on a site that you don't trust, at all. Do not under any circumstance install or run Adobe Reader, it is ...


16

Set up an intermediate Tor VM, one side connected to outside, the other to a dedicated virtual network. Set up a porn watching VM (with tissues included), connected to the Tor VM via the dedicated network. After the VM #2 is fully set up, power it down and take a snapshot. Power it up. ??? After you've enjoyed all the great educational videos, power the VM ...


11

It's a myth that pornsites are more risky to use than other website when it comes to malware. A report published by Symantec in 2011 identified that you can get malware from pretty much any kind of website, even those which can be work-related for many professions. Pornsites did in fact rank lower than many other categories of websites. Most infections ...


9

When compromised you should re-install your machine completely. There is no way of knowing for sure that nothing else has been compromised.


7

It is an unfortunate situation wherein virus infections are, by nature, insidious. Some infections can be cleaned; sometimes by using specific removal tools, sometimes with manual fiddling about with files and reg keys, sometimes using commercial AV products. Other times they intercept system calls and prevent detection or removal. The best advice, in the ...


6

We had this in our network yesterday, after the network cable was unplugged from the back of the PC was when the crypto locker showed itself. So go around and unplug everyone's network cable and look at the desktop, you can't miss it. Also, the only way to deal with this is to pay the demand ransom of $300. After we paid, it said "processing, could take up ...


6

You're not doomed, everything is gonna be okay. Pause Dropbox sync on all of the devices associated with this account. Turn off all of the devices that have Dropbox installed and associated with that account, and any other device that you know/suspect they're infected. Now that you know your files are okay on Dropbox, nuke all of the systems you've just ...


5

What you have there is evidence of an infection attempt, not a successful infection. It's not uncommon to have these types of files in the temp internet folder if they were not blocked by malware protection. However, you do need more evidence that the machine is clean before you consider NOT nuking it from orbit. Scans from a LiveCD (or boot-time scan), or ...


5

If the machine is already infected, it is very difficult to know what is going on with it. You can never trust it anymore. The malware itself could be setting in the memory and watching its files. It's certainly plausible that a malware would do that, specifically so it can regenerate the deleted files. Remember those autorun malware? Whenever you deleted ...


4

Yakshemash ! I too, like s3x. Is nice. But, I don't watch a pr0n at work and suggest that you avoid this activities, especially if you cannot get a quickie along with it. However, if you still want a eye relief at work, I suggest the following: Get a sandboxing software like bufferzone pro or sandboxie. Run your browser from the sandbox. Delete the ...


3

Some background: The Zeroaccess rootkit/botnet is a multi-purpose, highly resilient bit of malware. It causes compromised devices to participate in click-fraud and mine Bitcoins. Compromised devices participate in a peer-to-peer Command and Control network, which makes the botnet resilient against takedown measures. Overall, it is a very clever bit of ...


3

The simplest answer is because each anti-virus solution is coded differently. They're different pieces of software. It's expected that there should be differences, just as you'd expect differences between MS Office, OpenOffice and Star Office. Expanding on that, some anti-virus uses virus databases, which, in layman's terms, hold information about known ...


3

Does your company have an IT team? If so the best thing to do is get them to do it or you could risk losing your internship. If not the next best thing if possible is to do a clean install of the operating system. If that's not possible try this out: From a clean machine download the latest MalwareBytes and AVG and CCleaner and put those installers on a ...


2

As a rule, any remotely sophisticated malware won't show up on any anti-virus, anti-spyware, or other anti-malware scan. Heaven only knows what else you have on your system beyond just what's showing up sending you ads. Your only truly safe option is to erase everything and start over. Or as you'll often see it stated here: Nuke it from orbit; it's the only ...


2

Basically: Signature is not yet in their databases. Look at Virustotal. Some recent malware are detected only by a few engines. Later, engines are updated by their respective companies and the detection rate rises.


2

Viruses don't identify themselves as such. In fact, they often try to disguise themselves to make it difficult to detect them. Virus scanning software uses a variety of different techniques to figure out if a program looks like a known virus, but the exact methods they use and the things they look for vary from program to program. Since these virus ...


2

In my view you cannot completely clean up virus from Win XP without re install. If you are not interested in that, I suggest you to install a good antivirus and initiate a boot-time scan.It will surely reduce the threat up to a limit. Best Antivirus Software Ratings


2

If you are worried about particular files, you can upload them to Virustotal so that they are checked by popular AV software. Keep in mind that sophisticated malware could detect that and remove itself from the file before it is uploaded, so that the AV scanner wouldn't find anything suspicious. Apart from that you can download free (check the license if ...


2

Try installing sandboxie http://www.sandboxie.com/ and running your browser through it. Also enable the option when the last program closes to delete all the sandbox contents. I believe the free version should suffice. Naturally all the usual advice applies, get familiar with the software, take care of your antivirus etc and be extra cautious about what you ...


2

A first point is that the files shall be copied under some protection. When you boot up an infected system, malware and virus present on the system may be activated, and then try to propagate, for instance into other files on an external hard drive. Infected files are said such because of their ability to "infect" computers which look at them. Precisely, a ...


2

Short answer: Yes, Nuke It From Orbit (rebuild the machine) Long answer: You're the only person able to accurately make that assessment. I'd say that the lower the importance of the machine, the less necessary it is to rebuild it. For example, if it's just an old laptop used only to play Angry Birds, and never used for anything of importance, ever, then ...


1

There's no sure-fire way to clean off persistent malware. Even if you seem to get rid of it the system may still be owned. Even if you are successful (and these days that is rare) it can take far more time to clean a system than to rebuild it, which is why IT departments don't even try anymore, they just blast on a new image. Truthfully, relatives ...


1

A good trick i use quite often if i'm worried about a file is to open it using this http://www.sandboxie.com/ it allows you to sandbox applications meaning it doesn't get access to you main disk, alternatively using a VM instead of your main OS for handling "suspect" files or even only using a VM for you important stuff can be useful. In terms of your flash ...


1

Since the nature of your question is more didactic than practical, the answer is simple: No, that process isn't useful. The malware designer/coder is smarter than you, he knows your operating system more than you, he spent hundreds of hours in his mother's basement (or his respective agency's labs) exploring the nooks and crannies. His whole job is to make ...


1

Is this process useful at all? For simple malware yes. Is there really a need for an anti-virus? yes because AV programs designed for this work and the AV's has especially methods to protect of your system. Should I have done the check-ups in Safe Mode? NO ! you must do this works with a live operating system (Boot disks such as Hiren's BOOT) ...


1

Antivirus compares known hashes of viruses to the hashes of your files. When the hashes match it blows the box and tells you about it. These companies operate their own databases for known malware hashes. Therefore one company may have a hash identified that another does not. A lot of malware is now generated on the fly by the attack site. Meaning it ...



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