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23

Preface: I consider this question to be a false dichotomy and an inversion of the burden of proof. One of the core tenets of building secure systems is that you minimise the attack surface, and resist additional components and features wherever possible to keep in line with this. As such, if one cannot identify a strong reason to include a component in the ...


7

No, you can't. It's as easy as you search information about "DNS leak" topic. When you use a VPN, you have the risk of a DNS leak. In other words, your DNS resolution will be made outside your VPN. Second, VPN server knows (in some way) who you are, where are you from and where you want to go. It's the same risk that exit nodes of Tor Network pose. ...


6

I see two possible uses for this even with logging disabled: A user violates some other part of the ToS, for example by paying for their account using a stolen credit card. An operator of a website which is targeted by a user's illegal activities contacts the VPN provider, and the VPN provider sees that the connection to that website is still open so it ...


6

Claim to "not log" is not the same as "not monitor connections". First is saving traces, second is analyzing activity when it happens, that does not necessary generates logs. However, while not totally clear, I understand they claim to not monitor too: NordVPN does not monitor, store or record logs for any VPN user. They do not monitor logs (since ...


4

You shouldn't trust them. You may suffer from "DNS Leaking". Ideally, your computer should send DNS Requests through the VPN, but it may request it directly. Your IP address will be exposed. Anyone snooping on the connection to the DNS Server will see what site you are accessing. That also opens you up to the dangerous Man-In-The-Middle attack. Use DNSCrypt. ...


4

OpenVPN is a piece of software that you can install on your machine, not server you can connect to. There are of course certain sites that offer free VPN services using OpenVPN and those could indeed do it to spy on you. There is absolutely no way for you to know. So if you chose to use a VPN provider that you can not entirely trust, make sure that you ...


3

You have no control over what the VPS is logging. They may be logging all communications, or none. There's no way for you to control it and no way for you to know what they are doing. The VPS provider is subject to all laws for its locale including search warrants. If you are looking for anonymity, consider Tor.


3

There are really two things you need to trust here: the DNS response's authenticity and privacy. Authenticity You can be reasonably sure of the authenticity of the data returned if all of the below are true: The site supports DNSSEC The site's TLD supports DNSSEC Your client checks DNSSEC - For a browser I recommend the extension at dnssec-validator.cz (...


2

While using your own VPN you can increase your security, putting the DNS server on the side of the network of the VPN service, and forcing any DNS request going through it through your own local DNS service/proxy. The ISP/DNS provider of the server/network where the DNS is hosted can however log, intercept and modify your DNS queries. Setting up a DNS ...


2

This will depend entirely on the use case for the majority of the staff. If they typically run long term sessions because their applications or work require it, then you can be sure that trying to move to a shorter session length will cause problems. If they mostly run applications that can work unattended and only need to be checked later, then a very ...


1

RoboKaren, There are many possible answers, but here are what I would consider the "top four". (1) If you absolutely must use OpenConnect and CLI, then maybe the "best" solution would be for you to create a small encrypted disk image in your home folder. You would then manually mount that disk image whenever you needed a VPN session and refer to that in ...


1

How come this is in the email? OpenVPN does not care about application layer, which means that it did not introduce such content to the email. This means that this content is either introduced by the sender or by the mail server. While you offer only a few information about the mail itself let me just guess: there is a hostname openvpn. there is some ...



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