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115

No, you are just being paranoid. You were probably already connected to him over WiFi. There are many attacks he could have run this way without additional devices. Also if he would have wanted to hack you, he would not have thrown his strange hacking device in your face. He would have hidden it below the table. Side note: I feel like most of the people ...


106

Perhaps he was using one of these wireless chargers that are built into the tables. It certainly fits your description.


34

I don't know what that gizmo is, but unless you've got a really bizarre laptop, it wouldn't be useful for attacking your computer. Outside of a laboratory setting, attacking a computer means using its standard input or output capabilities. An ordinary wifi or Bluetooth antenna can reach your laptop from anywhere in the room; a directional antenna can ...


9

As @cremefraiche said, the object fits the profile of an wireless iPod/iPhone charger. As the coil works as an antenna, it could theoretically be used to send data from the device. To investigate if this device is charger or a surveillance bug, you can try to pry it open. If the 30-pin connector has anything else than the power-lines connected, it is ...


7

Take a look at the WiFi Pineapple, which is a wireless MITM impersonization device available for $100 plus shipping. The attacker pretty much only has to power it up and configure it, and it will start offering instant MITM attacks. If a mobile device is probing for an already-known open SSID, it will happily provide it with a working internet connection. ...


4

Although I agree with the other posters that the device in question probably was not a hack attempt, I disagree with their conclusion that he was not trying to hack you. In fact, I recommend adopting the strategy that everybody is trying to hack your equipment. That sounds paranoid, but it leads to the type of security that is more difficult (i.e. ...


4

This is not secure, as you have not isolated the guest network. They are still able to reach your 192.168.1.3 client. I guess the reason why it do not respond to ping, is because it is configured not to respond to ping. The host firewall on this computer probably block most of the traffic anyway. If you want to isolate the wifi clients in a proper way ...


3

You've got it hooked up backwards if you want to secure your network against guests. Computers on the 192.168.0.0/24 network can freely access computers on the 192.168.1.0/24 network. If you want to use double-NAT to create a guest network, you need to place the guest network closer to the Internet connection than the network you want to protect from them. ...


3

If your laptop has an RFID/NFC reader (some Dell laptops have them) then yes an antenna can be used to "talk" to the laptop and exploit a vulnerability in the reader's driver, but readers are usually placed near the touchpad rather than behind the laptop, and while this antenna can most likely send any data to the reader, I doubt it's sensitive enough to ...


3

In a WiFi network, all information which is sent over the network is broadcasted over the air. Usually network interfaces are configured to just ignore any network traffic not addressed to them, but there are tools available which change them to "promiscuous mode" which allows them to also log and show any traffic which they receive even though it is ...


2

If you control the network, there really isn't an advantage (under almost any circumstances). What a VPN does is simulate having a leased line from your computer to the network the VPN server is on. If you are already on that network, there is literally no advantage (unless you enjoy encryption overhead). There is one main exception: if you control the ...


2

Client devices will actively probe known networks regardless if SSID broadcasting for that particular network is turned on or not. While a passive scan is theoretically possible, it is very seldom implemented. This is because the client needs to cycle through all channels, spending time on each channel to listen for beacons. This would increase the amount of ...


2

The thing about a VPN is that the connection between your computer and the VPN end point is encrypted. If you go to Joe's Coffee House and use their public WiFi, depending on the configuration it is possible that anyone in the range of your WiFi radio can snoop on your traffic. Even if Joe has secured his WiFi properly, anyone with access to the physical ...


1

Barring unforeseen weaknesses in protocols or implementations of your VPN service, this should give you a reasonable expectation of privacy. All of your traffic that traverses the VPN will be encrypted from your system to the VPN provider. At that point it will travel normally. To your specific question of emails and login details, those should also be ...


1

The device looks like a FM antenna; there were also some 3G/LTE routers that look almost like that (now they're mostly soapbar or cube shaped, it seems). It has happened to me to be connected to a WiFi and a cell network, or run diagnostics on one while connected to the other. And fiddling with a cell antenna's position in the hope of getting better ...


1

Your friend is likely using a network packets capture tool like wireshark or tcpdump to collect data that are transferred from and to your machine. At least to make it hard to your friend you have to use services or websites that offer data encryption which is commonly implemented using TLS, for instance when you are browsing a website make sure the website ...



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