New answers tagged

1

There are several ways such an ad-injecting malware might work and it does not even need to be installed on your system. Common ways are: Browser extension: there were several prominent cases where common browser extension were sold and went malicious. These probably can do anything, including manipulating data accessed by https. Local proxies. In this ...


2

You can try rebooting in safe-mode and uninstall. Tap F8 during bootup to open Advanced Boot Options, choose safe-mode and go uninstall Avira. That is assuming you have a legacy Avira application and not a virus impersonating it.


2

You should be okay. It is one of the oldest tricks in the book. The practice is refereed to as Malvertising. The idea is to make it appear the machine is compromised or having issues. They then usually direct you to a fix or a recommended program. However those are actually the real malware. And they may be ransomware, adware, bots, a remote admin tool, or ...


0

This is probably an example of the fake malware detected malware, trying to trick you into downloading and installing a "cleaner" that is actually malware.


2

You should NOT. First, you don't know if the file is trustable, you got it from some "source". It is never advisable to install APKs from untrustworthy sources, especially on your primary device. Second, it contains a known vulnerability. Third, it is an offline game, and it requires full internet connection(it may be because of ads, but you never know ...


9

The message means that Facebook has received some unusual requests from your computer, like for example a large number of attempts to guess passwords for different accounts or attempts to post spam. So Facebook assumes that you have some kind of malware on your computer and recommends you to install a malware scanner to get rid of it. For more information ...


2

You can wait until the syndicate finishes their reign of terror and releases the key. For example, all the keys for TeslaDecrypt are now available, so ALL versions can be decrypted now without having to pay. I just recovered some files for a friend who kept his encrypted files from when he was attacked, and can now decrypt them all. ESET Releases Decryptor ...


3

I'm afraid wiping the machine, changing all your passwords from another good machine, doing a fresh install from known good install media, and restoring the data (carefully) from backups really is the only solution guaranteed to clean your machine. In the trade we call this "nuke it from orbit", and the reason it is the only way to be sure is that you ...


0

First of all if your system really is infected it is hard to trust it again. But you could try to remove this adware with antimalwarebytes and with hitman PRO. The HTTPS error you get is the same I got while using bullguard. This could be because of your AV protection. I highly recommend you check your safe browsing section of your AV. If this did not help ...


4

Your computer is very likely not infected with any virus. Websites which claim that they just scanned your computer for viruses without your consent, found that is infected with something and you need to pay lots of money for some product is a scam which appears since the early 2000s and it's quite surprising that there are apparently still people falling ...


2

Drive-by downloads are a real threat. These enable a website to exploit a 0-day vulnerability in your browswer to execute malicious code on your system. Note that sometimes websites are hacked to behave maliciously without the website's owners being malicious. While browser manufacturers work to fix security problems quickly, the 1534 publicly announced ...


4

None of the symptoms you posted is a sign of having malware on your computer. My internet connection slows to a crawl often Complain to your internet service provider or find a better one. my games keep crashing Viruses don't tend to do that. When you have problems running games, it's far more likely to be a problem with your graphic driver... or ...


0

There is no sure way to tell. You can find a virus on your computer, and then I guess you'll know that there is a virus. But it is not possible to be sure that there is a virus responsible for all of the suspicious activity on your computer. It is equally possible that someone is hacking into your computer and screwing around with it. But in terms of ...


0

Possibly. Not really with new browsers, as they have better security. However a video cannot cause any damage, unless it forced you to have a full hard disk. However pages can. Mostly if you have plug-ins. Scripts can cause malware, and much more.


-6

As a programmer, the answer is simply put: "No." Video files do not contain executable code. Even if they did, Windows is very different from Linux in design. The two use different binary formats for the OS that are incompatible. What exploits work on Windows normally won't work on Linux. The only thing that a tampered video file could do is trip a bug ...


0

You don't mention what phone it is, when the problem started or where you got it in the first place. I've found that some of the cheaper Android phones and tablets for sale on Amazon come with malware embedded in the firmware itself which installs all sorts of adware and helpful Chinese "utilities," even after deleting all the responsible apps and non-stock ...


4

An increasingly common attack is to use your Google Play Store credentials to force apps onto the device via the web page for the app. If you are seeing apps install automatically this is the likely source. In any event if you got malware on your phone, you really need to change your Google credentials and reset any 2fa tokens or app-specific passwords ...


33

but the implication in the other question is that videos in question have been downloaded and played by media software on the target computer. No it is not. The implication is that there need to be a bug in the code handling the data. For instance the ffmpeg library is used in browsers like Chrome or Firefox and it had several serious bugs in the ...


11

A web browsers video system is just another video player, so the same problems apply which were mentioned in the linked question. The smaller set of supported video codecs greatly reduces the attack surface, but doesn't make bugs in the decoders for these formats inconceivable. The Adobe Flash plugin is renowned for its plethora of security bugs in the past ...


10

Yes, VLC can be hacked. Here you can check CVE list of VLC. But don't panic, just because your VLC freeze, that doesn't necessarily ​mean that someone hacked you. Make sure that your VLC is up to date. Can you submit that file to this website Cuckoo Sandbox and then paste the report here, just out of curiosity let us see, what will heppen when that file is ...


19

Video files by themselves can not contain a "virus" in the classical sense but they can be used to exploits bugs in the media players (or sometimes even the OS) when handling the file formats and codecs. By using these exploits they can then execute code. Like most video players vlc also has/had lots of bugs which could be exploited, including in the ...


5

The attack listed in the referenced question certainly would not work with VLC or Linux. VLC does not support the obscure Windows Media Player DRM it utilizes (at least not to my knowledge), and even if it did, the purpose of the attack is to trick you into downloading and running some Windows executable files. That being said, a different kind of attack is ...



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