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25

You can't simply Force a client, but to trick him! As long as the device's WiFi is running, it keeps sending probe requests, searching for your previous connected networks. Using some software like airodump-ng, you can easily sniff out those probes. Then the attacker may create a similar evil twin using the BSSID and ESSID gathered from the previous ...


11

What you are referring to is called a captive portal. It allows WiFi providers to authorise users, get confirmation for service agreement from them, display ads, require payment for extended usage time, etc. Its existence doesn't have security implications in itself (unless it was poorly implemented and leaking user-provided information, but that is on a ...


7

There are a few methods that could have been used: Devices of all sorts that use WiFi connection usually have a setting that lets the device connect automatically when the same SSID is out there. This is usually set by default and users do not usually turn it off. Hak5 generated a list of many many public WiFi SSID's (Ex: "MacDonald's free wifi") that the ...


4

It is as strong as the SSL configuration of your tunnel between your laptop, and the VPN gateway. All traffic now goes through the tunnel to the VPN gateway where it reaches out to the Internet. The VPN gateway will then ferry the response back to you.


3

If the device is enrolled on your company's network (using a device enrollment / Mobile Device Management process), they could have a lot of visibility. iOS allows for a "always-on VPN" (link). This allows for either certain or all applications to use a particular VPN connection; which could be your place of employment. With the implementation of enforced ...


3

As a client your basic countermeasure is to use a VPN. Since you don't have a good way to baseline anything about the multitude of Wifi access points you might have to use, your ability to spot a real one vs a Wifi Pineapple is pretty minimal. Your only hope, really, is to immediately route all traffic through a properly authenticated VPN which will resist ...


2

"How Secure?" is a difficult question to answer. It depends on your particular circumstance and risk tolerance. If you are using WPA2 for encryption with a complex key, than I think it's reasonable to say that your connection is at least as secure as a wired Ethernet connection.


2

According to the 802.11i-2004 specification (link to download 802.11i-2004 pdf): A pass-phrase is a sequence of between 8 and 63 ASCII-encoded characters. The limit of 63 comes from the desire to distinguish between a pass-phrase and a PSK displayed as 64 hexadecimal characters.


2

Well, WiFi internet security is one of the major issues that the users are always complaining so I am going to share some quick tips to make your internet connection secure. In the first step you need to open your router setting page you can only do that by typing “192.168.1.1” in your browser page and then enter your user name and password which can be ...


2

If the concern is just as far as the WiFi hotspot and the users who are connected to it, then as long as you are connected to the VPN, the traffic should be encrypted and cannot be viewed by any other WiFi user. There are some concerns however, on the type of VPN used, which encryption method it is using, and so on. Also, I think the biggest concern would ...


2

You can be anywhere you like. Once you have the handshake you can crack the password anywhere you like. The handshake is as if you have a "hashed" password and you want to crack it. One method of doing this is using aircrack-ng which tries to crack the handshake using a dictionary attack (This is a passive attack on your captured packets). You can view the ...


2

There is not so much you can do with securing wireless network from a router standpoint, but key points to hardening are:- Change default password. If available use WPA, not WEP. Disable remote administration Change the default SSID name Enable router firewall Disable SSID broadcast Enable wireless MAC filter


1

The question is whether the ISP's device and the Linksys can pair together in order to provide a single WiFi node (with the same settings and password). If they can do this then you simply need to perform the typical hardening of a device that you normally would (no external access to the admin page, change the default password, etc.)


1

Although the captive portal doesn't technically allow anything that an attacker cannot already do with a fake hotspot, it may lure users into a false sense of security. As users expect such a portal, a fake portal can be set up in addition to the fake hotspot. It's likely that users put more trust in such a connection then in just the hotspot itself (their ...


1

Nothing can be 100% secure these days. There was a case back in 2011 where a WiFi neighbor Barry Ardolf, 46, repeatedly hacked into his next-door neighbors’ Wi-Fi network to frame them for child pornography and other horrendous misconduct. Last year in Japan, a Wi-Fi router was attacked. Generally WPA2 is considered more secure than its predecessor WEP but ...


1

It means the access point is a hidden station which means it does not send any beacons. Airodump knows of the network existence and it's SSID because the clients did revealed it. This is why a hidden station isn't a secure one. As soon as a client is connected at least the BISSD is visible to everyone with a card in monitor mode.


1

Keep these things in mind: How does it wirelessly connect to the internet ? WEP should be fine if you are only concerned about remote hackers, but still is considered generally insecure. Think about this: If the camera's wifi security is outdated (WPA and WPA2 have been around for a long time), what else will be insecure? What kind of authentication does ...



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