New answers tagged

1

Mark Buffalo has already provided an good answer on things to consider. However, I'd like to expand on his answer with few solutions, ofcourse it's extremely broad question so by all means this isn't remotely close to an "best" solution. It's just things to consider. I'll be making many assumptions based on this question and they will be: The operating ...


4

MD5-based anti-virus just doesn't work MD5-based anti-malware works decently against static-infections that never change. If it changes even by a little bit, you're screwed. However, MD5 is also vulnerable to collisions, so you're going to have a fair share of false positives. I wouldn't rely on this method at all. SHA-256 would probably be better for ...


3

The best numbers I've found so far are in the Microsoft Security Essential Report 19 where they show at page 89 that with full real-time protection the infection rate is still at about 2..5%. Then there are numbers from the Cicso Annual Security Report 2016 where they claim a time to detection at about 20 hours, but adware and browser injections are at ...


1

There's no requirement in the Windows operating system to properly register all the components that the program is going to install, or to provide a means to uninstall. Largely this is a "gentleman's agreement", which is in the interests of legitimate software companies to follow, and they generally do. Malware authors have no interest, (and no requirement ...


1

Malware is not made to be easy to remove. That's the point. You should not even be able to tell that your computer was infected. The malware authors employs several techniques to make their software almost impossible to remove: encrypted code, multi-part software, self-healing components, and rootkit behavior. If you could just go to programs' list and ...


1

Malware isn't installed as a "program" like a game or a web browser. Malware can replace an existing program that gets executed when the computer is booted, so you'd never see anything was wrong, or hides in RAM, or many other options.


0

That depends a lot on which privileges the malware has on your PC. Since the initial malware was started as a process on your computer, it will run with the privileges of the respective account - if you are logged in as administrator, it will run with admin privileges. If not, it might still escalate to get those. And usually the first thing malware does ...


0

What I would do is: Close all apps in the App Switcher. Close all tabs in Safari. Ensure "Block Pop-ups" is enabled in Settings > Safari and "Clear History and Website" while you're there. Go to Settings > General > Device Management and delete any profiles you don't recognize. Clear the RAM on the iPad. Hold down the power button until the "Slide To Power ...


1

Check on another device to see if the same behaviour occurs. I don't believe removal of malware is the scope of this forum. However, I'd recommend you do an virus scan, check your BHOs and Addins on your browser.


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You are quite correct, unfortunately. The word "virus" originally only referred to parasitic code snippets that reproduced by attaching (usually prepending) themselves to existing executables. In those days, "sneaker net" was the most common way of transferring files, often games and other software, so viruses were by far the most common form of malware. ...


1

A virus can be a standalone file. I could send you a meterpreter file as an exe, for instance. No manipulating of execution flow is required. A parasitic virus infects an existing file. I could inject meterpreter into calc.exe for instance. Exploits exploit the program processing a file. That's where the flow of execution gets manipulated. That's where ...


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Yes, in short, a USB drive can be used in this way. I always scan any USB that is put in my computer, regardless of who it is from.


6

Using something like BadUSB can turn any USB device into a keyboard, RubberDucky makes this even easier. Using these techniques you can run commands and install mallware on a computer without the user ever pressing a button or opening a file. So yes, using a untrusted USB (storage) device can be dangerous.


2

Sharing a USB is always a risk. We never know what new ransomware or malware that pendrive contains. Its always advised to scan the USB before opening the files in your system. Also how would you know by seeing if a file is corrupted,malware etc? Ever came across autorun malware in windows? You dont need to click on the file for it to run


0

Signatures are generally non-interoperable. There is some licensing going on, but generally, I'd say AV-vendors all have their own engines, and these engines may not be even able to understand the signatures/rulesets of other engines. Having people on staff (maybe even around the clock) that can extract useful signatures from a set/family of malware is ...


1

Some av vendors reuse the signatures of anothers. For example Kaspersky Lab have inserted into its bases the signatures for some non-malicious files to detect the reuse and after some time they observed them detected by some another's companies' avs as malicious.


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Yes, signatures vary as they are developed by the antivirus vendors independently of one another. One vendor's product may catch malware that another misses, or get a false positive that another would not find. You may end up with multiple vendors having identical signatures for the same piece of malware because of malware's traits have few, or one ...


4

As far as I'm aware, presently (Who knows, maybe in the future?), it is not possible that you have received the infection from swapping the RAM. Primarily because RAM is volatile and so will lose any data stored on it after the power is removed (though the data is retained for a very short period of time). A few more likely scenarios: Did you plug in a ...



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