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49

It is unlikely a hacker stealing internet access will have the sophistication (or need) to make the wireless network change between different names. It is more likely that someone/some device nearby installed a new wireless network that happen to broadcast on the same channel as yours (there are only 3 or 4 non-overlapping ones to choose from) and have a ...


9

Here are some things you can try that may help you out. As you stated that you are not too computer savvy, I'll not be giving you any difficult instruction if I can help it. Possibly try turning off your router when not in use. This may reset your password to the default (I believe this might be printed on the device itself) If you can plug a hard line ...


7

To your fear that a local hacker is trying to compromise your internet connection and/or your computer, it's actually quite hard to "fake" an WPA2-AES protected access point: the handshake doesn't expose the key and if there were a rogue device posing as the AT&T router, the handshake would fail with an error message. So, as long as you heeded any ...


6

For sites that use HTTPS, the owner of the network (the school in your case) can see what domains you visit, e.g. facebook.com, but not what you do there - what pages you visit, what Friends you poke, what password you enter, etc. Facebook, Gmail, etc. use HTTPS. For sites use HTTP instead of HTTPS, your school can see all of the above, including your ...


3

It is possible in theory, but this does not make it having actually happened. It is equally possible that whoever said that did it just to mess with your son's head, and yours. We'd need to know what the exact make and model (if possible even firmware revision) your router is. The WiFi router is essentially a small PC and it is sometimes (depending on the ...


2

Most places that provide free WiFi just don't care about security, and they want to make it as easy as possible for customers to connect. Since users of such open WiFi by-and-large don't care about security either, there's not much pressure for them to change that mentality. However it's not really as difficult to secure such a network as others here have ...


2

This is happening because your AP is able to filter out the MAC address and block it after an x amount of requests. What you need to do is to change the MAC address every x requests so the router won't be able to lock you out. Use reaver mac address changer: Reaver -i mon0 -c x -b xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx -vv --mac=vv:vv:vv:vv:vv:vv Warning: This might crash your ...


2

In theory yes it has its dangers like: Someone can "Borrow" your connection Someone can do packet sniffing All these dangers only apply for users who are connected. But since your phone doesn't have an IP for the control panel and your control panel is local and does not need access from an IP, no they could not get to your control panel. All the data ...


1

Yes but this is not an issue with the VPN protocol per se its more an issue with data leakage of traffic exiting through that connection. Specifically there are many ways in which geolocation can be done against the client via a number of protocols. In your case the most relevant one would be using client-side javascript to capture the wireless SSID and ...


1

In creating WPA2-AES, priority was given to 1) using the passphrase to ensure that the client was authorized to use the system, and 2) ensuring that there was no way for the client to inadvertently expose the passphrase to someone posing as the host. It succeeds at these two things. It was not created with the intention of providing full secrecy between ...



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