Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

Rogue access points can certainly be dangerous, but there is a caveat: If the "real" network is encrypted, you cannot set up a rogue access point without knowing the key. Rogue access points must have exactly the same security settings as the original access points, including the same key. If they do not have the same key, clients will try to connect but ...


4

If you don't have permission, breaking into someone else's network is illegal regardless of why you're doing so. If you really want to learn about the security vulnerabilities of WPA-PSK and WEP, I recommend setting up your own AP and practice breaking into it.


3

Make sure you're using WPA2 with a strong password. Change the password. Use a Wifi Analyzer to make sure you're on the least crowded channel you can be. Disable WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup), pin can be brute forced. Change default router configuration login That's all you can really do, and all you need to do. (I do not consider MAC address filtering ...


3

Your best bet for security would be a secure tunnel between the gateway router you will insert into the network and a 'safe' outside point. This could be a server you've rented, or you could use one of many VPN providers who exist. Of course the 'safety' of said server/VPN provider is variable, but it means any traffic you send via that gateway router will ...


3

In general, no. To a large extent, Bluetooth can be though of as a wireless replacement for the cables connecting your headset, keyboard, etc. to your phone; the hypothetical device involved works by imitating the phone keypad. Wifi is strictly a replacement for your network cable; your phone does not accept user-interface input from it. That said, it's ...


3

Simply put, unless you're talking about WPA2-Enterprise with EAP, there's no verification. Wifi networks are identified by SSID alone, so if you rename your home wifi network to "attwifi" and remove the password, chances are you'll get quite a few strangers' devices automatically connecting to it. This would be called a rogue access point. Of course, if ...


2

The only identifying information that the card sends is the MAC address. However, other parts of your system can send identifying information as well. For example, the DHCP client may send your computer's name to the DHCP server; if you browse the web, you can be identified through browser fingerprinting.


2

There are several ways to view who's on your network, some easier/less technical than others: The logging feature in your router; Sometimes you can view currently connected devices. For example in a FritzBox you can see all devices that have a dhcp lease (i.e. which got an IP address) on the "Home Network" page. You could scan the network from your laptop ...


2

I assume the question is about the "server" certificates used by PEAP, EAP-TLS, and EAP-TTLS to protect password authentication, as this wouldn't be a problem at all with client-certificate-based EAP-TLS. I doubt the EAP standards documents would ever have this information, given the crazy inconsistency across implementations (which surely wouldn't be as ...


2

The things that I would do in your situation (as a start -- this is not a definitive list) are (in order) : To preclude the possibility that hackers have "backdoored" your router so that they can always get back into your supposedly "private" local network from the public Internet, buy a new router (a good one... not the cheapest one you can get) and ...


2

I don't think so. There are sources that indicate that in addition to collecting the SSID, Google is also collecting the BSSID. The idea was to take the SSIDs and BSSIDs from the collected packets of data, and to store them in a database together with the information about the location where the SSIDs and BSSIDs were seen. Source and Google and ...


2

Unfortunately your question is lacking some details, but I can give you some food for thought on this that will help put this in context. First of all there are different protocols that could be used for an attack such as ICMP, or UDP or TCP. Without knowing more about the target or type of traffic generated it's hard to truly predict what impact it would ...


1

In order to act as a proper access point, your card needs to support "master"/"AP" mode. You can fake it if the card supports "monitor" mode with packet injection (in this case, your AP software will be performing many of the tasks that the driver/card would be performing in "master" mode), and you can get some of the functionality of an AP if your card ...


1

In the scenario you have outlined it is in fact possible, at least in theory, to sniff the connection. Okay, so WEP is easy to crack, and if you are using, you should stop and get on to WPA2, which is far more secure, and nearly impossible to break. In each of these cases you will need to have some sort of password/key set up. If it's just your own access ...


1

Yes. Pretty straight forward information provided by each wireless access point. For instance in Android, this is what this information looks like in Wifi Analyzer: Only the security types listed for an access point will be accepted.


1

Yes, ofcourse that is possible! Almost any device that can wirelessly connect using WiFi, also has an interface for connecting to it right? I'm pretty sure that almost ALL devices, when prompted for a password say something like: "This network is using WPA2 Protection, please enter your password" or: "This network is useng an Enterprise Security, ...


1

Check your router/AP documentation for a logging option. Turn it on if it's off, and look at the logs. Do this every day for a week or so to develop an idea of what is "normal." Then look every week or so. After you've looked for a while, whether you spot an intruder or not, change the AP password.


1

There is absolutely no way to verify an AP out in the wild. Like user54791 said, you only see the SSID, and there are no built-in safeguards in the AP nor smartphones that can guarantee that the AP you want to connect to is actually the correct one. This is exactly why I do not trust ANY wifi, free or not. And as a matter of fact, its the "paid" wifi you ...


1

You won't be able to do this with the stock firmware. You should change over to openWRT to do what you want. Download the .iso from here. (I recently installed the Attitude Adjustment iso). Go into troubleshooting (I think) and on the right hand side it says update firmware. Just point it to the ISO and you will have a much more flexible router. From ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible