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My friend was affected by the same Scareware Virus, at the exact same time as you. Assuming you are on Windows 8 and haven't already fixed the issue at hand: Open Task Manager > Startup > Disable Startup program by Microsoft Corporation Restart your comptuer This is only a temporary workaround until we can find the source program and do a full, clean ...


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Here you will find a brief description made by AVG Labs. In this link you will read an analysis that someone made about another variant of the same trojan. In this blog, a company lists other names of the same malware given by different security firms. And here you have instructions about manual removing of the NAW variant of the same trojan.


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The usual naming of malware is [targeted platform]/[name].[variant] The variants of a malware are numbered alphabetically. When your AV software vendor already uses three letters to describe the variants it means that there are a lot of different variants of this particular malware in the wild. You might find more useful information about this malware when ...


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We have also noticed something over at the SANS Internet Storm Center: https://isc.sans.edu/forums/diary/Odd+new+ssh+scanning+possibly+for+D-Link+devices/19055


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"Re-releases" happen by accident all the time, when an infected, mothballed system gets re-activated, or old, infected media gets pulled out of archive. Case in point, my webserver has a log entry for a Code Red infection attempt in 2013, twelve years after the worm was originally released. Because of this, antivirus software does not normally remove ...


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If you peruse the various vendors catalogs of malware detected, successfully cleaned malware is re-released continuously with tweaks or is polymorphic in a manner that requires updates in detection to take care of software updates their creators apply. Viruses and malware are just like OS systems now. All those security updates that you see released for ...


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A clever attacker can set up a site so that if you click on it even once, within seconds he can take over your computer. Even worse, you might not have to go to his site. If you click a link that leads to his site, he could feasibly "own" your computer. Beware! Whenever you visit a Web page, lots of invisible activity can happen on your computer. For ...


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Remove your browsers profile data from your account, and clean out any extension synchronization you might have. As others have said if other accounts are unaffected it is likely a rouge plugin of some kind. I also wouldn't trust that profile for much, if it was me, I would get whatever static files I needed out of that account, delete it and make a new ...


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There is simply not enough information here to even propose a solution. It sounds to me like you have some form of pendrive that auto populates with common directories often used by people. Many manufactures embed a software suite with their thumbdrives that creates links and folders for you, in which case buy a different drive that doesn't have a setup of ...


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Since other user accounts seem fine, the system itself is probably not compromised. In that case, I'd back up the user's home directory, then nuke their preferences (every file and directory in $HOME that begins with a .). If that fixes it, I'd selectively restore files from backup until things break again, then take a careful look at the ...


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Here are some of the steps I would take: 1) Run Burpsuite as a proxy server, intercept the calls, and analyze whether or not there is a specific page you are visiting that is causing this. 2) Uninstall any browser plugins you may be using 3) Remove and reinstall the browser(s) The extreme measure would be to dig into your files and find where the ...



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