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6

A MAC address more-or-less* uniquely identifies a network card, and is only accessible to other devices on the local (non-routed) network. So yes, the Starbucks network can and does know your MAC address, and certainly could be sending it up into their database somewhere. Concern #1: That doesn't mean they're "recording traffic" (although, of course, they ...


5

If I understand correctly, your connection to the Internet gateway is wired and everyone else is WiFi. If that is the case, the WiFi users cannot capture your FTP credentials because there is no need for the WiFi AP to transmit them, and it won't. But really, the answer is to convince the people at the other end to replace FTP with SFTP.


2

L2 is also vulnerable if everyone can access your home server using public IP (if you have one). As long as you set up a home server only using private IP (NAT), it will be accessible only to people who connected to your network, but including people who use your wi-fi since they are in a same router. If it's your only option, just make sure that your wi-fi ...


1

I think what you are looking for is 'parental controls' on your modem/router. Check your router if such a facility is available. If its not, then a browser that has such controls. The cheaper versions will just give you an option to enter the names of the websites that you want to block. The pricier ones will have advanced software (like privoxy as mentioned ...


1

I guess that most corporate people setting up Internet access for the employees may have the same need: how to ensure that employee does not waste enterprise's bandwith to download torrents? Usually, the main answer lies in two things: Restrict the destination port numbers to the really needed ones, Setup a DNS cache server, which can provide an easy way ...


1

If L1 becomes compromised then the attacker is inside your network, and yes any other device connected to the same network (be it via WiFi, Wired, whatever) is vulnerable to some sort of attack. What that attack may be is then dependent on what ports are open on L2, and what software versions it's using. But in general it's safe to assume that if L1 is ...



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