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0

XSS attacks are based upon the fact that input becomes output to the end-user's browser. The most common attack is basically a PHP site containing <?php echo $_GET["message"]; ?> You would then pass this URL a parameter containing the javascript code. If you want to set this up, create a something.php file on your web server, input the above code ...


0

When you visit a web page, it hosts malware somewhere on the page. Your browser downloads the content and processes it, exploits some code in your browser, giving it access to your computer. It installs a mail server and starts sending spam - thousands of messages every few minutes. Didn't you notice your system has slowed down, and/or your hard drive is ...


2

Shortest answer, read the Firefox changelog for a release and witness why. You can find it @ https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/releases/ For all the specific releases. Just click on one of the release numbers.


1

I'd be tempted to put a proxy between the server and the client and compare the output of the request byte for byte. That should rule out server differences due to browser headers in the request etc. and will narrow it down to local differences. You could then also capture the output in the proxy and load it into each of the browsers on each machine (as a ...


2

There are two main reasons for creating a new version of a program: (in this case a browser) To add new features (eg. viewing a video in the browser). To fix a problem, which may be: A minor issue (such as cmd-L not opening a new window when no window is available) A big issue (eg. a malicious web page can read data from other requests [1] ) Some ...


18

I'm really just repeating other answers but let's try to explain it using a metaphor. A computer program is a long description of how the computer must behave, based on what information it is given. A browser program is given some instructions by a Web server program and draws a Web page for you to use. It then tells the Web server which next page it would ...


0

It's because of a category of vulnerabilities known as client-side vulnerabilities. Over the period of time, servers have got more secure, so cyber crooks, instead of focussing on servers these days, focus on client-side security bugs. When it comes to browsers, these bugs are mostly used after free bugs (specially in Internet Explorer which has changed ...


3

Here is a link to Firefox's security update notes: Security Advisories You can see by the number of fixes, and especially those marked "critical," that by not updating you would invite significant risk.


56

Because there are security vulnerabilities found in software all the time. These vulnerabilities are sometimes publicly disclosed, sometimes not. Either way, as developers find or find out about them they patch them. Running old versions of browsers leaves you vulnerable to malicious websites trying to infect your computer. Below are links to web pages ...


1

All software has bugs. Updates help to resolve those bugs. When it comes to browsers, bugs can mean that malware can infect your browser, or even your machine. Worst case? An attacker can learn your banking details and empty your account.


3

Well the whole point of updating/patching anything is to fix known vulnerabilities. Any bugs/vulnerabilities found in the version of firefox you're running could be exploitable. Updating your browser will modify how the browser works and result in those vulnerabilities being no longer exploitable. It's really as simple as that. Updating can also introduce ...


0

Another problem is, that most modern websites requests resources from other hosts (JS libraries from a CND or even from a server controlled by the website owner) and the URI contains the DNS name in the most cases. You would have to know the IP addresses and proper HOST header of all the resources the desired website needs and stop your browser to resolve ...


0

If you use CORS for anything else then XMLHTTPRequest (which historically defaulted to only allow same origin) it has to be supported on the client side (browser) and it also has to explicitly used on the server side. By default cross origin requests can be done simply be including an image, stylesheet, script etc from another site and if you have a ...


0

... and can I do anything to hide this? Yes, the advice is the same as for all "hostile" environments: don't use their computer, and don't use their network. ..Or at least don't use their network without a VPN to a trusted network, but best to just not use it at all. And certainly, certainly, don't use their computer.


1

If you use http to access stackexchange, the university can access which account you are logged in with, as there is a link to your own account in the top bar. Note that it is a theoretical "can". If you use https and there is no university certificate or compromising software on the device you use, the university can't know that without using some very ...


0

That's not the way it happened. There are cases of ad networks presenting malware, but generally the ad network has been fooled. The hacker generally creates a innocent site, and buys ads from a network (Bing can be one). So, as soon as he gets traffic coming from Bing, he changes the site to install malware. So, Bing was not compromised, but the site was ...


0

Depending on where this proxy device would hypothetically reside on your local network, it could cause unintended local congestion, interfaces errors, etc. The cloud solution would keep all this off your network.


1

Pros: Possibly reduced cost. You won't be maintaining your own infrastructure. Cloud solutions typically allow you to force company assets (like laptops for example) to be routed through the cloud proxy for URL filtering even when off network. (increased security) Cons: Could increase latency. This may or may not be applicable based on your ...


1

The BREACH attack is a Side-Channel attack. You need some way to access the side channel. On page 13 of the presentation, you can see what BREACH needs the attacker to set up: A web server serving the site the browser visits. A callback where the javascript on the victim's browser notifies the attacker that the request completed, giving time information ...


2

First off, the service you are talking about is Opera Turbo, which the web browser, Opera Mini, makes use of. I would imagine that network admins at a school do not care the least about what gross/weird sites you look at in your free time as long as you are not using a ton of bandwidth or breaking the law. I know that isn't your question, but it is still ...


0

A drive-by-download can refer to several things. A download that happens with the user's consent, but they didn't really understand that the consequences. A download that happens without the user's consent or knowledge The first method is not very "drive-by" in my opinion, but it is still useful to recognize that this is still possible. Tricking ...


2

Although the same-origin policy may stop an attacker from accessing the legitimate iFrame content, the problem is that the user has no way to verify that they're actually interacting with the legitimate iFrame (short of going to the source which most users won't do). An attacker could just as easily replace the iFrame source with a phishing page and gain the ...


0

Detecting Phishing and Malware sites by browsers like Chrome and IE is based on lookups made into databases. These databases are held by the browser owners and DNS servers. If you consider the example of Google safe browsing that works with every browser : http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/safebrowsing/?hl=en This service scans the web and builds ...


3

Anonymous navigation is a confusing term. The navigation is not anonymous, it only leaves less traces on the computer. Even if you disable that funcionality, the user could instruct the browser to wipe all data, and get the same. Or s/he could make the AppData folder for Chrome read-only, and get the same effect. There's better ways to do that. The easier ...


3

You can do this with a GPO. Go to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Google > Google Chrome. Look for a folder named Allowed extensions. There configure a blacklist of *. This will prevent users from installing plugins.


0

There is the sand cat projet which provide a lot of pen testing tools, like scripting in lua, better view over the console and dynamic injection tools, and a lot of other good surprise.


3

When something like Burp finds an XSS vulnerability, I can't ever verify it when using something like TamperData. If you are already using Burp to find the vulnerability, why not use the intercepting proxy functionality to modify the request and to inject the XSS payload?


5

Your best bet would be mantra from OWASP: http://www.getmantra.com/ Contains a myriad of tools for penetration testing out of the box. Also open source should you need to add/modify anything.


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Most browsers allow you to disable the function. For instance with chrome you need to start the browser using C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe" --args --disable-web-security For Firefox you have to go type about:config in the address bar. Then you need to set the browser.urlbar.filter.javascript to False. For Internet Explorer ...


5

I did visit the page (from a safe place!) and it's triggering the beforeunload event to change the URL, like this: var exit=true; var temp_url = document.location.href; var url_pieces = new Array(); url_pieces = temp_url.split("/"); var goto_url = 'http://www.imagesnake.com/ad.html' ; window.onbeforeunload = function () { if(exit==true){ ...


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The question is asked mostly to protect you from phishing attacks. The website may fake an Operating system, and ask you to enter sensitive information like passwords. To quote the spec: User agents should ensure, e.g. by means of an overlay, that the end user is aware something is displayed fullscreen. User agents should provide a means of exiting ...



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