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1

I strongly disagree that devices or software with lots of published vulnerabilities are therefore less secure than those with few. And advocating that as means of determining quality is to endorse practice of keeping vulnerabilities secret. While this does not apply to end-user maintained systems: A large proportion of vulnerabilities can be mitigated with ...


2

Besides searching CERT, what other methods are available to help accomplish this task? Look for vendor specific patterns and penelize any vendors which have lots of vulnerabilities take a lot of time for fixes expire products too quickly, i.e. make them obsolete after only few years and stop supporting them make it hard for you to find the updates ...


1

The signature algorithm used in the root certificate is not used to establish trust against the root certificate because a root certificate is trusted by the virtue of a copy of the root certificate is installed in the browser, either included in the browser as part of the installation, or added later by the user to their certificate store. For the rest of ...


2

The answers already in provide some good technical advice on how to go about doing what you propose while minimizing risk to whatever machine you would be using to attempt the sanitization (ie. run a live distro of a different operating system type than was on your friend's infected computer, preferably after physically removing or disconnecting the normal ...


26

Referring to my answer to this question (before it was migrated): No, scanning the drive without "opening the folder" isn't a secure way to protect against viruses on the drive. It's very risky to insert what you believe to be a compromised USB device into your PC, no matter what AV you have installed. If you desperately need files from the drive (to quote ...


3

Depends on what it has on it. There are some attacks and malware which affects the signals that the device sends to the computer - most famously the BadUSB attacks, which let flash drives claim to be input devices - in which case merely plugging a device in could allow it to do things ranging from the annoying (hitting enter at random) to the malicious ...


6

It depends. I older times there was an autostart facility when inserting a data DVD/CD-ROM or USB stick but on modern systems this is usually no longer active by default. It might still be possible to corrupt the file system on a stick in a way which causes code execution when the system tries to access the device. And there are USB sticks with a writable ...


1

With the default Configuration OpenVAS will scan actively. It happend to me sometimes in the past that software crashed while scanning it with a vulnerablity scanner. In my expience this applies mostly to badly written PHP apps, IoT devices and cheap routers but of cause it can happen with other targets too.


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As of today (April 5th, 2016) The project was shut down due to lack of contribution, and there is no plan for it to return. As of today, a decision has been made to shut down the Open Sourced Vulnerability Database (OSVDB), and will not return. We are not looking for anyone to offer assistance at this point, and it will not be resurrected in its previous ...



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