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5

Finding out that a user is using a VPN service provider isn't that difficult. Most of them have static IP addresses for their exit gateways, so it could just be using a list of known IP addresses to identify VPNs. And even when they don't have a list, a simple reverse DNS lookup might tell them that the IP has a hostname which is obviously a VPN provider and ...


4

If you route your traffic throught two VPNs you'll gain a lot of anonymity. However you're not anonymous to every possible attacker, as an attacker could break both VPNs (NSA broke quite a lot VPNs), so an attacker could backtrace your connection from your target, break B, break A and get your IP - and this is what you wanted to avoid. So at most an ...


3

The VPS Assuming it's your VPS that you pay for at a VPS provider, they could possibly trace you back. You're paying this by either a credit card or a PayPal like payment system. Even if you do not use one of the payment options described above, if you purchased the VPS from your regular IP, the VPS provider will have this logged. The VPN Having a VPN ...


3

To quote The Grugq on this: "VPNs provide privacy - Tor provides anonymity. Confuse the two at your peril." So, don't use VPN for anonymity but use it to protect your privacy instead. Update: to answer your questions in a more direct manner: Given this set-up, has VPN B any chance to identify an user? so how could VPN B identify a single user? ...


3

Given that the VPN headers around each packet will take up space and then disappear, they could be looking at packet size vs MTU to come up with a way of guessing (it would be a wild guess) that the user is behind a VPN because their packets are consistently smaller than other streams. An even wilder guess would be that they are looking at round trip time ...


3

"Foolproof" does not necessarily means "NSA-proof" or whatever. A foolproof security system is meant to be a system usable by non-technical users and lowering as much as possible the risk of a misconfiguration impacting the security. Browser's, for instance, involve a lot of "foolproof" security technology against phishing sites, etc.. In case of ...


2

Using VPN may secure the connection between your device and vpn server but its not enough. Not using vpn may be more secure than using a public one, you shouldn't trust a unknown machine. Building your own VPN server on a droplet is something you can try. I'm using SoftEther VPN Server for that and I can suggest that to you. It has a nice GUI administrating ...


2

A VPN maskerade you real IP by using the VPN IP instead. The VPN IP is shared by an unknown number of persons, and its usage is public as long as the person subscribe a contract to the VPN provide. Therefore, by using a VPN: You open yourself to attacks such as IP spoofing, it will be trivial for someone else to use the very same IP address than you, ...


2

Yes, it could be a disadvantage. What is boils down to is how much you trust the VPN provider. For most secure protocols, using a VPN will be just as secure because your communications are encrypted by the protocol. If there was a MITM at the other end of the VPN connection they would not be able to do much (apart from a side channel attack, which are ...


1

Trust is obviously key, since you are trading trust in your local connectivity (whatever path your connection takes through your local ISP, the coffee house wifi, etc) for trusting the connectivity of the VPN service and their internet path. If it's a large and reputable VPN provider compared to a coffee house wifi, then you are probably going in the right ...


1

You may be interested in reading the following document: http://fish2.com/ipmi/bp.pdf. Moreover, I encourage you to read the other documentation made by this security researcher on IPMI which are very interesting and well written.


1

Nothing is really safe, and from the sound of it, you're using a system that you don't control, to access systems the network administrator or management is trying to prevent access to. It's not in their best interest for any of these types of connections. That being said, outside of any legal concerns that might develop (intellectual property transmission, ...


1

The two would be equally secure assuming you do things right (TLS certificate pinning on one side, and client cert authentication), but I'd prefer the VPN as it's easier to use in the long run. HTTPS isn't that easy to use - each HTTPS server should have a cert, the app accessing the API endpoints should take care of verifying the authenticity of the remote ...


1

"Accountability" will not change - you are still accountable for your activity. But, by doing what you mentioned (anonymous payment, disposable email), it will be very difficult for the investigators to "attribute" your activity to you through the administrative information provided to them by the VPN provider if you also obfuscate your IP by constantly ...


1

They could try using background processes to check for VPN usage, however I strongly suspect that is not the case for two reasons: Too much effort. Devs are lazy and an implementation like this would take a lot of effort (I wouldn't expect a simple poker game to do this). Not everyone uses the same client (PIA, OpenVPN, Securpoint, etc.), though if they ...


1

My preferred method is SSHFS. Your NAS server runs a SSH server which you then connect to from your remote machine. Leveraging SSHFS it will mount a drive on your remote machine via SSH (secure, encrypted) from the server you specify. I've not used the windows client version so YMMV. ...


1

I don't think you're going to find one: the nature of VPNs means that you have to configure the kinds of things you're trying to avoid. OpenVPN is as easy as it gets. Separately, you shouldn't need to work too hard on interface configuration with OpenVPN on Ubuntu; most of the hard work is done for you. But there might also be a decent front end or ...


1

It depends on what you're trying to defend against. If you're trying to prevent a site operator from identifying who you as a user are, multiple VPNs won't gain you anything. The operator will see the traffic as coming from the endpoint of the final VPN regardless of how many there are in the chain. You're still vulnerable to being identified through ...


1

Another approach or approaches that you can take to try to solve this problem is the idea of a semi-fragile signature. A semi-fragile signature is a digital signature which can be verified even when the data undergoes a limited set of transformations. I developed the concept originally (I called it a robust signature) in context of limiting the set of ...


1

Maybe your IP is exposed by RTC/DNS leaks. You can check ALL the information a website can get about you on http://ipleak.net/ . You should check this website every time before using the VPN. Besides, it might be possible that you've visited a website before without VPN. This website could have saved a cookie/localStorage variable on your PC and is possible ...


1

It sounds like what you really are looking for is a zero knowledge proof (or several zkps). You want to prove that (1) data belongs to a given class (general contents) and (2) that the data is within some limits (upper/lower bounds). Since you also want to transmit the data through the system, you'll need to bind the proof to the data in such a way that ...



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