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20

According to Whatsapp, all message traffic between the server and your phone are encrypted. The same applies for iMessage. The initial contact for iMessage is initiated via normal SMS, and does not travel through the wifi network. Therefore, it will not be possible (barring homebrew crypto security flaws) for your employer to read messages that pass ...


20

Yep. Open wireless networks are entirely unencrypted; anyone can see all the data you send (even if they aren't connected to the network).


10

an open wireless connection means there is no password exchange required to connect to the network. most data used over an open wireless connection is easily observed. once connected however, there are ways to encrypt your data such as using a vpn. This would allow data to be encrypted over an open wireless connection like public hotspots. though an observer ...


5

You mention two distinct technologies: an access portal and client isolation. In comments you say you are not talking about the access portal part, but rather client isolation. Most consumer and corporate access points and wireless controllers I have touched have this feature. It is simply built-in to the hardware you are working with, usually a checkbox ...


4

You could try using a proxy or vpn somewhere to tunnel your traffic through a secure pipe before 'going out to the web'. Many newer routers have vpn built in so you could set something up at home... that way the traffic between your device -> work wifi -> home would be encrypted, then from home -> web would be the only 'open' traffic.


4

802.1X is NOT an encryption type. It is basically just a per-user (e.g. username and password) authentication mechanism. WPA2 is a security scheme that specifies two main aspects of your wireless security: Authentication: Your choice of PSK ("Personal") or 802.1X ("Enterprise"). Encryption: Always AES-CCMP. If you're using WPA2 security on your network, ...


3

You're missing the bigger question: why? Encryption adds greatly to the coffee shop's cost. There are small one-time costs incurred when someone has to configure the access points, assign passwords, manage them, change them, post signs saying "this week's password is C0ffeebuck$" etc. There is an ongoing high payroll cost, too. Baristas are paid to ...


3

WPA is the authentication and encryption system preventing people not knowing the right password to access a Wifi network. However, no matter if it is WPA2 protected or not, you may legitimately not trust Wifi networks from hotels and other public places. The usual advice in such condition is to use a VPN. It is an application which will build a secured ...


3

Different Encryption Key Per User It is important to start by clarifying your question since terminology is important when discussing encryption: I think a more pointed question in pursuit of your goal is "What technology would allow a sufficiently different encryption key per user, so that when multiple users are on the same AP it would be very difficult ...


3

There are a number a possible causes. Check if your wireless device is configured to drop connections when the signal strength drops below some minimum threshold, I've known a number of devices to have this "feature". That's only a potential issue if you have a weak signal though. Also check that your SSID is unique so that it isn't clashing with another ...


2

These types of question has depends answers. The answer varies depending on the policies of owner of open WiFi and plans among other factors. but This question specially has 2 aspects: (second aspect may be your answer) First one: connecting people to an open WiFi network, without having the owner's permission and following his/her terms of service is ...


2

Wireless networks that do not ask for password sen data over the air unencrypted and anyone can : Scan your pc/phone to actively try to exploit a component in your hardware all data via http:// e.g cookies,downloads,images,passwords and email sent Do Arp Spoofing Additionally you can't even be sure that the Wi-fi network is legitimate. That's all i ...


2

The quick answer is "no". We know from long experience that nothing is "perfectly" secure. AES has no significant flaws that we know about today, and has key sizes that are large enough to resist brute force attacks forever. People have been studying it for a decade, looking for weaknesses, and have only come up with some weak keys, and reduced round ...


2

If a site is not using SSL, then assume anyone, from you to the destination, can read your messages. If the site uses SSL, then you may or may not be safe. If your employer is using a content filtering proxy, such as BlueCoat or Websense, then they may use an SSL certificate to decrypt and read your messages. This is often done to ensure that confidential ...


1

Any network owner can see where your packets are headed, and scrape their metadata for nefarious purposes. And on a company network you can't count on a proxy to keep your communications secure. Your only option if you want privacy from the system admins at work is a VPN, preferably one natively supported by iOS and not done through an app using an API ...


1

Can an employer see what I'm doing on my iPhone whilst logged onto wifi Yes, but much of this depends on the apps themselves. I use apps like whatsapp and iMessages to communicate when I need to, can my employer see the content of those messages (actually read what I'm sending and receiving) or can they just see that I have been logged into whatsapp ...


1

The answer is TMSI generation in real systems is weak and hence it cannot protect from tracking. There is an excellent research done which answers your question. Here is the paper and here is the presentation slides. Here is an executive summary from that paper. Pesudonym (TMSI) changing mechanism impletented in realtime networks is flawed, and hence ...


1

Even with WPA2/AES, someone can see the password, or if that is not possible, here is a simple way:- See some people who come around daily. Get some backdoors or rootkits for them. It would require skill but anything on same network/file share can be hacked. Go in, connect to your internet, get the key, and voila. As simple as that. So no amount of ...


1

To check for information about nearby networks using an inbuilt OS X utility called Wireless Diagnostics, follow the steps: 1. Option+Click on the WIFI Menu Icon. 2. Click on "Open Wireless Diagnostics". 3. As Wireless Diagnostics opens, go to Menu Item "Window" and select 'Scan'. This will show you information about nearby networks. Hope that helps.


1

I suspect this is to prevent inadvertient activation of service. Imagine you have bougt a one-hour pass to use at a later time. When you start up your computer, your computer might try to update its antivirus, or may try to download some windows updates, thus prematurely starting your one-hour pass when you dont want. Thus, they have a captcha to activate ...


1

Since one factor is the awkwardness of entering passwords, especially on a tablet. there is a good argument to stick with alphanumerics and forget about symbols. It's also a more general problem, website passwords and such, that most symbols are rejected. But since you only need the enter the password once per device. there's not a huge obstacle there. ...


1

You should be more worried about rouge access points and de-auth attacks not the encryption on your access point. The encryption on WPA2 is pretty secure, so hackers generally don't attack it. Instead hackers usually will try to get the client to connect to a rouge (evil) access point that they control. If they can get a person to connect to the rouge ...


1

This entirely depends on the infrastructure behind the wireless AP you are connected to. What can be seen more less: Phone Model, Location, Used Services, Used or In Usage Applications (such as application names), Bandwidth usage, Total amount of data spend per application.(both incoming and outgoing), Visited web sites(url list) and total amount of ...


1

Is this the type of behavior you are referring to? What is a VAP? Every VAP appears as an independent AP to the client. The VAPs emulate the operations of a physical AP at the MAC level. All wireless management traffic that would be transmitted by one physical AP is also transmitted by the VAP. For example, a single physical AP might ...


1

I solve it for both WPA and WPA2 using MIC_SET, ACK and NONCE fields. MIC_SET | ACK | NONCE | Packet Number 0 | 1 | x | 1 1 | 0 | x | 2 1 | 1 | x | 3 1 | 0 | 0 | 4 Where with x I indicate that the NONCE has a value different of ...



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