New answers tagged

1

Agree with what Drewbenn commented. It appears that your account was opened in a significantly different geographical location. Netflix recently made changes to what type of traffic they will permit to stream. Without knowing more about where you opened your account and where you now reside it's difficult to pin that down as the problem. See below: ...


-4

How paranoid are you and how much money do you have to spend? If you have money to spend then I would go to a local big box store and buy a cheap laptop off the shelf. Take it to a local library, unbox it there, wipe it clean, download a decent Linux security distro livecd and install it on the laptop. SecurityOnion isn't bad. One thing to look for is ...


1

You should check whether your current IP is on a proxy list. Since your IP address is assigned dynamically, it could be that the former owner got himself onto a proxy list - these lists get generically blocked by many pages. It is, however, easier, just to get a new IP and try again.


2

First, SSL stopped at version 3.0, which is massively flawed. TLS is currently at 1.2 (plus a lot of activity in the TLS 1.3 working group). This is generally a matter of acronym - hopefully when you say SSL encrypted, you actually mean TLS, and you specifically mean TLS 1.2 with AEAD ciphers. Second, for TLS of any type, both protocol version and cipher ...


1

Banks do not block all VPN, but they might block known VPN which are advertised for anonymous surfing or similar. Because if such a VPN is advertised and used to hide the origin of the user then chances are high that it will be used for illegal activities too. This means an increased risk for the bank and it's users if the bank accepts orders for money ...


0

I work for ExpressVPN. No, this is not malware. Here’s what’s happening: The ExpressVPN app for Windows is composed of two parts: the UI and the “engine”. The UI runs as a regular Windows app. The engine (xvpnd.exe) runs as a Windows service and is responsible for controlling the VPN. One benefit of this design is that the VPN is not affected if the app ...


4

If you are using OpenVPN for your organization it is probably better not to use any public certificates for OpenVPN but create your own CA and only accept certificates issued by this CA. This is actually the way proposed in the OpenVPN Howto. This way you are in full control of the certificates and even if some of the public CA's gets compromised and issues ...


2

Off the top of my head, you should be concerned about someone imitating the VPN server and then accepting the user's credentials, which they can replay. Does the VPN Client provide a warning that the cert cannot be verified? If so, then I suggest installing the cert on the machines as trusted, so that they do not get the warning. Then, teach the users ...


0

The technique is called two-factor authentication, referring to the three fundamental factors of authentication: Something you have, something you know and something you are. While each of these can be compromised individually, the methods are different. For example, if someone were able to find/guess you password (written down, leaked from another site, ...


0

It is a standard implementation. It does add an extra layer of security in the event of your primary password being compromised and the SecurID being removed from your possession (i.e stolen, or lost then found by a malicious third party), without the pin the token and/or account will be locked out after a few authentication attempts. I do agree however ...


1

A proxy is better for that. I think if you configure this proxy but skip the SSL cert configuration you should get your answer.


1

You need to hide your GPS info. My browser asked me permission to use GPS location services in my Macbook Pro when I was entering the whatismyipaddress URL that you are visiting, and I denied it. So the site is asking for that. So it believes I am in California, USA. Otherwise with GPS, the scripts/site would find out my true location. It could be also ...


0

The problem may be windows 8 (and windows 10) using 'Smart Multi-Homed Name Resolution'. This basically sends queries to multiple DNS servers and returns the fastest result, so your network adapter's DNS may not have been used. You can try using gpedit to disable this, avast have some instructions here If this setting does not appear in gpedit (I have seen ...


0

You mention four problems. All of them can be remediated by using Tor. Tor does not maintain your anonymity by hiding every detail. This is good because, for example, it is unclear how a browser could function with window size being hidden. Rather Tor has defaults that everyone using Tor should use. Once you do this, you become indistinguishable from all of ...


0

You are correct by saying that browsers send information that can be used to narrow down the possible source(s). There are quite a few points which need to be made here since this touches particular subjects. VPN service As long as the VPN server/service is not in your possession, nothing can guarantee your identity and/or security, which is often ...


0

The information about OS etc. comes from the HTTP User-Agent header. You can install some plugin to fake the User-Agent to any other you like, or strip it out altogether. The information about screen resolution comes from the Javascript layer and you can do nothing sensible about it. You could go and hack the browser binary, for example replacing ...


0

The VPN allows malware and attacks to tunnel right to your PC, you are basically putting your local computer on the same network as the remote computer you are surfing on. The VPN only protects your data from inspection while in-transit but does not protect you from the malicious data flowing through the pipe (which could be infected with malware from that ...


3

Assuming that the VPN service provides logs to law enforcement, then yes. Internet companies in the United States are required to adhere to U.S. data laws. That includes VPN services. That includes the providers used by private internet access. "Wait, what? But Mark Buffalo, Private Internet Access claims to not keep logs!" Yeah, that doesn't matter. PIA ...


1

There is probably SSL interception done by your company, i.e. man in the middle of SSL connections to analyze for malware and data leakage. Please contact the works system administrator for details on how to configure your system to include the necessary certificates. Apart from that make sure that you are even allowed to connect private PCs to the work ...


3

Assuming you are concerned about privacy and also assuming you are talking about client web traffic you may also want to consider other ways in which your location or identity may be leaking out. Some of which include: IPv6 traffic not forwarded through the VPN which may provide geolocation Cookies from primary website Third-party Cookies Cookie-like ...


0

Yes , i got one idea for detection criteria , Your monitoring system ( such as ELK ) can send an alert to the system admin to review the login whose is from such a location that is unexpected ( where you don't expect your employee to be )


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In order to setup a tunnel you have to : 1. discover your vpn provider and connect to him ( DNS) 2. Initiate a encryption with your provider ( SSL/TLS) 3. Once a pipe is added, routing entries must be added on your local computer so other services can find out about your tunnel (SSDP). 4. As for TCP, well it's TCP, if all would be encrypted then you ...



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