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4

Alice will see a warning. This is because the certificate is checked at the point where the SSL negotiation happens, which is before you get the contents of the page - whether those contents are an HTML page or a status code with a redirect. For an example of why this is important, imagine this scenario: Evul manages (e.g. by DNS cache poisoning or some ...


1

This is a pretty scary thing to be doing, as by definition, you are wanting to look at sensitive, user-submitted data on those computers. Sure, you might catch the occasional wrongdoer, but you're going to be capturing quite a lot of normal people's passwords, emails, etc. Which is probably opening a whole slew of liability to whoever owns the computer lab. ...


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If you want to do that install Firefox. Firefox comes with its own trusted CA store and what you add there will only be available to Firefox.


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The whole goal of HTTPS is to prevent eavesdropping so that anyone monitoring your web traffic can't see what you're sending. As useful as it is, HTTPS presents a bit of a problem to antivirus software because when you visit sites over an encrypted connection, your antivirus software cannot see what sites you're visiting or what files you're downloading, at ...


1

Google's Diagnostic page says: http://safebrowsing.clients.google.com/safebrowsing/diagnostic?site=http%3A%2F%2Fgoo.gl Part of this site was listed for suspicious activity 1 time(s) over the past 90 days. URL-Shorteners are often used to obfuscate malicious links. Google's own link shortener is no exception. Maybe the safebrowsing blacklist ...


1

In spite of being possible to read/write data to SSL/TLS channels as with vanilla TCP/IP sockets, in Java or C or whatever, SSL provides you the concept of SSL session, which can be kept across several TCP/IP connections. Thus, IMHO this makes SSL a session layer protocol (I wonder why someone came up with the TLS name...).


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You've already listed some resources so I will add another that is not a tool per-se, but a write up on how the different browsers are storing data. The write up contains a minimal python script that should help get you started. As for Safari, pre version 6.0 the credentials were only base64 encoded so it was easier to get data then. The difference with ...


4

Guess My educated guess from reading the spec: The browser will never see more than one server-certificate. Rather the cipher spec is negotiated in advance. And ONLY THEN does the server send the certificates. So if negotiation winds up with an an RSA-cert authenticated cipher suite, then the RSA cert chain will be sent. And if the negotiation winds up with ...


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When the default DNS server of your internet provider doesn't give you the results you expect, you could set a different one in your operating systems network settings. Here is a list of IP addresses of public DNS servers. When you need help with setting a DNS server in your operating system, consult the appropriate stackexchange.


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It turns out that the DNS system has been hijacked by yandex in cooperation with turk telekom (TTNET) which in turn results in non resolving pages end up on the yandex landing page.


7

There are three main areas of difference. First, password management is a feature for browser developers, while it is the entire product for the third parties. So typically, the browser managers only offer basic core features. The 3rd parties add lots of useful stuff on top to differentiate their product. For example: Storing other information apart from ...


1

On Windows, your Chrome saved passwords are encrypted using DPAPI. This mechanism ultimately derives a key from your Windows account password to keep the data secure, and so once you've logged in, the data can be decrypted by applications that rely on this store. So, Chrome doesn't have access to your Windows account password at all. It relies on the ...


0

What does that really mean? Can you please give me a real life example? Simple attack example On page at evil.com the attacker has put (jQuery because lazy): $.post("http://bank.com/transfer", { to: "ciro", ammount: "100" }) The attacker then convinces you to visit evil.com (YOU'VE GAINED A PRIZE!) This would work because authentication cookies ...


2

This really depends on the sites you're logged in to and how alert you are as a person. I can imagine the following scenarios (not specific to any of the sites you mentioned, but just general scenarios): Sensitive information is transmitted in the URL: For each request, a session ID is transmitted in the URL. In this case proxy servers will log the ...


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This is called a 403 phishing attack, and the only way you can prevent it is to prevent user-generated-content from containing links to external resources that are rendered on your pages, like images. Fortunately, it's not a particularly common attack, but it can be concerning, particularly if the credentials users use on your site are more likely than ...


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In Firefox you may manually edit prefs.js file adding: user_pref("capability.policy.policynames", "localfilelinks"); user_pref("capability.policy.localfilelinks.sites", "http://localhost:8080"); user_pref("capability.policy.localfilelinks.checkloaduri.enabled", "allAccess"); Notice the need for explicit port specification if different from 80.


4

Google is not hosting ChromeSetup.bat. A requirement for this attack is that a website needs to have an endpoint with a less common Content-Type and preferably a misconfigured Content-Disposition header (namely: no 'filename' attribute). These two headers will cause the browser to download the response as a file, instead of rendering it. In the URL you ...



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