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1

Yes a Word doc can contain a virus. Rename the DOCX to zip and you can open it with WinZip or another tool. This will expose all OLE embedded data, however it's possible that the individual files in that Winzip are virus vectors (JPG, etc)


0

In short, yes a .docx file can have a malicious payload. This typically comes in the form of a malicious VB script or macro embedded within the document.


1

A virus, by its original definition, is a piece of code that gets attached to other programs. An executable gets "infected" and still works more or less as normal but also executes the virus payload when it runs, typically infecting other programs on the same computer. True viruses are rare these days. A worm is a program that replicates itself over a ...


0

Worms travel from computer to computer on their own. Effectively they have the ability to hack remote computers (internet and intranet) to get into other systems. Viruses are more localized, meaning they travel from program to program. Viruses tend to be given to other computers by nature of infecting a program and that program is transferred to another ...


0

I have taken a quick look at this git and it seams real: https://github.com/Zypeh/flame-sourcecode


1

Practically - no. The SIM card is a computer. By design, this computer can control the mobile phone. It is possible to install new software on this computer, but if this SIM card wasn't created by you, you can't sign new software properly and it will not work. (Also sorry for my english :) There is interesting Defcon 21 video "The Secret Life of SIM Cards" ...


5

In older times, virus could be damaging to the hardware in the following way: Playing with video signal rates, so as to exceed the tolerance ranges of CRT monitors. Post-1995 CRT monitors included safety mechanisms (and LCD panels are inherently protected), but older monitors have died that way. Reflashing the BIOS. This does not permanently kill the ...


1

For the typical modern computer, the answer is "no". There are exceptions, though. Probably the most effective attack would be to turn off the computer's cooling system, run the CPU at full load, and hope something burns out before the computer's thermal protection system shuts it down. Fast-reacting shutdown systems have been standard for about a decade, ...


0

Haven't you heard?! But in all seriousness, yes malware can cause physical damage to your computer. Perhaps the most notable instance of this is Stuxnet which caused the centrifuges of nuclear centers in Iran to spin at a rapid pace, while informing operators that the were functioning at normal speeds.


1

Yes Linux AV such as Sophos check for and find EICAR. EICAR is a test file with a known signature used to establish the fact that your signature-based AV is working. Many certifiers require a positive result for that test.


2

Maybe., Maybe not. Honestly Just an icon is not enough to identify that you have a threat or not. And not any key logger or malware will show itself to the target its presence(unless it was a buggy one). Possible explanation for the Mystery Icon: could be an unwanted software that got installed along with any of the softwares you installed. could be some ...


1

EICAR is so simple it doesn't need any Windows COM files or anything ! Have you actually looked at the EICAR code ? Its all self contained in one tiny file. As for why would Linux antivirus need to look for a Windows virus? Lots of people use Linux machines as servers (mail,web,file etc.) ... all of which may serve Windows clients. Seems fairly ...


1

You could try (if you haven't already done so) Virustotal, which provides a service for scanning URLs or files for threats.


0

Corrupted executable file: The setup files are corrupted. Please obtain a new copy of the program. Usually the above error message appears when an executable file is missing some of the essential components/libraries that is essential to proceed the installation. It is very common that many files could be corrupted in some of the sites we download ...


3

Yes, no, maybe so. There are a couple major things in play here. Javascript is a full fledged programming language. This did not use to be the case in it's infancy as a crutch for DHTML (Dynamic HTML, whatever that was!). As a full fledged language with a full blown interpreter/compiler it is really no different than other most other languages software is ...


5

The threat a virus impose in your system is, ideally, independent of its programming language because viruses exploit vulnerabilities in operating systems, applications, APIs etc. In this sense, a Javascript virus is as dangerous as any other virus. Also, for web applications, JavaScript is one of the main attack vectors in techniques such as cross-site ...


0

One practical answer to this question, too. Which was, "If I copy/paste a virus on my computer and I never click on it," will it do any harm? And as others have noted, it will almost certainly not do any harm, if you copy it to your computer and do nothing else. Email and web browsing are separate topics. However, if you want to store a virus for some ...


23

No, a virus does not need to be clicked on or accessed by the user directly to infect a system. All the virus laden file needs to do is take advantage of a vulnerability in the program that is accessing it. Examples in Windows XP Security Bulletin MS11-006 documents a bug in the way thumbnails were produced by windows explorer to trick it into running ...


45

A virus can't do anything by simply being present on your system as data. A virus is just a program, it must be executed by something. The trick is that that something does not have to be you clicking it. Computers do many things automatically without your attention. They accept requests for file transfers, remote desktop, provide details about their ...


5

It depends. I couldn't agree more with HackerCow's answer. There are lot of viruses that are different in the way they behave such as executing by click, auto-executing, auto-duplicating, etc. Once a virus enters your system, you are vulnerable no matter what the type or behavior it possesses. And as an obvious statement, we know that XP is not so great ...


3

No. It is not always necessary to click on a virus. For instance. A virus may be dropped on your computer by a drive-by download. This is done when you visit a site which exploits a vulnerability in your browser, hence dropping malware on your system. This also allows a remote attacker to start the virus. Another example is a virus which will attach itself ...


40

It depends on the file format. Executables do not run themselves, unless some clever trick is employed (autorun.inf and .lnk were popular techniques a while ago). Nevertheless, MS11-006 demonstrates that clicking on an infected file is not always necessary (this exploit triggered when a thumbnail of the infected document was rendered by the system, for ...


7

It depends. Typically trivial viruses require you to click on them (i.e. execute a file in some way). There should be no way to execute code without you double-clicking virus.exe or similar. In reality, a virus author can technically find a bug in windows (which isn't that improbable on XP) and cause trouble that way. For example, if there is a bug in the ...



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