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PPTP is not secure How can I tell if a PPTP tunnel is secure? If you want to browse the Internet without being monitored then use a program like OpenVPN. Please see the comment below your question as it is important.


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Assuming that your work VPN routes all of your Internet traffic (which is not always true as others have mentioned), your workplace can still monitor and log your activity if they desire to, though anyone sniffing between you and your workplace will only see encrypted data. The appeal of third-party VPNs is that many promise to keep minimal to no logs of ...


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It depends on how the VPN is set up. One of the possible setups is the following: VPN connection to allow remote access to internal network servers of the company, but all other traffic is direct from you to the internet (so not routed through the VPN). All traffic is routed through the VPN making all traffic between you and the company secure. All other ...


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The traffic from your remote location to your company will be secured in a tunnel (in a typical VPN scenario). But the traffic from your company to the final destination will not be in a tunnel. Your company and any point between the company and the target can have access to your traffic. If you are ok with your company having access to all your personal ...


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Hi I'm the developer who wrote VyprVPN for Mac. It looks like you've still got one of our software components installed. Macintosh applications that needs to alter your system, including VyprVPN, uses something called a "privileged helper tool” aka a system daemon. We install a helper tool with the user's permission, using the appropriate Apple API for this ...


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I work for ExpressVPN and have investigated this issue. Here are our findings: No, there is NO link between ExpressVPN and Taboola. I believe what you’re seeing in the screenshot is a case of mistaken identities. Here’s one sign that something is wrong in the screenshot: the ‘remote address’ for a listening socket in process explorer should always be shown ...


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Is this kind of activity normal in VPN providers? they are legally registered company, claim that respect privacy... That the domain names begin on dl. (short for "download") sounds like they are checking for updates, configuration files or whatever. That they do it every seconds seems like a waste with Resources, but I Think they do it that way ...


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Unfortunately I would have to agree with the poster named "Freedom" who has made the observation that you cannot trust U.S.-manufacturered, -owned or -designed systems. The Snowden revelations proved far beyond a reasonable doubt that not only the NSA (but a long list of other "alphabet-soup" U.S. surveillance state entities), long ago declared war against ...


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I can understand why your IT Manager is upset. How would you feel if some one, without your consent, bridged an unknown network with your home network? You arguably bypassed any controls they had in place and bridged a completely foreign network with that of (what I can only assume is) a multi million dollar corporation. What are the security risks of ...


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It really depends on the work environment. And this has to be indicated so up front. If you are in a low grade security environment with BYOD policies in place, then it should be fine. Take the lead from the upper layers. If they're non plussed about security, then fine, they should be cognizant and comfortable with the disruption. On the other hand, ...


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Yes the risk is very big. NSA is know to put spyware on hardware before shipping (see here), NSA is know to ignore the US constitutions and spy on calls and internet activity of US citizens so do you really think they care about foreigners? If they seize your laptop and you ever get your hands back on it, throw it on the trash its junk now. I can bet ...


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Though you might expect this if traveling to certain countries, this question hinges on whether we should trust the authorities (or a specific person, still an opinion) and somewhat separately known capabilities (which are broad). An essential answer is the risk you're willing to accept. You could say you can't trust your device if it ever leaves your ...


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I don't think you can look at connections and, by inspecting the packets, determine that a VPN is in use. VPNs are meant to look like regular connections. The only solution I know of is one that blacklists IP addresses belonging to known VPN providers. That can be used effectively though it is a bit of an arms race as VPN providers try to get new addresses ...


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The site cannot tell directly by looking at your communication channel as they will always see the same connection from the VPN provider so TCP fingerprinting will not work. But if the site was very determined and had many data points to correlate, they may be able to notice some differences in your connections and create fingerprints for the different ...


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They cannot infer it from the technical analysis of their communication with you. All they see is TCP datagrams in IP packets, their characteristics shouldn't be impacted too much by your mode of connection (the MTU of the connection might be, but that's a pretty weak correlation).


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Short answer, I do not think that any society will prosecute anyone for removing illegal content. You are just cleaning some mess, that's all you are doing. Would you talk about uploading new content of the same kind, creating new accounts for such usage, etc., then anonymity would be preferable. But here you are just cleaning your account. From a more ...


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It never hurts to anonymize the traffic. Chances are nothing is going to happen either way, but if you do login hide the current IP address. It would depend on log retention length and a LOT of other factors.


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Short answer: Is not unsafe. Long answer: The option of using a certificate or password to authenticate the client does not change the traffic encryption. It's only used in the first stage of the VPN connection. The server and client will negotiate the session keys only after authenticating the user, independent of the use of certificate or password. If ...


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This is not technical security, but when using a VPN you may attract unwanted attention on your activity. I have to find the exact source of a case I read about where someone performing illegal activities was detected because he was the only one on the whole network using TOR. EDIT: This is not the example I was looking for but close enough: Tor User ...


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Yes, it could be a disadvantage. What is boils down to is how much you trust the VPN provider. For most secure protocols, using a VPN will be just as secure because your communications are encrypted by the protocol. If there was a MITM at the other end of the VPN connection they would not be able to do much (apart from a side channel attack, which are ...


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With the hype that has surrounded VPNs historically, the potential pitfalls or "weak spots" in the VPN model can be easy to forget. These four concerns with VPN solutions are often raised. VPNs require an in-depth understanding of public network security issues and proper deployment of precautions. The availability and performance of an organization's ...


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The main problem I've found is: when you open a VPN connection all apps in your machine may use that VPN. If you have more than one user executing apps in the server that opens a VPN connection, you have a very important hole of security. VPN solutions are great, but they must be combined with another type of security barrier to use them.


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Trust is obviously key, since you are trading trust in your local connectivity (whatever path your connection takes through your local ISP, the coffee house wifi, etc) for trusting the connectivity of the VPN service and their internet path. If it's a large and reputable VPN provider compared to a coffee house wifi, then you are probably going in the right ...


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A VPN maskerade you real IP by using the VPN IP instead. The VPN IP is shared by an unknown number of persons, and its usage is public as long as the person subscribe a contract to the VPN provide. Therefore, by using a VPN: You open yourself to attacks such as IP spoofing, it will be trivial for someone else to use the very same IP address than you, ...


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You may be interested in reading the following document: http://fish2.com/ipmi/bp.pdf. Moreover, I encourage you to read the other documentation made by this security researcher on IPMI which are very interesting and well written.



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