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4

That is because listening for a beacon and not getting it just might mean that the network has a private ("hidden") SSID. From this article (emphasis mine): The 802.11 standard allows APs to beacon with the SSID field set to null - this is referred to as a hidden SSID. A client that wishes to associate with an AP using a hidden SSID must first send ...


4

How is eduroam different from a VPN in terms of security? Eduroam is only an infrastructure for authentication, it allows your institution's servers to prove that you're indeed the one you're pretending to be. It only authenticates you, but doesn't tunnel your traffic or similar - your traffic is still at the mercy of whatever network you're ...


2

What you're seeing is the intended behavior. Clients won't be able to connect to your rogue AP as your AP isn't set up with the same PSK the real AP is, and clients shouldn't connect to a network that has the same name (SSID) but different security (unencrypted). To answer your question, no it is not possible. Even if you manage to set up such an AP (pretty ...


2

If we assume that your procedure is correct then the only purpose of "No Handshake" situation is caused by hardware limitation, i.e.: When your wifi device is 802.11g will not capture the handshake packets which are sent between two 802.11n router and client. Everything will seem to be normal, you can see the frames and Beacons, also you are able to ...


2

What if I want to communicate completely anonymously? Wireless is relatively anonymous from the perspective that you, as a person, won't be easily identified unless your traffic gives you away. That said, your location is identifiable using triangulation and your hardware device ID (MAC) will identify the device used unless you're able to override it. ...


2

Subquestions 1 and 2 are already answered, so I take the other two: How do I know that my credentials are encrypted between my device, the access point I'm connected to, and the authentication servers? Make sure that you use an encrypted WLAN connection (otherwise your credentials can be sniffed from the air) and secure protocols like https. Then ...


1

For a nice visual demonstration you can use the graphical interface of Ettercap (ettercap -G) in combination with Wireshark or mitmproxy to run several types of MiTM attacks. There are several plugins for Ettercap which could help you with the demonstration. I'm trying to demonstrate to a business owner why he needs to secure his network, but he says ...


1

What I want to ask is even on a secured wifi (which requires some kind of password for authentication), the data still travels from a device to the router; can't that data be sniffed using tools? Yes, if you sniff in monitor mode, but the data will, as noted, be encrypted. let's say I were an authenticated user of such a secured connection and then ...


1

The school network administrator could limit the access to Internet through the following ways (depending on the network devices): MAC Address filter (White/Black list) - Not very efficient though since a MAC address can be easily spoofed. Scheduled time - Only within a certain time frame the connection to the Internet is allowed URL Blocking (White/Black ...


1

in psk authentication and 802.1x authentication methods, five main keys are generated. master session key,group master key,paired master key,paired transient key and group temporal key.paired transient key and group temporal key are generated after four way handshake. when you switch from one access point to another,the four way handshake starts again.


1

If everything with the VPN is working correctly, nobody can see what you are browsing. The most that they can tell is that you've created a VPN connection to your VPN provider.


1

I suppose another approach is "punt on public AP whenever possible, and tether to a VPN connection over your phone instead". Chews up data though. You have basically two strategies for your risk (surfing on a public AP). Elimination: Not using it Mitigation: Taking precautions to reduce the probability and impact of having information disclosed. ...


1

MS Wi-Fi Sense is simply going to share your pre-shared key for your Wireless network with the contacts that you have stored (Outlook, Facebook, and Bing I think?) so that your (presumed) friend can use your network without having to manually tell them the pre-shared key. Now - the reason Microsoft states that your guest won't be able to access other ...


1

Most of the remotely accessible power strips I've been looking at for a current project have either http or telnet access (no encryption on either) for control so any time you access it, you're sending credentials in the clear. They are in the IOT minimum security zone, anyone on the local segment can packet-sniff your credentials if they're determined to ...



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