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33

but the implication in the other question is that videos in question have been downloaded and played by media software on the target computer. No it is not. The implication is that there need to be a bug in the code handling the data. For instance the ffmpeg library is used in browsers like Chrome or Firefox and it had several serious bugs in the ...


19

Video files by themselves can not contain a "virus" in the classical sense but they can be used to exploits bugs in the media players (or sometimes even the OS) when handling the file formats and codecs. By using these exploits they can then execute code. Like most video players vlc also has/had lots of bugs which could be exploited, including in the ...


11

A web browsers video system is just another video player, so the same problems apply which were mentioned in the linked question. The smaller set of supported video codecs greatly reduces the attack surface, but doesn't make bugs in the decoders for these formats inconceivable. The Adobe Flash plugin is renowned for its plethora of security bugs in the past ...


10

Yes, VLC can be hacked. Here you can check CVE list of VLC. But don't panic, just because your VLC freeze, that doesn't necessarily ​mean that someone hacked you. Make sure that your VLC is up to date. Can you submit that file to this website Cuckoo Sandbox and then paste the report here, just out of curiosity let us see, what will heppen when that file is ...


9

The message means that Facebook has received some unusual requests from your computer, like for example a large number of attempts to guess passwords for different accounts or attempts to post spam. So Facebook assumes that you have some kind of malware on your computer and recommends you to install a malware scanner to get rid of it. For more information ...


5

The attack listed in the referenced question certainly would not work with VLC or Linux. VLC does not support the obscure Windows Media Player DRM it utilizes (at least not to my knowledge), and even if it did, the purpose of the attack is to trick you into downloading and running some Windows executable files. That being said, a different kind of attack is ...


4

None of the symptoms you posted is a sign of having malware on your computer. My internet connection slows to a crawl often Complain to your internet service provider or find a better one. my games keep crashing Viruses don't tend to do that. When you have problems running games, it's far more likely to be a problem with your graphic driver... or ...


4

An increasingly common attack is to use your Google Play Store credentials to force apps onto the device via the web page for the app. If you are seeing apps install automatically this is the likely source. In any event if you got malware on your phone, you really need to change your Google credentials and reset any 2fa tokens or app-specific passwords ...


4

Your computer is very likely not infected with any virus. Websites which claim that they just scanned your computer for viruses without your consent, found that is infected with something and you need to pay lots of money for some product is a scam which appears since the early 2000s and it's quite surprising that there are apparently still people falling ...


3

I'm afraid wiping the machine, changing all your passwords from another good machine, doing a fresh install from known good install media, and restoring the data (carefully) from backups really is the only solution guaranteed to clean your machine. In the trade we call this "nuke it from orbit", and the reason it is the only way to be sure is that you ...


2

You should be okay. It is one of the oldest tricks in the book. The practice is refereed to as Malvertising. The idea is to make it appear the machine is compromised or having issues. They then usually direct you to a fix or a recommended program. However those are actually the real malware. And they may be ransomware, adware, bots, a remote admin tool, or ...


2

You should NOT. First, you don't know if the file is trustable, you got it from some "source". It is never advisable to install APKs from untrustworthy sources, especially on your primary device. Second, it contains a known vulnerability. Third, it is an offline game, and it requires full internet connection(it may be because of ads, but you never know ...


2

Drive-by downloads are a real threat. These enable a website to exploit a 0-day vulnerability in your browswer to execute malicious code on your system. Note that sometimes websites are hacked to behave maliciously without the website's owners being malicious. While browser manufacturers work to fix security problems quickly, the 1534 publicly announced ...


2

Malware can be distributed in various fashions: as directly executable programs, or hidden in other files and formats used as containers. If you apply a process that always decrypts a given file, replacing it with directly executable malware is not very promising, decryption will simply fail. In case of public/private key cryptography (and a known public ...


2

Let's not overestimate the finding of the security consultant because some of them don't really know what they do. Of course I don't know the real report and can base my opinion only on what you wrote. But I had once to do with a report where the consultant complained that the EICAR virus was not found by a firewall when it was used as a subject of a mail, ...


2

You can wait until the syndicate finishes their reign of terror and releases the key. For example, all the keys for TeslaDecrypt are now available, so ALL versions can be decrypted now without having to pay. I just recovered some files for a friend who kept his encrypted files from when he was attacked, and can now decrypt them all. ESET Releases Decryptor ...



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