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4

Yes, malware exists in all sorts of languages. Often, though, some of the most critical fiddly bits of many exploits are written not in C or C++, but rather directly in machine code, carefully assembled often by hand. This may be the only want to get the sizing and alignment correct for what you're trying to do. The distance from the "metal" is a matter of ...


2

You can write a virus in any language. The condition is the OS vulnerability that is being exploited and the language tools that are available to take advantage of it. "High-level" languages are not 'further' from the OS kernel, but rather they are more abstracted from the kernel from the programmer's point of view. Even Python can access network sockets, ...


1

The most important part of this post is "with antivirus". Do you have automatic submissions turned on? If so, those computers might have sent in an 'automatic submission' to the AV mothership at some point. It might have been flagged for evaluation, and possibly run in a controlled environment to see what behavior it would exhibit. These environments are ...


0

The of plain text messages is that when the mail client is only reading plain text, none of the potentially dangerous or hidden scripts will be interpreted or run at all. It will just be a string to the mail client.


0

There are programs called binders which will normally attach an executable to an image. Malware found in images tend to be RATs(Remote Administration Tools) which is some skid stuff that some skid will use to gain access to your computer. Normally this is only used though on websites where horny idiots talk to these skids, and the skids pretend they're a ...


0

For pretty much any file format, the programs who read it might have some bugs exploitable by a maliciously crafted file. It can happen (and has happened) also for images; but it'd generally be limited to a single particular program (or library) reading it, not a general "image with malware" that attacks all such programs. Even text files aren't ...


0

Exploits are just that, exploits. Someone finds a vulnerability in some widely used code, and then sets out to set the stage for that vulnerability to do its thing. Let's pretend for example someone out there figured out that some widely-used email client has a bug that leads to a buffer overflow in some specific circumstance. If enough malformed data is fed ...


24

The other answers mostly talk about attaching arbitrary code to images via steganographic techniques, but that's not very interesting since it requires that the user be complicit in extracting and executing that. The user could just execute malicious code directly if that's their goal. Really you're interested in whether there's a possibility of ...


7

Yes, there are ways to 'exploit' buffer overflows. Sometimes the code may need to be executed via a separate script, and in theory you could assemble a virus from multiple images that contained code hidden within the picture using stenography but there are easier ways. Basically many computer systems expected images to comply with the exact specification ...


1

Yes, it is possible to hide malware in an image. It is not very common attack at all but recently it seems that malware authors start hiding malware inside images. Malware analysis is not my thing. if you want more information search for "Steganography Malware". One advice is do not open emails from untrusted/unknown source.


4

You can always hide files/programs/anything in the 'slack space' of any file. Then you could run a script later to extract and/or compile what you have hidden... For instance, you could embed a malicious executable (or smaller script) within multiple images on a website. When a user goes to the website, they download the images. Learn more about Slack ...


2

additional, to what RyPeck said, you should check, if a .htaccess - file might be found in your docroot, containing malicious redirects (if so, the attacker has write-access to your docroot and your server is probably hacked) is this url you mentioned (mywebsite.com/smth) a valid url for your site? what are your running for a software? (eg wordpress, ...


1

I know of three ways for an attacker to trigger a website redirection on content from a server. If your website has any of the following - Accepts user input Advertisements Content loaded from a database It is possible a third party may have found the means to insert content on your page that will render as HTML/Javascript and trigger a redirection. ...


1

Yes, Macs can be infected by malware, too - just like basically any other computer system. They have been explicitly targeted by malware creators in the more recent years, which coincides with their gain in popularity. The question on what options there are for cleaning such a system can get philosophical. Personally I would recommend you to reinstall the ...



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