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4

If you are using OpenVPN for your organization it is probably better not to use any public certificates for OpenVPN but create your own CA and only accept certificates issued by this CA. This is actually the way proposed in the OpenVPN Howto. This way you are in full control of the certificates and even if some of the public CA's gets compromised and issues ...


3

Assuming you are concerned about privacy and also assuming you are talking about client web traffic you may also want to consider other ways in which your location or identity may be leaking out. Some of which include: IPv6 traffic not forwarded through the VPN which may provide geolocation Cookies from primary website Third-party Cookies Cookie-like ...


3

Assuming that the VPN service provides logs to law enforcement, then yes. Internet companies in the United States are required to adhere to U.S. data laws. That includes VPN services. That includes the providers used by private internet access. "Wait, what? But Mark Buffalo, Private Internet Access claims to not keep logs!" Yeah, that doesn't matter. PIA ...


2

Off the top of my head, you should be concerned about someone imitating the VPN server and then accepting the user's credentials, which they can replay. Does the VPN Client provide a warning that the cert cannot be verified? If so, then I suggest installing the cert on the machines as trusted, so that they do not get the warning. Then, teach the users ...


2

First, SSL stopped at version 3.0, which is massively flawed. TLS is currently at 1.2 (plus a lot of activity in the TLS 1.3 working group). This is generally a matter of acronym - hopefully when you say SSL encrypted, you actually mean TLS, and you specifically mean TLS 1.2 with AEAD ciphers. Second, for TLS of any type, both protocol version and cipher ...


1

Agree with what Drewbenn commented. It appears that your account was opened in a significantly different geographical location. Netflix recently made changes to what type of traffic they will permit to stream. Without knowing more about where you opened your account and where you now reside it's difficult to pin that down as the problem. See below: ...


1

You should check whether your current IP is on a proxy list. Since your IP address is assigned dynamically, it could be that the former owner got himself onto a proxy list - these lists get generically blocked by many pages. It is, however, easier, just to get a new IP and try again.


1

Banks do not block all VPN, but they might block known VPN which are advertised for anonymous surfing or similar. Because if such a VPN is advertised and used to hide the origin of the user then chances are high that it will be used for illegal activities too. This means an increased risk for the bank and it's users if the bank accepts orders for money ...


1

You need to hide your GPS info. My browser asked me permission to use GPS location services in my Macbook Pro when I was entering the whatismyipaddress URL that you are visiting, and I denied it. So the site is asking for that. So it believes I am in California, USA. Otherwise with GPS, the scripts/site would find out my true location. It could be also ...


1

There is probably SSL interception done by your company, i.e. man in the middle of SSL connections to analyze for malware and data leakage. Please contact the works system administrator for details on how to configure your system to include the necessary certificates. Apart from that make sure that you are even allowed to connect private PCs to the work ...


1

A proxy is better for that. I think if you configure this proxy but skip the SSL cert configuration you should get your answer.



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