Hot answers tagged

9

Very good question. Metadata is insanely powerful, and most people just don't realize how powerful it can be. Fortunately, it's not that hard to discover if you do a little digging into how technology and the internet works. I'm of the opinion that it's not very easy to hide online. In most cases, if you're a small fry, nobody's going to pay attention to ...


9

Short answer: You can't. Before you buy any service you should take a look at their Privacy Policy. For instance Hide My Ass: What data we collect: We will store the stamp and IP address when you connect and disconnect to our VPN service, the amount data transmitted (up- and download) during your session together with the IP address of the ...


5

When it is not encrypted in other ways (like https), then yes, they can. A VPN appears just like any other customer to their ISP. However, your VPN traffic is mixed with that of all other users of the VPN. From the point of view of the ISP, all traffic seems to originate from the VPN endpoint and they can not discern which connection belongs to which user ...


4

One common attack method consistent with your symptoms is DNS Hijacking, which is any means that an attacker uses to convince your computer that your bank's web site, "www.mybank.com" is actually at an IP which is a server under their control instead of the IP under your bank's control. When you type this into any browser, it heads for the malicious server ...


3

None of these answers are actually answering the question, and nobody is mentioning the power behind meta data. Let's go into detail as to how this can be done. How can you be caught using Private VPN when there's no logs about who you are? Generally speaking, there are logs about who you are, even if your VPN provider isn't logging anything about ...


3

First off "using a VPN" and "using a VPN provider" are not the same thing. The bottom line is you can't be sure that data exchanged with the public internet won't be spied on. Even if your provider doesn't spy themselves their upstreams may do so. Using a VPN provider to access services on the public internet is just trading one potential spy (your ISP ...


2

The ISP sees everything as it is, the connection is only safe between you and the VPN. As you mentioned, this VPN allows you to browse on insecure networks, public wifi hotspots with safety, defends against eavesdropping and MITM, so still good to have. There are no other solutions. If you try to communicate with a website with or without VPN that only ...


2

So they hacked my router? I didn't even know that was possible, but now that I think about it, it is remotely accessible on the LAN and the username/password is the manufacturer default. Will a hard reset of the router and then changing the username/password be sufficient now? Download the newest firmware for your router to a computer. Scan for ...


2

Seems to be a Man In The Middle attack with DNS spoofing. I suggest to perform a ping from an online service like this and check the IP address of the site. Then type it into your browser URL bar and check if you get redirect to the false website.


2

This is a rather large issue that has received a lot of attention in the past (not just on Stack Exchange). This boils down to several subtopics: Trust; Legal responsibilities of the VPN service provider; and Legal responsibilities of the VPN's hosting providers and data centers. There are many VPN services that claim to anonymize and protect your ...


2

Yes, a https connection (TLS/SSL) will be secure against snooping by your VPN provider, although they will know the IP address of the website you're connected to, so they will be able to run reverse DNS and likely at least figure out what domain you went to.


2

As far as I'm aware, Facebook don't actually block the new attempts from different IPs. Instead, they send an email to the registered email address with a notification that you logged into a new device, with a button to mark this as legitimate or malicious. The tracking appears to work not only via your IP, but also a long-term identification cookie and ...


2

The answer to your question is yes. They can see that you have used ports that are using for vpn services and they can see the encrypted traffic between you and the vpn provider.


1

It depends. Facebook analyzes the locations from which you use to login from. Depending on where your new IP is located, Facebook may, or may not, give you access to your account. In the case Facebook finds the new location suspicious, it will use another mean to validate your identity. (E.g. an email to validate your attempt.) Once you validate that new ...


1

Yes, they need your plaintext password to make the VPN work, simply because their service is badly configured. They shouldn't need your password in plaintext. The problem is that they use your plaintext password in their authentication procedure. When a new user creates an account, the VPN provider should properly hash their password and use that hash to ...


1

That's not the problem. Some people use VPNs for privacy (which is arguably misguided, as a VPN is a remote network connectivity tool and not a privacy tool, but that's an argument for another day) and having DNS queries leak out of the non-VPN connection is a concern in that scenario. Say, for example, I live in an oppressive regime with little regard for ...


1

Between your Tor client and the guard node, the communications are encrypted with three layers of AES128. The first layer is a key shared between you and the guard node. The second layer is a key shared between you and the middle node. The third layer is a key shared between you and the exit node. Each layer provides 2^128 possible combinations of keys. ...


1

You used a VPN. You hoped that the effect would be that you could hide your location and IP. There are lots of ways that websites can determine your real IP, and they are not considered hacking. What you need to do is to harden your setup to make it harder for these "de-anonymizing" techniques to work.


1

Simple! try to access the VPN site from anonymous source. like: Public coffee shop with public PC. Use Onion routing techs like TOR project. Use another VPN provider, there are many free ones. hope it helps.


1

Yes, this ISP can see your traffic, asssuming other protocols (HTTPS, etc) do not prevent them from doing so. You've got two aspects to the connection. Client <---> VPN Endpoint VPN Endpoint <---> Internet For (1), assuming it has been setup correctly, no one will be able to see anything outside of encrypted traffic. This is true whether you're ...


1

This is a suggestion to try to narrow down where the issue may lie. In Chrome, I suggest opening an incognito window, then opening the developer tools. Switch to the the network tab. Type in the correct URL in Chrome and hit enter. If the request in the network tab has the wrong URL, then something on your computer is changing the URL (maybe a bad add-on ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible