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33

but the implication in the other question is that videos in question have been downloaded and played by media software on the target computer. No it is not. The implication is that there need to be a bug in the code handling the data. For instance the ffmpeg library is used in browsers like Chrome or Firefox and it had several serious bugs in the ...


11

A web browsers video system is just another video player, so the same problems apply which were mentioned in the linked question. The smaller set of supported video codecs greatly reduces the attack surface, but doesn't make bugs in the decoders for these formats inconceivable. The Adobe Flash plugin is renowned for its plethora of security bugs in the past ...


7

Freezing a browser is a "Denial of Service" attack to an extent. You are "denying" someone usage of a service, in this case an application. A vulnerability that leads to a Denial of Service. I have done this in the past as a proof of concept against "IE" with a divide by zero javascript. Most vendors that offer bug bounties offer them based on the ability ...


6

Yes, in the past there have been lots of exploits that only relied on malicious HTML and CSS code. You are right in that parsing a complex, turing-complete language is potentially more error-prone, giving an attacker more tools to craft an exploit. Yet, there are many different ways in which the implementation of the used CSS parser or other modules ...


3

Yes, it can be a security vulnerability. To exploit it, consider the following scenario. The attacker somehow convinces the user to visit a website under attackers control. A DLL is automatically downloaded to the Downloads folder. The user downloads a legit installer/setup/whatever to the Downloads folder. It is possible that this software is vulnerable ...


3

I'm afraid wiping the machine, changing all your passwords from another good machine, doing a fresh install from known good install media, and restoring the data (carefully) from backups really is the only solution guaranteed to clean your machine. In the trade we call this "nuke it from orbit", and the reason it is the only way to be sure is that you ...


2

If you can make profit from such issues depends on the rules of the relevant bug bounty program so this question can not be answered in general. And if it is considered a security vulnerability depends a lot on how the issue can be used in an attack. Making some browser freeze might just be an annoyance but making a industrial control system freeze is a ...


2

It is probably that Firefox and Chrome decided to trust certificates on different levels. Chrome trusts "GlobalSign Root CA" and it chains certificate all the way up to root one to check its validity, but FireFox trusts "Trusted Root CA SHA256 G2" and there is no need for it to check all up to root one to tell you if that browser trust it. So if both ...


2

I'm not sure how well defined app is in this case. Depending on which browser you are using, it is a collection of one or more processes. Browser plugins and extensions may or may not be running in their own processes. If you assume that a supercookie isn't utilizing an unpublished browser vulnerability, then only the browser process, and processes that it ...


2

Yes - beneficial, although it doesn't fix everything. Being hacked through your browser is one of the most common ways you'll be hit. If the browser is running as a user that doesn't have access to your private files, your web cam and such, then the impact of a hack is much less. There are still risks. If the hacker uses a local privilege escalation ...


2

There are Yara rules submitted by SANS ISC to detect BeEF, and these could be repurposed by yarashop for the network layer as a early-warning detection system. The author shows how to utilize Volatility to read into a memory capture and look for BeEF-related signatures and communications -- ...


1

Similar to XKCD Authorization, however replace "stealing the laptop when logged in" with "executing processes in the context of my user". So, yes, they might not be able to get at your user account itself in your case, so local files would be protected, but they could get access to all your active sessions within your browser. Add in a priv escalation ...


1

Hi I am a working student at Sirrix AG and responsible for the QA of BitBox. You are actually surfing more secure, considering that if you infect BitBox with malware from the web, your host system will not be effected. The Microphone is also disabled by default, so it cannot be activated by malware to spy on you. Also all interactions between Host and ...


1

GlobalSign has three active root CAs of which two have a CommonName of simply GlobalSign, although other name components are different if you look at the details. Root-R1: CN = GlobalSign Root CA, OU = Root CA, O = GlobalSign nv-sa, C = BE valid 1998/09/01 to 2028/01/28 sha1 fingerprint b1 bc 96 8b d4 f4 9d 62 2a a8 9a 81 f2 15 01 52 a4 1d 82 9c Root-R2: ...


1

I believe the issue is related to the ads. The Pirate Bay has not only been using deceptive ads but it appears they allow their usage as this is a very well known ongoing practice by them. As you can see below you have a typical torrent page on PB. Which is the correct download link? If you guessed the big download button you guessed wrong. That is malware ...


1

IMO, you should trust the warning. Some sites tend to have generally weaker security and/or use ad networks that are shady. When a vulnerability is found by Google, they block the site. The site owners generally respond to this problem by correcting the security problem. They'll then notify Google (or Google will notice on its own), and, assuming the ...


1

“Attackers on thepiratebay.se may trick you into doing something dangerous like installing software or revealing your personal information (for example, passwords, phone numbers, or credit cards).” well that should answer your question. These types of warnings typically occur when an ad network is compromised and starts serving malicious ads. Because sites ...


1

Panopticlick is looking for things that make you different to other visitors. In this case, fewer people use canvas blockers than don't, so you become more unique if you use one. However, this only means that it is easier to tell you apart from another user - not that they can tell who you are. Think of it being like a security camera which can only see ...


1

I had this same issue about 2-3 weeks ago, with the same site coming up after running several scans with Roguekiller. Prior to that the browsers would lock up or work very intermittently, (Firefox, Chrome, Edge, IE , Opera, ect.) Using a web browser in a game, running a VM or Tor worked, but even Tor would lock up after an hour. This was on Win 10 64bit, ...


1

This could give rise to an information leakage vulnerability. Say your whole site is served over HTTPS, without DNS prefetching disabled. There may be certain pages on your site that reference other external resources. For example, imagine a banking website that customers can login to, and that the page for managing mortgages has some external links unique ...


1

I' not sure if this can be really called a vulnerability ... However, this behaviour could be possilby be unwanted. I would imagine a possible exploit like this: User is on a website Make the user click on a button on the left bottom on the screen (fix the position of the button so that it never changes its position on the screen) As soon as the user has ...



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