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9

I can understand why your IT Manager is upset. How would you feel if some one, without your consent, bridged an unknown network with your home network? You arguably bypassed any controls they had in place and bridged a completely foreign network with that of (what I can only assume is) a multi million dollar corporation. What are the security risks of ...


4

Though you might expect this if traveling to certain countries, this question hinges on whether we should trust the authorities (or a specific person, still an opinion) and somewhat separately known capabilities (which are broad). An essential answer is the risk you're willing to accept. You could say you can't trust your device if it ever leaves your ...


3

Unfortunately I would have to agree with the poster named "Freedom" who has made the observation that you cannot trust U.S.-manufacturered, -owned or -designed systems. The Snowden revelations proved far beyond a reasonable doubt that not only the NSA (but a long list of other "alphabet-soup" U.S. surveillance state entities), long ago declared war against ...


3

Hi I'm the developer who wrote VyprVPN for Mac. It looks like you've still got one of our software components installed. Macintosh applications that needs to alter your system, including VyprVPN, uses something called a "privileged helper tool” aka a system daemon. We install a helper tool with the user's permission, using the appropriate Apple API for this ...


2

I work for ExpressVPN and have investigated this issue. Here are our findings: No, there is NO link between ExpressVPN and Taboola. I believe what you’re seeing in the screenshot is a case of mistaken identities. Here’s one sign that something is wrong in the screenshot: the ‘remote address’ for a listening socket in process explorer should always be shown ...


2

Is this kind of activity normal in VPN providers? they are legally registered company, claim that respect privacy... That the domain names begin on dl. (short for "download") sounds like they are checking for updates, configuration files or whatever. That they do it every seconds seems like a waste with Resources, but I Think they do it that way ...


2

Short answer: Is not unsafe. Long answer: The option of using a certificate or password to authenticate the client does not change the traffic encryption. It's only used in the first stage of the VPN connection. The server and client will negotiate the session keys only after authenticating the user, independent of the use of certificate or password. If ...


2

Yes the risk is very big. NSA is know to put spyware on hardware before shipping (see here), NSA is know to ignore the US constitutions and spy on calls and internet activity of US citizens so do you really think they care about foreigners? If they seize your laptop and you ever get your hands back on it, throw it on the trash its junk now. I can bet ...


2

It depends on how the VPN is set up. One of the possible setups is the following: VPN connection to allow remote access to internal network servers of the company, but all other traffic is direct from you to the internet (so not routed through the VPN). All traffic is routed through the VPN making all traffic between you and the company secure. All other ...


2

What is your threat model ? Why do you want to use the VPN ? You seem to think that a VPN is the silver bullet for privacy (thanks to all these ads to fool naive users, even though these VPN providers will probably be the first ones to hand over your data in case of a government/attorney request). Sorry to disappoint you, it is not. All the VPN does is ...


1

Assuming that your work VPN routes all of your Internet traffic (which is not always true as others have mentioned), your workplace can still monitor and log your activity if they desire to, though anyone sniffing between you and your workplace will only see encrypted data. The appeal of third-party VPNs is that many promise to keep minimal to no logs of ...


1

The traffic from your remote location to your company will be secured in a tunnel (in a typical VPN scenario). But the traffic from your company to the final destination will not be in a tunnel. Your company and any point between the company and the target can have access to your traffic. If you are ok with your company having access to all your personal ...


1

I don't think you can look at connections and, by inspecting the packets, determine that a VPN is in use. VPNs are meant to look like regular connections. The only solution I know of is one that blacklists IP addresses belonging to known VPN providers. That can be used effectively though it is a bit of an arms race as VPN providers try to get new addresses ...


1

They cannot infer it from the technical analysis of their communication with you. All they see is TCP datagrams in IP packets, their characteristics shouldn't be impacted too much by your mode of connection (the MTU of the connection might be, but that's a pretty weak correlation).



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