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4

For WPA, The authentication process is known as a four-way handshake. It's a bit complex to describe but in short, the access point will know that there was an unsuccessful attempt to connect, but it will not know what key was actually supplied. Fortunately, this would mean that the bogus wifi ap will not be able to figure out the key to the "real" ap. ...


3

Bittorrent trackers often operate on the same port 80 that web servers do, and data transfers don't operate on a fixed port. Port blocking isn't an effective way to block Bittorrent traffic, rather, your router needs to support deep packet inspection to identify and block the transfers. Consumer-grade routers almost never support deep packet inspection.


3

If you use Tor or a VPN they cannot detect easily (that is without compromising your computer) which sites you visit, but they can still see how much bandwidth you use. And while they will not see the sites you visit they can just suspect the visiting of special sites from the fact that you try to hide it.


3

The user isn't trying to attack over wifi. They're trying to attack over the Internet. Aug 30 20:28:09 dropbear[6799]: Child connection from ::ffff:5.10.69.82:38463 Aug 30 20:28:11 dropbear[6799]: login attempt for nonexistent user from ::ffff:5.10.69.82:38463 Aug 30 20:28:12 dropbear[6799]: exit before auth: Disconnect received ::ffff:5.10.69.82 is ...


2

It mostly depends on the password length. In a tradeoff you can download WPA Tables to crack the PSK faster, if it is in the dictionary used to create the tables.


2

The difference is exactly the same as the language suggest. "Shared key" means that the same key is used by several party. It doesn't tell you how the key was distributed among them. "pre-shared key" means the key has been shared before the current operational context. To go you two examples: When you perform a Diffie-Hellman key exchange in an SSL ...


1

Look for routers that provide the level of control that you require for your environment (how detailed can you get when defining firewall rules, etc.) Look for routers that are updated frequently. Apple routers update frequently, as does WRT firmware options. You buy a router for defined security (#1) and you want to prevent backdoors and vulns (#2)


1

How about PFsense on a PCEngines Alix or APU router? Wifi won't be more secure, as it's the protocol, but pfsense can monitor your network I believe. This is on my list as well, just haven't found the time to do this. http://www.pcengines.ch/order1.php?c=2


1

You could configure the access point to use WPA2-Enterprise and then configure your radius server to use OTP as a password. This would mean the user enters the OTP as a password. One thing to note, is that the client does not know its a OTP and might save the profile (which will not work next time since the OTP is spent), thus causing headaches for the ...


1

For simple authentication many vendors propose this in the form of a captive portal that asks users for an OTP before allowing them access to the Internet. However, this doesn't protect the actual Wi-Fi network and if it's an open hotspot (no encryption), then users can still eavesdrop on each other's traffic unless secure protocols such as HTTPS are used. ...


1

TP-Link routers, like most home routers I know about, maintain a system log that one can view through the web browser administrative interface. You could use a cast-off computer to read the log file repeatedly and do something like send an SMS message any time there's a new connection, or when the number of connections reaches a threshold, etc. You might ...


1

You can use ARP scanner like netdiscover / arp-scan for Linux, arping for Windows or Fing for Android devices. It simply sends ARP Request messages in your network (starting from the first available IP address for devices in your subnet), and says "for your IP (ip address of the host), give me the MAC address". If there is a host on that IP, it will reply ...


1

I'm not sure if there is a way to monitor your router in real time but most routers show you how many users are connected when you log into its admin interface. The interface is usually accessed via a well know address - e.g. 192.168.1.1. You should check your router manual to find out the exact address. Another option which may be supported by your router ...


1

Google have a list containing the MAC addresses and all the towers on a determined location. He can collect that data not only by the street view car, but from Android phones as well. It's easy (for Google) to know the GPS coordinates of every cellphone tower on a city (or country), so correlating it with the data your phone sends is enough to get a very ...


1

Every user leaves a lot of traces independent of their IP address. If you access web sites they store cookies, do browser fingerprinting etc. If you move from network to network the IP changes, but the computer specific properties stay. If they really want detect you, they will attack you with malware (drive-by-download) so that even anonymized access with ...


1

The attack can be traced only to the router the attacker is connected to . If the attacker is using the same web-browser, there is a possibility that he can be tracked because most web-browsers have their own/unique fingerprint. This own/unique fingerprint will not include cookies but will include all other information the browser exposes . The footprint ...



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