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5

It probably wouldn't work. If you told the Tor exit relay, "I want to go to 127.0.0.1" (that's the IP of localhost), it would try to connect to itself, because that's what that IP means. Unless the exit relay had a web server running, the connection would fail. I wouldn't be surprised if the Tor software checks for loopback IPs and rejects the connection. ...


3

There are several methods you can investigate in order to answer your questions. Find the versions for SSHD and RPCbind and NGinx. Google each version for any remote or local exploits and vulnerabilities. The attacker could very well have used a blend of local and remote exploits or vulnerabilities, and not a single way to get in. Look through all the ...


2

First of all, I should note that I disagree with the premise about being vulnerable just for being on a shared host. If your shared-hosting account is compromised by another user, that's because either: The hosting company didn't properly isolate the users The user did something silly (like having 777 files) With a VPS, the isolation is provided by a ...


1

In general, I agree with your implication that if you only have a single web application there is little security benefit to moving the DB onto a separate server. That being said, there could be some contrived scenarios where there might be a security benefit. For example, if the web application does not have full admin rights to the DB, then a compromised ...


1

Those credentials have to be placed somewhere. If you decide to place them at a place like /usr/lib/cgi-bin, you'd have to grant your web user access to that directory structure which would in turn make your system more vulnerable. It is more common to place them one level above the web root as a compromise between the two. This way you don't open much of ...


1

Is it a good idea to preventively disable (public) access to certain filetypes (by extension) and/or by filenames? Absolutely! In fact all access should be denied and only allow known good requests. This is otherwise known as "Default Deny" or "Whitelisting". Marcus Ranum has some great points in The Six Dumbest Ideas in Computer Security. Though closely ...


1

Assuming you're using a decent language & framework, the only URLs that are accessible are the routes you defined. Everything else should get 404'd by default, except perhaps static non-sensitive files in a specific directory. Anything sensitive should be out of reach of the web server anyway and should only be proxied by the application should it ...



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