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1

The file is probably benign but as per your question, here's the real answer: In terms of investigating, open the file up in a forensic imager or just simple HxD to see the real guts. You can also just open the .swf in an editor. In am imager, you can also take its hash and search for similar hashes (virustotal gives your the option of enter hashes)... The ...


1

You could try (if you haven't already done so) Virustotal, which provides a service for scanning URLs or files for threats.


1

Corrupted executable file: The setup files are corrupted. Please obtain a new copy of the program. Usually the above error message appears when an executable file is missing some of the essential components/libraries that is essential to proceed the installation. It is very common that many files could be corrupted in some of the sites we download ...


3

Yes, no, maybe so. There are a couple major things in play here. Javascript is a full fledged programming language. This did not use to be the case in it's infancy as a crutch for DHTML (Dynamic HTML, whatever that was!). As a full fledged language with a full blown interpreter/compiler it is really no different than other most other languages software is ...


5

The threat a virus impose in your system is, ideally, independent of its programming language because viruses exploit vulnerabilities in operating systems, applications, APIs etc. In this sense, a Javascript virus is as dangerous as any other virus. Also, for web applications, JavaScript is one of the main attack vectors in techniques such as cross-site ...


1

"Too dangerous" is very subjective of a term. It really depends on what the JS is being used for. JS is merely a tool. The most common (and perhaps most damaging) is called a cross site scripting attack where malicious JS redirects traffic. This traffic can be spoofed and therefore appear as trusted/secure but it really isnt. Thus, I say this attack is ...


0

One practical answer to this question, too. Which was, "If I copy/paste a virus on my computer and I never click on it," will it do any harm? And as others have noted, it will almost certainly not do any harm, if you copy it to your computer and do nothing else. Email and web browsing are separate topics. However, if you want to store a virus for some ...


25

No, a virus does not need to be clicked on or accessed by the user directly to infect a system. All the virus laden file needs to do is take advantage of a vulnerability in the program that is accessing it. Examples in Windows XP Security Bulletin MS11-006 documents a bug in the way thumbnails were produced by windows explorer to trick it into running ...


44

A virus can't do anything by simply being present on your system as data. A virus is just a program, it must be executed by something. The trick is that that something does not have to be you clicking it. Computers do many things automatically without your attention. They accept requests for file transfers, remote desktop, provide details about their ...


7

It depends. I couldn't agree more with HackerCow's answer. There are lot of viruses that are different in the way they behave such as executing by click, auto-executing, auto-duplicating, etc. Once a virus enters your system, you are vulnerable no matter what the type or behavior it possesses. And as an obvious statement, we know that XP is not so great ...


4

No. It is not always necessary to click on a virus. For instance. A virus may be dropped on your computer by a drive-by download. This is done when you visit a site which exploits a vulnerability in your browser, hence dropping malware on your system. This also allows a remote attacker to start the virus. Another example is a virus which will attach itself ...


41

It depends on the file format. Executables do not run themselves, unless some clever trick is employed (autorun.inf and .lnk were popular techniques a while ago). Nevertheless, MS11-006 demonstrates that clicking on an infected file is not always necessary (this exploit triggered when a thumbnail of the infected document was rendered by the system, for ...


8

It depends. Typically trivial viruses require you to click on them (i.e. execute a file in some way). There should be no way to execute code without you double-clicking virus.exe or similar. In reality, a virus author can technically find a bug in windows (which isn't that improbable on XP) and cause trouble that way. For example, if there is a bug in the ...


0

Do you really need to use your work machine for pr0n? Can you use your personal cell phone / tablet / computer? That is the preferred approach here. If not (got that urge), I recommend Chrome Incognito Mode in the browser. Use Chrome. And a consistent pr0n site that hasn't caused problems for you in the past. Do your homework, dont just google "pov blowjob" ...


