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1

There do seem to be these two uses of the term VPN. Obviously the most important bit is Privacy - and many people (myself included) can only accept privacy exists if there is encryption, but as R15 mentioned, MPLS providers typically call their service VPN but rarely have encryption enabled. They rely on routing segregation. It can be safe for some ...


1

When you're using Aggressive mode, the authentication hash, (pre-shared key) is transmitted as response to the initial packet of the vpn client that wants to establish an IPSec Tunnel. The hash (pre shared key) is not encrypted. If an attacker can capture these session packets, they can run an attack to recover the PSK. The attack only affects aggressive ...


3

SFTP (as in, file transfer over an SSH tunnel) provides end-to-end encryption, plus verification of the server's identity. FTP over VPN provides encryption from your computer to the VPN endpoint, and no verification of the server's identity. If the VPN endpoint is the same computer as the FTP server, then FTP over VPN is as secure as SFTP. In any other ...


1

Barring unforeseen weaknesses in protocols or implementations of your VPN service, this should give you a reasonable expectation of privacy. All of your traffic that traverses the VPN will be encrypted from your system to the VPN provider. At that point it will travel normally. To your specific question of emails and login details, those should also be ...


1

You're assuming the attacker has knowledge of both devices. The particular address you've listed is no stranger to random attacks. SANS Internet Storm Center lists it, it has appeared on other watch lists as well. One can conclude that this is either part of a botnet or some other automated scanning/hacker/badguy machine. Botnets, compromised machines, ...


0

One likely possibility is that they were simply scanning all IP addresses for that particular service and hit both of your systems. ZMap claims to be able to scan the entire IPv4 space in under 45 minutes.


0

If the local network management has control over your client machine, you have no sure way (you can't guarantee, what type of watching software will they use). If they don't: practically, you have to Hide your traffic (to protect from watching on the routers) Hide your browsing history. For (1) the best solution if you have a remote "helper", ...


1

Also most information has to be displayed somewhere, somehow and at sometime. How would you do this without an endpoint? Maybe send it everywhere rather than to one particular host? Why not just use your byod and 4G connection for yourself. Of course, if said network operators are themselves being rather naughty, then they can do your job for you.


0

One reason why spear-phishing is so successful on the higher ups in companies... Ahem. Anyway, OpenDNS is advertised as a means protecting companies against malware attack and blocking use of unsavory websites that can lead to harrassment lawsuits (business level). The blocked sites are logged on OpenDNS, so you probably tripped the logging by the ...


1

What can IT see and log? Theoretically speaking, everything, assuming that IT set up and configured your computer for you. No anonymity software will protect you if you cannot trust the computer that you are using. VPN will protect you if you cannot trust the network, but it will do nothing for you if you can't trust your computer. VPN scrambles ...


3

A VPN or an anonymity network such as TOR can hide the details of your activity from your network's owner, although the fact that you are using TOR or a VPN is not hidden (and may in and of itself be considered suspicious activity). You need to be careful when setting this up, though, since mistakes such as DNS leakage (where your DNS queries go out over ...


1

ISAKMP can be viewed as the conception framework and IKE as the concrete realization of ISAKMP. The actual implementation of IKE then uses both Oakley and SKEME to achieve its goals (all implementation but cisco one, as it doesn't use nor Oakley nor SKEME, then the confusion with ISAKMP in the cisco world, correct me if I'm wrong). in the development world, ...


0

Yes although not ideal, you can use obfuscated bridges to hide the fact that you're using tor from your ISP, although there are more things you must do to prevent them from recognizing the traffic when they do deep packet inspection and you can use tor as system wide proxy with software such a proxychains, you can also manually configure services or ...


0

This will depend on the type of VPN. Cisco anyconnect normally uses strong cryptography to create a tunnel through which all your traffic is routed. This means that the person who has control of the VPN end-point will be able to view what you are visiting. Most likely when you are using the Wifi, there is either deep packet inspection or a proxy which is ...


0

The VPN operator can track and record what websites you visit while you're using the VPN if they want to, and you'd have to check their policies to see what they actually do. If everything is set up properly, your wifi provider can only see that you're sending encrypted data to and from the VPN, but can't see what pages you're visiting. If you're connected ...


0

Although this part is probably obvious, I did not see this stated in any of the other answers. All the information you enter into the form can be potentially obtained (depending on how the form is coded) at the very least by the person who receives the form. This is why it is good to use different passwords for different sites (e.g. the owner of one site ...


1

If you connect and submit a form using your VPN connection, the site will get your VPN address, not your main IP address. But with a little javascript file they can get a lot of information about you: Browser type, version and revision All plugins installed You operational system Screen size and depth If they succesfully exploit DNS Leak, or put Flash ...


