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0

Conceptually you can think of TOR as a bunch of VPNs where you can set rules as to how the TOR nodes are chained together to transport your traffic from your computer to the final web site you want to visit. When your browser talks (sends IP packets) to a VPN or TOR, it encrypts those packets. You can think of a normal unencrypted packet as a postcard where ...


3

how difficult is it for an ISP to know that a user is using VPN Actual implementations of VPN vary and don't always mean that the user always hits the same IP address. But still an ISP or anybody else having access to their infrastructure could detect atypical traffic patterns (like nearly no web access but lots of other traffic) and thus conclude the ...


2

You're probably fine. SSH key-based login is designed to work over untrusted networks, without exposing key data - a VPN, even one which you don't control, doesn't change this. At no point in the sign-in process is the whole private key sent across the network - this would be a massive flaw in the system if it was the case, and would make SSH key login ...


1

Yes but this is not an issue with the VPN protocol per se its more an issue with data leakage of traffic exiting through that connection. Specifically there are many ways in which geolocation can be done against the client via a number of protocols. In your case the most relevant one would be using client-side javascript to capture the wireless SSID and ...


2

Here are some useful tips from Kaspersky Lab’s team of Internet security experts: Be aware Public Wi-Fi is inherently insecure – so be cautious. Remember – any device could be at risk Laptops, smartphones, and tablets are all susceptible to the wireless security risks. Treat all Wi-Fi links with suspicion Don’t just assume that the Wi-Fi link ...


0

I've had this problem too. I don't believe OpenVPN alone changes the DNS without being told. If you're on Windows I recommend this, If you're using a Linux machine just change the DNS in "/etc/resolv.conf".


2

In a default configuration, all traffic (including DNS) should be routed through an OpenVPN tunnel. However OpenVPN in itself does not provide mechanisms to enforce all traffic being routed via its tunnel and if an application or the operating system decides to route traffic via unencrypted interface, it is free to do so (as was the case with Windows 10 ...


3

It is not based on IP address and I was able to create two accounts: Create an account using your gmail account Go to incognito mode and create an account using 10 minute mail. (There was a 10 minute delay between the two steps) Mind you, you are gaming the system. It is ethically wrong.


4

Yes, the VPN provider is able to see your data. If the data are not encrypted (i.e. HTTPS) the provider will be able to get to the clear text and will also be able to manipulate the data. The usual protections of HTTPS apply, i.e. the provider will see which site you visit but not the clear text data itself because they are encrypted. The provider will also ...


0

you can always use the "youtube" excuse. To many users, to much content, impossible to manage, Heres our disclaimer of our lack of control of data, we exempt ourselves from resposibility, Then look official, with complaint departments etc. To better clarify though; 2 points are needed. 1. nature of crime. 2. Country of server Its all about perception, ...


0

It depends a lot of the country where the server is and the jurisdiction there. But even in a country that would follow such cases it depends on the acual law itself. For example you mostly have to have a certain standard of security for you services. If you can prove that you have the usual security standard you won´t get punished (anonymous VPN does not ...


1

Short answer: No, that would not be a valid defense. Let's say you penetrate a site. The site views your IP and reports you to the authorities. They then ask your ISP who had that IP at that time, and will be directed to you. That's a lot of evidence to suggest that someone from your home and/or network hacked the site. Saying it wasn't you because your ...


2

I think you're using non standard terminologies and that is making things confusing for you. I'll define the terms here: Private key: a string that need to be kept secret, used in cryptographic operations to authenticate or encrypt Public key: a string that are mathematically bound to the private key, not a secret. Used in certificate to decrypt and ...


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All the cert and keys you are presenting are necessary information for a working openvpn service for the client side. It is nothing wrong to give them in public. The only security weakness is the username:password (if it is weak) and your IP (ddos attacks).


2

In short, No! They see the IP of the VPN service and probably log it, and all your traffic including URL's IPs to your sites are encrypted. But if the VPN service is not encrypted, then the ISP could in theory can see all your traffic. However, if you are using a split tunneling mode, then the ISP can see your DNS queries and surfing traffic. Read more ...


0

Which ISP do you mean? ISP connected directly to your computer? No, because your traffic is encapsulated. ISP of your VPN server? Yes, the ISP will know the destination IP address. In my opinion, try to use anonymity tools such as Tor or anonymous proxy.


1

Steffen already answered the VPN portion of this question, so I will answer the Skype portion of it. The latest versions of Skype have addressed "hiding your IP" The reality is, even if Skype doesn't tell me your IP address, I can open up Wireshark or TCPDUMP to figure out who you are. So let's jump back to "leakage." Define what you mean by leakage. For ...


2

VPN stands for Virtual Private Network. A real VPN works like a virtual network interface and transports any kind of traffic, i.e. TCP, UDP, ICMP.. . In this case it does not matter which protocol is used by the VPN itself. But note that some products are called VPN even if they are not handling all network protocols but only deal with some protocols. For ...


0

Your rpi interface is not directly connected to the Internet, and thus the warning does not apply. You are behind a modem/NAT, as you say your are forwarding the OpenVPN port. So the other ports are firewalled e.g. inaccessible. The problem here would be if you had your rpi like my lamobo R1, which is the router for the Internet, and the machine doing ...


0

VPN secures your traffic from people that can't get into your VPN service provider's system, legally or not. Law enforcements can issue lawful warrants to intercept your VPN communications, and hackers may be able to hack into VPN provider's internal control system. VPN employees can be bribed or they may fall into social engineering, these risks are no ...


0

You can feel reasonably secure, but it's important to note that a VPN isn't a one-stop-shop. It's not bulletproof and if you do something that compromises your security, the use of a VPN is almost null and void. VPNs aim to secure your internet traffic from anyone that could be construed as malicious. In the case of illegal P2P transfers, a VPN helps obscure ...


-1

Safer than not using a VPN. As long as the p2p file sharing are files that you have rights to and the pr0n watching is 18-and-over the VPN will work fine! Yes, you are correct and the VPN will protect your privacy and online surfing as you describe. If you don't have your own server, a pay-to-play VPN is money well spent.


1

It depends on what you are trying to achieve. If you are trying to prevent DNS leaks, DNSCrypt isn't what you need. DNSCrypt is intended to prevent DNS spoofing, which is quite different. You could think of it as Privacy vs Man-in-the-Middle. DNSCrypt is a protocol that authenticates communications between a DNS client and a DNS resolver. It prevents ...


-1

Your router is owned/pwned, I'm afraid. Do a strict MAC filter like "denied unless whitelisted", and - arm some NMAP's to shut the SoB down. If the ISP is not doing anything - help yourself... You have notified them


1

You might have at least a compromised device sending packets with spoofed IP addresses in your internal network. Nowadays there is already malware that will make a device assume several IP addresses, or cycle through several IP addresses, to evade blacklisting/security measures activated from the victims. I would not blacklist a particular IP address; I ...


2

The reason a computer would be listed in that section with an external IP is that the malicious device wants its traffic to look like it came from that other address. This is commonly done as part of a DDOS of other places, because the false source IP causes all of the returned traffic to head to that other address (in cases like amplification attacks this ...


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Use Tor. Get into the habit of using tor. On my system, I have a tor service running 24/7. The advantage of this is that even if anything malicious does happen and they trace back to everyone who was using tor, you have plausable deniability. Plus, tor is much more popular than whatever VPN provider you're using. It's also harder to detect. You can use ...


2

The answer to your question is yes. They can see that you have used ports that are using for vpn services and they can see the encrypted traffic between you and the vpn provider.



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