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5

Pixie works by exploiting weaknesses in the generation of the E-S1 and E-S2 nonces which are used to produce the enrollee hash, as described in the Pixie Dust Attack. Traditional attacks attack the two halves of the WPS PIN (PSK1, PSK2) in an online attack, essentially brute-forcing all possible options for the PIN until it is found. This has to be done ...


5

It is possible in theory, but this does not make it having actually happened. It is equally possible that whoever said that did it just to mess with your son's head, and yours. We'd need to know what the exact make and model (if possible even firmware revision) your router is. The WiFi router is essentially a small PC and it is sometimes (depending on the ...


4

The problem here is that most people who buy baby monitors plan on using them in their home, and most people don't do top secret stuff in their home - they reserve that for their corporate office or government agency type stuff. I also wouldn't recommend wireless security cameras either because they're seen as a low cost alternative to wired, mostly used in ...


4

The most common things are default configuration and outdated software. So, in order to be safe, first be sure that you are using the latest software provided by the vendor. Then change the default configuration. This include users and passwords, ports and any other relevant option you see. Finally, be smart. Don't allow external traffic to that device if ...


4

You had no right to scan their network, and any decision now is up to them. They could try and sue you (I doubt that), simply scold you or even thank you, and it very much depends on how you told them. I brought it up to the staff as soon as I found it and showed them, that they had two company computers unsecured on the public wifi they offered. I do ...


3

Some very specific suggestions: A device that is not accessible via the internet is going to limit the physical range of threats. Wired, RF, or even bluetooth based devices will likely fall into this category. If you do use a WiFi based monitor, make sure your home wireless network is secured at a basic best practice level, and that the monitor supports ...


3

Snapchat used to use a famously weak crypto implementation with a global key stored in the source code to encrypt pictures at rest, so they are infamous when it comes to security. But, luckily enough, all communication is over HTTPS. That means the owner of the network (your company) can not MitM the users (your friend) and read the content of their ...


3

Who can view what you are doing? You, anyone that uses the same router (assuming you're not in Access Point isolation mode), anyone that has access to the router's access logs, possibly including the person that set up the router, and the Internet Service Provider. WPA prevents other people without access to the router from viewing your data casually from ...


3

This kind of depends on how strong you want your network security policy to be. Lets point out the main good and bad things about a WiFi network: Good: Convenient for the office workers to work from anywhere in the office No need for cables and switches (This saves money and time) Keep better track of your users and have more control straight from the ...


2

Rass, yes I remembered 4 years ago my network guy reported the very same problem. The accounts department went and bought a Brother wireless printer & connected it via wifi. turns out it's MAC points to a Japanese NIC maker of Brother & Toshiba printers. Man check your bomboclate print fleet first.


2

If it is your personal WiFi (Verizon jetpack) and you are running WPA2 from your tablet to your Jetpack ... while it is possible for them to run a WiFi sniffer and/or a MitM proxy ... it is very unlikely. Like coffeethulhu said SSL/TLS can be can be intercepted and decrypted IF your company controls the network access you are using for your chat (its ...


2

Contrary to a common misconception, the network key is not the encryption key. The WiFi communication is encrypted on its own using a key exchange protocol. This makes it impossible for anyone without abnormally huge processing power to decrypt anything that goes through. That said, if the person controls the router, that changes things as the router ...


2

You do not need to be concerned by this. Windows 8 in particular introduced many new security features and technologies which take direct aim at early boot malware. You can read about these in some depth here: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn283963(v=ws.11).aspx One introduction for example is ELAM - Early Launch Anti-Malware, which gives ...


1

There are 2 main factors here: the person configured your wifi the person was using your computer Both of these factors open up opportunities for spying. If the person set up wifi using the lowest possible security (WEP), it is possible that they (or others) would be able to monitor all your traffic. But if the person intended to do harm, they would ...


1

Yes, this could happen in theory. The webinterface could be faked by the attacker if she manages to get full control over the router (e.g. rewrite firmware), so that your normal DNS server is displayed on the settings page, while in fact a malicious one is actually used. In theory the attacker could also fake the firmware update function, so that you think ...


1

The question should be along the lines of Is my computer more vulnerable if I leave wireless on while shutting down/booting. I would say it's "possible," but most likely you are completely fine, if we assume you are up to date with patches and all that good stuff. I've seen AV Programs that have an option if you want to wait to disable the firewall ...


1

In some cases it could be risky to have wireless on even for a second, particularly for those instances when you are connected to a public network.Most guys prefer their laptops to connect to wireless connections automatically which they have ever used, due to which they are in great danger of security breach.Talking about security over wireless networks its ...


1

One of the points of social media login is to avoid password entry by resuing your existing loggged-in state with the social media. If you have not already logged in to the social media site in your browser, simply do that over mobile connection and then connect to this wifi. Some social media may want to verify your password before you can approve an ...


1

The attack vectors remain the same. The only difference is that mobile phones might provide an additional attack surface with other services reachable like Bluetooth and GSM/UMTS/GPRS/... Check public vulnerability databases for entries regarding WLAN or other network issues to determine the known attack surface of mobile devices. Once in a while there is ...


1

Depends on the level of packet capture they are doing. If they are doing full packet capture with ssl/tls interception then yes. You don't have to be the NSA to do this kind of interception but it is not something that most businesses will want to pay for.



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