1

Submitting a form is no different from browsing a site. It is, in fact, submitted by the exact same or very similar kind of request to the one used to get the website in the first place.


0

If you have a VPN tunnel between A and B, that will allow those two servers to have a conversation private from others on the LAN. It does not prevent access to other resources on the LAN by A or B. For that you'd want to look into VLAN tagging or other router based access controls.


2

If you control the network, there really isn't an advantage (under almost any circumstances). What a VPN does is simulate having a leased line from your computer to the network the VPN server is on. If you are already on that network, there is literally no advantage (unless you enjoy encryption overhead). There is one main exception: if you control the ...


0

The advantages of using a VPN is that content you access on the internet and anything sent to a website is encrypted and routed through vpn. When a connection is encrypted it stops people from monitoring your connection. So all data send to website can't be read by anyone except the VPN provider. When a connection is not encrypted a attacker could ...


0

No answer The answer to your question is dependent on which cloud storage provider you are talking about, there is no official "cloud storage security layer" shared across all providers. The best way to secure cloud data is still an open ended question, so the different attempts at it are myriad.


1

To be honest, I think the BEST ANSWER can be found here: Best practices for Tor use, in light of released NSA slides This guy details /everything/ in so many ways.


4

In general I'd say you need to do more than just use a VPN. What VPNs do: VPNs solve a couple of fairly specific problems: Your local ISP (Internet Service Provider) and network provider can see all your unencrypted traffic. This could be groups like your school, work place or whoever is running the WiFi[1] at your local cafe. A VPN encrypts all the ...


1

In the diagram above, the encryption exists between you and the VPN server. Past the VPN server it is no longer encrypted. A VPN is a way to send traffic over a public connection and still have a reasonable expectation of privacy. The typical use case for them is either protecting your privacy or thwarting geoIP based filtering. However, like with any ...


0

While not a complete solution, with the tour browser bundle running, on a Linux system, you can invoke command line utilities proceeded by the command "torsocks" to make the command argument go through the all ready running tor demon. Be careful though. As other posters have said, a distro like Tails, or encapsulating everything in a VM forced to go through ...


0

Using an offshore VPN can help you to hide your real identity. Every site you visit will see the IP of the VPN-Server instead of your real IP. On most VPN-Services, your IP isn't dedicated to a single user, which make it harder to identify a special customer. But this is more related to the sites you're using, because the owner of the site can see and ...


5

Using a VPN in and of itself isn't going to stop people who want to trace specific activities on-line. A VPN encrypts the traffic from your machine to the exit point of the VPN network. So what it protects you from is someone trying to look at your network traffic if they sit between you and your VPN provider (for example a correctly set-up VPN should ...


2

The security provided by Remote Desktop applications are often not top-notch, and can be broken with a little persistence. VPN offers and additional level of security, as data traveling to the private network is encrypted before it hits the Internet, and decrypted once it reaches the private network. This additional level of security may be a plus for most, ...


1

I will restrict this to only gateway to gateway VPNs - there are additional potentially higher risk considerations for client to gateway VPNs. A connection to the Internet will be via an ISP and therefore the end points of a route between two organisations will generally be known; if the ISP(s) have implemented controls that provide confidence that their ...


0

If you believe that the traffic through the ISP is safe enough to protect your data then why do you use https in facebook and gmail? simple http shall do, right? You have to understand so many attacks including sniffing and tampering of data in order to understand the concept more clear. Read this to understand why you are recommeneded to use https always. ...


1

The internet is a mesh of telecommunications lines run by different companies which are leased by ISPs which use them to sent traffic from customer to customer. Any one of the ISPs or telecommunications companies can sniff the traffic that goes over their lines or network devices in ways you cannot detect. Some governments have forced (or paid) ISPs to ...


-1

It's all based on the assumption you make being false. Which in practice is the good one to make. An ISP jobs is to to move packets fast and cheaply. Ensuring their security (integrity, confidentiality) is not something they can do without using what you would call VPN technologies. And if you're not paying for it, they sure ain't doing it.


0

Speaking as someone who's set up such a system, my recommendation is that you simply use the Tails distro, possibly in a virtualized environment. It's much easier, and the Tails developers have already put in the effort of looking for ways that data can leak. If you want to set things up yourself, study Tails and see how it handles things. You'll ...


0

One of the easiest ways to do this, is through the use of visualization. Where your Host machine runs the TOR client, and starts the virtual environment. Details of this on the tor.stackexchange.com Example post : Running a virtual machine (VM) that can only connect through Tor This allows you to run apps and sessions inside your virtual environment just ...



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