0

I don't think that not being technically proficient is really a problem for installing him a Linux. Given that he has gotten so paranoid to not want go online anymore, it should be possible to convince him to try that. Linux is not hard when it is already installed and working properly (no programs missing, hardware errors…) there aren't special needs, ...


0

No, they won't be much isolated. Each install will be isolated from a normal usage. For instance, a Windows update installed on one Windows, won't be applied to the other. The main problem, as hinted by Rory Aslop, is that both will be able to see each other partition. So a virus which eg. infected each .exe files on the computer, will infect both ...


4

Virtual machines work as sand boxes to keep bad things in, not bad things out. If the host is compromised, so are the containers running within it as the virtual machine has to call out to the host for many actions and the host has full awareness and control over the system running within it.


1

Malware doesn't care if you're running a "standard-install Ubuntu desktops only". Malware will run as long as the system supports the correct instruction set that the ELF binary was compiled for. Ubuntu is debian based supporting the following instruction sets: IA-32, x86-64, ARMv7, ARM64, PowerPC. Generally you find most are built on IA-32 or x86-64 ...


0

Yes, because while most viruses are not targeted at Linux, and so you personally are less at risk, you can still be a good citizen when sending data to people who use Windows. Example: you receive a file from WindowsFan1999, via email or dropbox or CD or whatever. You try and open it, but you think it's corrupted. so you forward the file on to knowledgeable ...


-1

Why on earth you would use Windows 7 for this task is beyond my comprehension. Anybody with a Linux USB drive could boot, and then mount your Windows partition and pull files from it. Well known trick. You could encrypt your entire hard drive but with TrueCrypt potentially compromised that might not be a completely safe bet. Never let the computer you are ...


1

Yes, it's possible, but you need to protect the entire computer, rather than a single folder. It's also a lot harder than you think, and probably not necessary. Network attacks: Do your development on a system that is not, has never, and will never be directly connected to a network. Remove any wireless or bluetooth adapters from the system to prevent ...


1

No. Consider that when you're using a computer, you're just interacting with software that's reading and writing these files. Anything your intended software can do, malicious software can do. That being said, you could use Trusted Boot, Full Disk Encryption, and run only signed/verified software on your machine. Using an air-gapped (never connected to ...


29

You can install an antivirus if you want. It should not hurt your machine, but don't expect much protection for your system and don't consider yourself entirely safe. The efficacy of antivirus software is very relative, and they're mostly in use to avoid propagate old malware especially if you have Windows machines in your ecosystem. You should expect a ...


1

Question is asked for Ubuntu.If I can little wide the question to Linux desktop editions, SELinux type "Walled Garden" solution would be much useful. In SELinux mandatory access-control policies (MAC) can stop or limit the damage in infection attempt. Unlike AV which runs as separate process which makes burden to OS, SELinux has native support by the Linux ...


-2

I don't see anyone bringing up this explanation yet so I will. You may or may not already know that the Mac OSX kernel started as a fork of the BSD kernel. Over the years, the Mac OSX kernel has evolved into a hybrid kernel. The BSD and GNU kernels are considered Monolithic. The difference between a monolithic kernel and hybrid kernel is basically that the ...


2

For all the tl;dr people, No. What you should do though is this: Install nifty browser plugins like AdBlock, FlashBlock, and Disconnect.me Set restrictive Flash and Java permissions Firewall: on prevent execution of non-identified Applications (and whitelist apps at your discretion) stop telling your friends Windows is bad because it gets viruses and ...


0

Your problem probably has nothing to do with viruses. If you can only access a specific domain, it may be that this one (for whatever reason) is inside your DNS cache but you can't reach any other site because your DNS server is unresponsive. I would start by using a network analysis utility (such as Wireshark) to determine whether DNS queries succeed or ...


1

If the host machine has a damaged hosts file, any traffic going from the guest VM, through the host, will encounter this damaged hosts file before it accesses the internet. EVEN IF the guest is using a USB wifi adapter, it will still have to interact with the hosts host file.


