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4

First, may I ask why you think the app is not as secure as the website? Generally speaking, from a security perspective, one of the worse things you can possibly do is to involve PHP, which has more security pitfalls then, well, probably all of the other common technologies combined. Additionally: if you're any sensitive traffic from the app to the ...


3

As long as you don't setup the server yourself you cannot be sure that what you are seeing with ssh is actually what is happening on the server. At the end your ssh access could just be a well built honeypot and nothing you see there relates to real server activity. Even if you've setup the server yourself you cannot be sure, because there is still the ...


3

Without a defense in depth security strategy, once the perimeter defense of your network has been penetrated through your compromised server there are a few threats to the rest of your network. The vulnerability exploited by the attacker could be available on other machines on your network, allowing an attacker to move to another machine with ease. A poor ...


2

Ideally the application would be written to conform to a 3 tier architecture. In this scenario it is common for the Presentation Layer to reside in a WebDMZ, the Application Layer to reside in an AppDMZ and the Data Layer to reside on the internal network. If this isn't feasible for some reason or another, I recommend the database reside in a ...


2

For a reasonable level of security, the answer is really neither. The database should be housed in it's own zone, not the DMZ with the web server, or in the internal network zone. This allows additional levels of protection both against intrusion from the public Internet should the web server or web application be compromised, and against attacks from the ...


2

Let's try to tackle two problems at once. First of all yes you will take a performance hit, especially if you are logging onto the same machine. The idea is that you do not log everything locally but instead use an encrypted syslog connection (or similar) to log every request to a seperate logging server. This will relieve the webserver from being busy with ...


2

I will answer the question in a generic way, as well as the question was asked. If is the railway local web site that is being attacked and not you, you can not do anything to avoid this. No matter the speed of your internet or if you are using a VPN. To be clear, I am not considering a lot of factors here, because the question does not permits me.


1

The biggest challenge in developing secure (web) applications is implementing a secure (or security) development lifecycle process that is both effective and measurable. Enumerating all of the facets of such an undertaking is not possible here; but suffice it to say there are hundreds of books and white papers written to address the subject.


1

You need to do a risk assessment for each site. and consider likelihood as well as consequences. It could be that some of your sites have a much higher likelihood than others. If this is the case, you could consider slightly modified approaches, such as keeping the high risk sites on their own system and only putting the lower risk ones on the shared system. ...


1

Iptables can do this without any difficulty. Create a chain for the target IP address(es) and within that chain, modify the inbound request packet so that the request is for a different file. Alternatively, you could modify the outgoing packets so that they contain the target file instead of the original contents of index.html. None of the binaries or ...



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