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12

Looking at the OUI, it appears you have 3 Apple MACs connected, 1 Netgear MAC, and 3 unknown MACs. The Apple and Netgear MACs may be spoofed; please compare them against your own devices. Then, if you can, compare their traffic against the legitimate device's traffic to see if those MAC's are being spoofed. The unknown MACs are almost certainly spoofed. ...


9

If you want to penetest a wifi. The wifi card would need to support monitor mode. However vmware uses it's own usb drivers so you might want to install kali to your hard drive or run it off a cd/usb. If you want to pick up weak signal's you need a card with high watt's and a good antenna www.alfa.com.tw has some high power wifi cards at a reasonable price.


7

Though the OSI model is more often a source of confusion than enlightenment, it is here reasonably informative. The WiFi encryption occurs in layer 2 ("data link") because it strives to embody a security feature which is inherently related to the data link. Namely, WiFi was designed to be the over-the-air equivalent of wired Ethernet. In Ethernet networks, ...


6

There are plenty of wireless cards to choose from in this area. The best in my opinion is the trusty old alfa AWUS036H with the rtl8187 chip-set. This card has been my favorite for a long time and is still going strong after years of persistent use. The alfa is also 'plug and play' for pretty much all Linux distros and has good drivers for windows with only ...


5

Most WiFi enabled devices broadcast their Mac address when probing for networks to join in the vicinity. By placing your own WiFi device in promiscuous/listening mode and utilizing a tool like Aircrack-ng, you can see and record all broadcast traffic enabling you to see if a device with a specific MAC address comes within earshot of your listening device. ...


4

You may already be safe: if you typed your IP address into the address bar of a computer connected to the router, being able to access the router admin page is normal. The router knows your computer is on the "inside" part of the network, and should be allowed to control the router. The only time you have a problem is if you type your IP address into a ...


4

Your wireless card needs to run in 'promiscuous' mode. Only a few can and work with wireshark, but they are known. In a switched LAN environment, you would only see broadcast traffic from other users, like you say, but in a wifi environment, there is no switch and everyone sees everything. Each wifi device is broadcasting over the air. Wireshark is the ...


3

Consider checking the Aircrack wiki if in doubt. It's also a good idea to Google + kali/backtrack to see if anyone has had any problems with a card you are considering. Be sure to check the date though. Someone saying it didn't work in 2005 is not helpful. Also look for one with a removable antenna. They usually come with 2-3 inch ones, but if you can ...


3

This is based on my answer to Devices with cryptic names and Chinese ip addresses connected to my router but adjusted for hotspots (i.e. no web interface), since the same general steps apply; the difference in questions is that they didn't know what the devices were (and still don't - some are spoofed), and you see a Samsung MAC (which may also be spoofed, ...


3

You may be having difficultly because it's not a network based interception of http, it's a radio based interception of data at layer 1 (physical). Essentially, on a wired network: Layer 1 (physical): Copper or fiber wires and physical devices (NIC, GBIC, switch, router, firewall). Interception at Layer 1 (i.e. using port mirroring on a switch to direct ...


3

I believe spartan is talking about Wifi "probe requests". You can capture these using wireshark when your wireless adapter is set to "monitor mode". You can filter for them using the following syntax: wlan.fc.type_subtype == 0x04 These are managment frames and are basically frames sent from your client to find out which wireless networks / AP are ...


2

The answer is yes, he can see what you're doing on the internet when he is connected to your WiFi network. The encryption protocol used is pretty much irrelevant. Whilst WPA2 will generate a unique session key for each client association, if the attacker captures this he can still decrypt your traffic. Even if the attacker doesn't capture it, he can forge ...


2

Is it possible to hack your WiFi and then use your computer? Possible, yes. Likely, no. To be able to 'use' your computer remotely, they would need to have some kind of shell access, use that to open a browser and check their email. Not something you would expect a hacker to do. Is it possible to see if someone had access to your WiFi? Yes, ...


1

You could go and do a GeoIP lookup on the IP address, given that it's not spoofed (which 9/10 times it is). If the IP isn't hopping too much, you could create a drop rule to block traffic from that IP. You may even be able to drop the subnet given all the source IP's are in that subnet. It seems like they are throwing random attacks at you. There isn't a ...


1

Did anyone else have physical access to your computer? While it is technically possible for someone else to access your wifi and then to hack in to your computer, there is no good reason for them to do so just to use the web. If the attacker had actually broken in to your Wifi, there would be no reason to need to use your computer unless they wanted ...


1

TLDR: Basically with what you're asking, only ARP broadcasts, unless you subnet your wireless from your wired network. Overall it depends. First, your computer on the ethernet may occasionally send out broadcasts to the whole network. For example, if it needs the MAC address of a machine on the local network, it will send out an ARP broadcast to all ...


1

You asked quite a lot of different questions here. I'll try answering each. Spoofing/sniffing: The cure is encryption. More specifically Public Key Infrastructure. Then B can't modify (or even decrypt) data that it's relaying. The only question here is how you want to implement the key exchange (so that it can't be attacked). Open ports: An open port is ...


1

Think a bit outside the box. What's WLAN in hardware? A pair of antennas broadcasting and receiving. Where is that antenna at your device sending to? Directionally to the hotspot? No, it is sending everywhere, in every direction, hoping the hotspot picks it up. When the network doesn't use a password, this signal is unencrypted. All you need to eavesdrop is ...


1

The answer to your question is, no. with a WPA-PSK authenticated network, the PSK is never actually sent over the wire, the protocol is designed to prove that both the client machine (a.k.a station) and Access point have the same key before commencing communication. If an attacker can sniff the traffic sent between the station and the access point during ...


1

The closest thing to a 'hello' packet concept in a smart phone, which mostly use TCP/IP, will probably be a DHCP-DISCOVER broadcast and then subsequent ARP requests, presuming it is active on the network. Most smart phones will probably respond to ping, too, so presuming you have control over DHCP on the network, once you know its IP address, send pings to ...



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