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11

Unless you have an expert in computer forensics it's gonna be very difficult to know what happened, what files were modified, and what kinds of backdoors were installed. Since your web server is "huge" I assume you're following a good backup policy, right? Right? Once you have a breach, assume the server is compromised and restore to the most recent good ...


7

They can't snoop your traffic unless they are in a position of adjacency to any system in the routing chain. When a client first connects to a server, the packet will go from their computer to their router, which then passes it on to the ISP's local routing server, which then passes it down a backbone (via a set of other large routers) and eventually to the ...


5

You could compare the Last-Modified HTTP headers for some static resources (e.g images, css), from each IP, and see whether they are different. If they are different I would assume the IPs are separate hosts. You could also make a request to both IPs at the exact same moment and compare the Date HTTP header in the responses - if they are different then the ...


4

The problem is with the browser (or in the case of the linked CVE with Outlook). The attack is as follows: I create a file and send this file to the program with the MIME type image/png. The browser ignores the MIME type and sniffs the content of the file (even I explicitly say that the file is of type image/png). The browser determines (from sniffing) ...


4

Reliably detecting Cross-Site Scripting is a relatively complex task, just inserting a string with no control characters and looking for it in the response, is a very bad idea as you'll be swamped by false positives. What most scanners to is take a series of standard vectors (e.g. ">< script >alert(1)< /script ><") and then look at the response ...


4

In terms of scanning the system for compliance, it's a question of running vulnerability scans and see if they pass externally and if the risk is acceptable internally. In terms of whether the system is configured in a compliant manner takes more work as per the following list: Is networking limited to protocols required for business purposes with no ...


2

I'm not sure what a self-test is, however you don't need to pay anything for tools in order to test against the PCI standards. There are loads of free tools out there, there are even security and forensics specific OS distros out there that cost absolutely nothing. So get a copy of the Backtrack or Kali OS distro and run it off a USB or as a virtual machine ...


2

No. The number of pages Google (and any major search bot) is willing to crawl on your domain (or indeed whether they are willing to crawl it at all) is based on how relevant they think your domain is. There are plenty of sites with an infinite number of pages. This problem was solved decades ago.


1

Even without special engineering, certain site architectures can have long recursive paths - certain wikis, for instance. Any decently written bot should be able to cope with such site behaviour, at the very least having a recursion depth limit. I don't think anyone here is going to be able to answer concretely, since none of us have access to google's ...


1

Yes, a server could be present on many network, sub-networks, backbones and so. If you reach a single host through two different routes, you will find the same server with two different ip. If this server hold some certificats, they have to match a DNS name. So you could find some of them under https, smtps, imaps, and so on... You could use openssl tool ...


1

Why would you be testing CPanel for PCI compliance? How did you come to arrive at C-VT as the applicable SAQ? Which PCI requirement is this being done to meet? One thing is for sure: CPanel should NEVER be exposed to the open Internet. So if you are scanning it from over the net you can forget PCI compliance. I do PCI for a living.



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