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1

If you use VPN you can tunnel all traffic including DNS through the tunnel, and then the university won't see what you're doing online. They can see the tunnel though. What you search by Google HTTPS should be encrypted, even when not over VPN. The keywords in the URL should appear encrypted in the logs. This is how I understand it, but I haven't tested ...


1

It depends. If you are using their DNS server and they are logging which IP is assigned to you (IPs can be assigned based on MAC address by the dhcp server) then they can see what sites you visit even when using a VPN solution. They should however be unable to see what you are searching for as this will be tunnelled. Best is to use a DNS outside their ...


0

Only if you distrust the other users of your home network. I mean, kids these days, one minute you're teaching them to ride a bicycle, the next they're poisoning your ARP cache and sniffing your traffic.


-1

Depends on Lan, but if you talking about home router(dlink, asus, linksys, etc) based lan. I would say Yes it adds security.(but highly depends on your use case) Recent years there was a lot vulnerabilities in routers found, and if you did't flashed router for long time you at risk. As example 'The Moon' worm infects Linksys routers So router is one of first ...


2

Although it indeed adds some crypto to your LAN communication, in the case of a home user there is generally no benefit from doing it. Furthermore, that would generate bandwidth and resources overrun.


0

Not unless they join your domain and GP is enforced. Though you can't really enforce this. So people which are not on the domain you'll have no control of. I don't know of any software which does though. If they are on the domain, you'll need FULL permissions to your company data and you'll have to know every known hash of your company data. If they modify ...


0

to elaborate more a VPN is a virtual Network that is used to hide IP address of the attacker. I wouldn't agree with that. A VPN is not about hiding an IP address. This may be an side-effect, but normally one would use a VPN to (securely) connect to another network from the "outside", e.g. the Internet. Note, however, that VPN is not referring to a ...


0

Not for nothing, but OS X 10.6.x+ will allow you to connect to multiple IPSec VPNs at once. As for passing ALL traffic through a VPN tunnel, yes, this is the default behavior, although Cisco (and I'm certain the same exists for other vendors such as Juniper, etc.) has a technique called "split-tunneling" where only some of your traffic is passed through the ...


1

The idea of PFS is that not all keys are equal, when considering risks of ulterior theft. A private key stored in a file may be stolen afterwards, e.g. if the disk fails and is carelessly discarded. On the other hand, a key which resides in RAM only disappears when the machine is shut down or rebooted, and thus is unlikely to be recovered by an hostile ...


0

Right, the corporate network admins implement a man-in-the-middle attack against the TLS client with their own CA so that they can see what's leaving their network. They will probably have a device that will create a certificate on the fly that is valid for gmail.com when you visit gmail.com. The reason they do this isn't to play Dr. Evil, it's so they can ...


0

Depending on the configuration of the network that you're on, it may be possible for administrators to view the contents of HTTPS connections (and possibly VPNs). It is obviously possible to intercept traffic on the network, but the usual problem is that they can't issue valid certificates for all the sites that you visit, so you would see a lot of ...


1

You could configure pwnat but you need control of both sides to negotiate the UDP hole punch. Now I want some crazy MSF developer to add this functionality to Meterpreter. Similar techniques include tools like matahari (or, older, pbounce) and particular networks such as iodine (DNS) or onioncat (Tor nodes). If I were you, my phone would be a quick hotspot ...


0

When you connect to a VPN, you are connecting to private network, but your network is only private from the greater network/Internet. Inside of the network, you have no additional protections - you are not private to the other members of the network. You can still use HTTPS/TLS/SSL to encrypt your connection from your PC to the server you want to connect ...


2

Once you connect to a VPN service, they can record what they wish. A potential way around this is to VPN the VPN, if the service allows it (most do not). An alternate method is to connect to Tor from within the VPN connection, if the service allows it. Secure connections, like https, should be encrypted, so passwords transmitted in that way would be ...



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