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11

Very good question. Metadata is insanely powerful, and most people just don't realize how powerful it can be. Fortunately, it's not that hard to discover if you do a little digging into how technology and the internet works. I'm of the opinion that it's not very easy to hide online. In most cases, if you're a small fry, nobody's going to pay attention to ...


4

As far as I'm aware, Facebook don't actually block the new attempts from different IPs. Instead, they send an email to the registered email address with a notification that you logged into a new device, with a button to mark this as legitimate or malicious. The tracking appears to work not only via your IP, but also a long-term identification cookie and ...


4

Yes, the VPN provider is able to see your data. If the data are not encrypted (i.e. HTTPS) the provider will be able to get to the clear text and will also be able to manipulate the data. The usual protections of HTTPS apply, i.e. the provider will see which site you visit but not the clear text data itself because they are encrypted. The provider will also ...


3

It is not based on IP address and I was able to create two accounts: Create an account using your gmail account Go to incognito mode and create an account using 10 minute mail. (There was a 10 minute delay between the two steps) Mind you, you are gaming the system. It is ethically wrong.


2

The reason a computer would be listed in that section with an external IP is that the malicious device wants its traffic to look like it came from that other address. This is commonly done as part of a DDOS of other places, because the false source IP causes all of the returned traffic to head to that other address (in cases like amplification attacks this ...


2

The answer to your question is yes. They can see that you have used ports that are using for vpn services and they can see the encrypted traffic between you and the vpn provider.


2

VPN stands for Virtual Private Network. A real VPN works like a virtual network interface and transports any kind of traffic, i.e. TCP, UDP, ICMP.. . In this case it does not matter which protocol is used by the VPN itself. But note that some products are called VPN even if they are not handling all network protocols but only deal with some protocols. For ...


2

Here are some useful tips from Kaspersky Lab’s team of Internet security experts: Be aware Public Wi-Fi is inherently insecure – so be cautious. Remember – any device could be at risk Laptops, smartphones, and tablets are all susceptible to the wireless security risks. Treat all Wi-Fi links with suspicion Don’t just assume that the Wi-Fi link ...


2

In a default configuration, all traffic (including DNS) should be routed through an OpenVPN tunnel. However OpenVPN in itself does not provide mechanisms to enforce all traffic being routed via its tunnel and if an application or the operating system decides to route traffic via unencrypted interface, it is free to do so (as was the case with Windows 10 ...


2

I think you're using non standard terminologies and that is making things confusing for you. I'll define the terms here: Private key: a string that need to be kept secret, used in cryptographic operations to authenticate or encrypt Public key: a string that are mathematically bound to the private key, not a secret. Used in certificate to decrypt and ...


2

In short, No! They see the IP of the VPN service and probably log it, and all your traffic including URL's IPs to your sites are encrypted. But if the VPN service is not encrypted, then the ISP could in theory can see all your traffic. However, if you are using a split tunneling mode, then the ISP can see your DNS queries and surfing traffic. Read more ...


1

Short answer: No, that would not be a valid defense. Let's say you penetrate a site. The site views your IP and reports you to the authorities. They then ask your ISP who had that IP at that time, and will be directed to you. That's a lot of evidence to suggest that someone from your home and/or network hacked the site. Saying it wasn't you because your ...


1

Steffen already answered the VPN portion of this question, so I will answer the Skype portion of it. The latest versions of Skype have addressed "hiding your IP" The reality is, even if Skype doesn't tell me your IP address, I can open up Wireshark or TCPDUMP to figure out who you are. So let's jump back to "leakage." Define what you mean by leakage. For ...


1

It depends on what you are trying to achieve. If you are trying to prevent DNS leaks, DNSCrypt isn't what you need. DNSCrypt is intended to prevent DNS spoofing, which is quite different. You could think of it as Privacy vs Man-in-the-Middle. DNSCrypt is a protocol that authenticates communications between a DNS client and a DNS resolver. It prevents ...


1

You might have at least a compromised device sending packets with spoofed IP addresses in your internal network. Nowadays there is already malware that will make a device assume several IP addresses, or cycle through several IP addresses, to evade blacklisting/security measures activated from the victims. I would not blacklist a particular IP address; I ...


1

It depends. Facebook analyzes the locations from which you use to login from. Depending on where your new IP is located, Facebook may, or may not, give you access to your account. In the case Facebook finds the new location suspicious, it will use another mean to validate your identity. (E.g. an email to validate your attempt.) Once you validate that new ...


1

Yes, they need your plaintext password to make the VPN work, simply because their service is badly configured. They shouldn't need your password in plaintext. The problem is that they use your plaintext password in their authentication procedure. When a new user creates an account, the VPN provider should properly hash their password and use that hash to ...


1

That's not the problem. Some people use VPNs for privacy (which is arguably misguided, as a VPN is a remote network connectivity tool and not a privacy tool, but that's an argument for another day) and having DNS queries leak out of the non-VPN connection is a concern in that scenario. Say, for example, I live in an oppressive regime with little regard for ...



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