Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

A Virtual Private Network on an end-user device (a PC for instance) is just that: a network which comes in addition to the ones you already have and which binds your client to a remote server/network though an encrypted tunnel. It is set up after having received the authorization to do so in some way. This is usually bundled with the server/client solution ...


0

The authentication is ultimately handled by the server, who receives a set of information which he assesses. This will usually be user credentials (which are checked against a LDAP or similar system) and, in the case you described, something which checks is the client is authorized to connect. This can be a certificate presented by the client (the idea ...


-3

When you are using public wifi , You might put your personal information into the hands of hackers, It can be your work place, Airports, Hotels, shpping centers. They can sniff on your connection and see what you are doing, they can steal your credit card details, Your passwords and even they can access your personal data. But there is a always a way, The ...


0

As @bonsaiviking commented, this is a form of DNS Registry Spam, and unfortunately it is very easy to do. The upside is, it's not an attack on your domain, and it shouldn't cause anyone actual problems (unless you are trying to sift through DNS records...) The example of google.com given at the razzed.com link is as follows: whois google.com Whois ...


1

Remember that VPNs just encrypt your communications between point A and B. In other words, your connection is confidential but not necessarily private. Assuming that you are using a VPN that has no known vulnerabilities (i.e. logjam) even if you chained VPNs - which would be much effort for little gain - there are a few scenarios where privacy might be ...


0

Technically, if ZenMate is considered safe to use, then cannot see the communication. Etisalat, like any other ISP, will see that you made a VPN connection to a particular service. If ZenMate has no privacy issues (leaking of meta data, DNS queries, you installed backdoored version, ...), then an ISP will not know what data you're sending and receiving ...


3

I'm not sure if this is really an information security question per se or more of one about general networking; but here goes: If you have a number of dynamic IPs connecting to a client that requires whitelisting, this will lead to constantly having to ping the client to update the ACLs to allow IPs as they change. While on modern residential connections ...


0

One resource I like specifically for journalists is EFF Surveillance Self-Defence (https://ssd.eff.org/en/playlist/journalist-move) Their resources come in parts, simplified it looks like this: Threat modelling. - Who is likely to be interested in monitoring your or uncovering your identity. How to communicate with others. - Voice, e-mail, Text Messages, ...


1

(PS: This post is just a general discussion. I am in no ways enticing anyone to commit any crime!) In order to be anonymous you really have to consider other things too, other than just using some tools while browsing the internet. Tor or VPN might help you to anonymize your identity online but have you considered being anonymous in your real(Offline) life. ...


1

From Google's support pages: How Maps gets location info When you click Location on your computer, Maps uses different sources to try to get an accurate read on your location. This info might come from: Your computer's web browser location info Your phone's location, if you are a Location History user To elaborate on that a bit, ...


5

Yes, that's correct. VPN B will see VPN A IP VPN A will see your external IP. Because the router will establish a connection to VPN , all packets forwarded by the router (so packets coming from his computer MAC) will be forwarded through VPN A. In order to be routable on the internet, the VPN provider will masquerade (NAT) all outgoing packets with his ...


4

They can't per se. But they can collect a list of the most popular known public VPN services and check if your IP matches with one of those VPN services. Whether they actually do that, I don't know.


1

I suggest the following: Centralized Antivirus/Malware Management (Endpoint Security) Some sort of physical appliance for threat management-like a Dell Sonicwall. Enable Syn Flood protection at the very least. Utilize this appliance for secured VPN access. Enable net flow to gather view of Internet traffic on LAN. Audit all systems on network if possible, ...


3

As you mention, you should definitely setup "split tunnel" VPN, wherein traffic only traverses the VPN when it needs to -- other traffic goes over the internet. That is likely the simplest solution to your issue. However, the caveat is that these infected computers can still be used as a hop-off point to access resources on your VPN; so you can have a ...


1

AES-256 is the most secure publicly known algorithm. It is however probable, that there exist more secure algorithms in the military use. From the above list, OFB will be the most secure and also the least CPU intensive. Here you have some explanation about these modes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Block_cipher_mode_of_operation


2

Tor could be a solution for you, if you could compromise some of the browsing speed. Tor tries to implement many countermeasures for your anonymity theft. I would recommend that just using Tor is not enough please read the Tor FAQ for further details. Update: Apart from that I would say you have to change your browsing habits too in order to stay ...


0

@raz is right, but would add: The DNS requests could be resolved on the company network, so the network admins can see you want the address of www.example.com, even if the traffic later is not routed through their network. (you can set up your VPN to so that the 'resolver' is on the other side of the tunnel, then the company can no longer see the DNS ...


1

The two answers provided by Jeroen and Orny are good, informative answers that are perfectly accurate. Websites can certainly track you with these sophisticated tracking mechanisms. Whether they actually do this is a different matter. There's little incentive for them to do so since the majority of users aren't using incognito mode, or other means of ...


2

The most likely case is that the VPN is setup to only send traffic to/from the private network's subnet. So normal web traffic would go through your normal network interface. While going to fileshare.company.net will resolve to a private network that is only reachable through the VPN. Most companies don't want/force all of an employee's traffic through ...


5

Sign out of Junos to keep your traffic off their network, there is no need to uninstall the VPN client completely. If you had signed in to Junos, it was routing all your network traffic through their VPN. Although you were on your own Wifi, when you logged in to Junos, it would have redirected all your traffic into their VPN. There is a chance that they ...


1

Consequences depend on, who do you want do prevent from tracking you: adversiters and small/poor site owners - sleep safe. big site owners, that can afford Big Data (eg. Yahoo) - they can time-correlate your visits, but rather for statistics, UX analysis etc., than personally. local Police or other local forces - they can possibly deanonymize you, but ...


7

By using incognito mode and using a VPN you are masking two of your fingerprints: Cookies IP Address These are the most common techniques used by websites to identify users today. There is much more information websites can get from your browser to use to identify you. Such as: User Agent HTTP_ACCEPT Headers Browser Plugins Time Zone Screen Size and ...


2

It could still identify you as it looks at a lot of details such as: User-Agent Timezone Browser plugins HTTP_ACCEPT Headers Screen size and color depth System fonts Cookies (which you said you'd delete) Please have a look at https://panopticlick.eff.org and test how "unique" your device / browser is. Hope this gives you some insight in correlating data ...


1

I believe this must be possible since its the same situation when a user stops paying for their service, they have to be able to deny the service to those who stop paying. Maybe they dont have the protocols in place to assert an attacker or an abuser deserves to be denied of their service, but that is a different situation. The technical means must be in ...


0

If the adversary that had installed the keylogger or screen reader were accessing them from another device on LAN, using a VPN could protect you. You would need firewall rules that allowed traffic only via the VPN tunnel, and did not allow connections to other devices on LAN. Even if the adversary could intercept on LAN, they would see only encrypted VPN ...


1

VPNs are not going to provide you any protection against keylogging/screen grabbing malware, all a VPN does is encrypt traffic between one point and another. Once the traffic exits the VPN it will then continue onto its destination whether that is a legitimate system or a hackers command and control system. It will not prevent you from getting malware in the ...


0

All enterprise VPN systems I have experience with have logging which will include detail as to who is connecting/disconnecting, the IP address of the client, how much traffic was passed and more. Logging of this information is configurable... could be all of this, could be none of it.


0

Almost certainly. Someone along the line they get your username so that they can validate your RSA token. You likely type this in (or did during installation). They log that. Being network and security software, I suspect the VPN logs all sorts of stuff including your originating IP address, your VPN IP address, summary stats of network traffic, etc...



Top 50 recent answers are included