0

VM commands get redirected through the host OS. Some stuff may go direct to the CPU depending on what kind of virtualization support your system has, but that is still only granted at the will of the host OS. If the host OS is compromised, then the virus can potentially impact anything running within it, including a virtual other process. Sandboxing tries ...


0

You might need to change some computer habits if you've been "pirated several times already", but to answer your question, yes it's definitely possible for a virus on your host to have adverse effects on a VM. The VM uses resources allocated to it by the host machine. If your Guest OS has direct access to your host file system for example, it's entirely ...


1

Here was my situation about 3 months ago. Processor running at 95C, fans on full. Puzzled I start trying to dig into whats doing it. Google Chrome had web workers (6) running at 100%. I had installed a series of colored themes for the browser so I could run profiles for contracts I had. Personal, Work, and Work2. One of the themes I had installed was ...


26

This is a little long but this exact argument has been rehashed for the last 14 years. I want to put it to bed. I worked for Apple Tech support from 1992-2001 and have been an Apple developer since. So, I have a very good historical view of Apple ecosystem malware security. My conclusion? 3rd party anti-malware software on the Mac is unnecessary and as ...


23

Despite the common wisdom, I would not recommend running anti-virus for two reasons: Anti-virus does not really work. Though it might catch trivial or well-known viruses, it mostly just gives you a false sense of security. Anti-virus can cause problems. In order to function, anti-virus programs have to situate themselves quite low on the computer ...


39

There is no clear evidence that third party anti-malware security software (AV software) is more effective than Apple's own security solutions to protect Macs. Rich Mogull on the Mac TidBITS blog explains: Far less malware exists for Macs, but even there we see limited effectiveness across tools. For example, in a recent test by Thomas Reed, even the ...


20

Macs do get viruses, the main reason why there were historically so few viruses around for Mac is because their market share was so small. When someone writes a virus, most of the time they want to infect as many targets as possible. So 10 years ago this would result in almost only Windows viruses since they had such large market share. Recently, however, ...


14

I'll answer in the form of an anecdote. Back in 2003, I was working in tech support for a Mac-based organisation. We were essentially a government contractor and, as such, nearly all our money came from sending Microsoft Word documents to the government to document what we had done and what we should be paid for. Someone managed to bring a Word macro virus ...


1

Note: All the information on this post has been copied from the TechSupport article here. Every major antimalware vendor has a dedicated E-mail address through which new samples can be submitted. The procedure is as follows: Configure your Email client Make a password protected archive and add the sample to it. The password should be "infected". Send the ...


1

TL;DR: I would suggest that submitting to VirusTotal is enough. Details: Because there are so many samples of malware and the fact that each binary in modern malware campaigns can be tested to be FUD (fully undetectable), VirusTotal is your best best I would argue. It may or may not be picked up by vendors, but this gives you the best shot of doing some ...


0

A binary virus that targets more than one hardware architecture is more of a theoretical threat than a realistic one. However, several viruses that target one hardware architecture but that run on multiple operating systems exist. Another example is the Peelf / Winux / Lindose Virus, which exists as a proof-of-concept.


0

The virtualization software and even the hardware can contain all kinds of bugs that would allow a guest program to access the host. There are already known malware that detects VMs and some may be able to use these vulnerabilities. Also don't bother about dual-booting or changing disks as virus/rootkits that attack BIOS are not even new. The only secure ...


1

It is theoretically possible to write multi-architecture binary malware. In practice, it's very difficult, belonging to the realm of proofs of concept rather than actual malware in the wild. Script-based malware is a very different story. A well-written shell script, for example, could infect any Unix-like operating system; a Microsoft Office macro virus ...


3

It might, different architectures may stop binaries compiled for one architecture being executed on another. On the other hand, if the virus does not depend heavily on the host architecture (eg. it uses interpreted code such as shell scripts) or is designed to work across multiple architectures then it may not help. A better approach might be to use an ...



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