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133

No, you are just being paranoid. You were probably already connected to him over WiFi. There are many attacks he could have run this way without additional devices. Also if he would have wanted to hack you, he would not have thrown his strange hacking device in your face. He would have hidden it below the table. Side note: I feel like most of the people ...


118

Yes, you should be worried. You should contact the hotel staff, and you should not use the network any more. It is likely the router’s DNS is manipulated. It is possible that the hotel wants to make some money on the side by injecting ads. However, this script looks evil. It tries to open a dialog that tricks you into installing a trojan by displaying a ...


113

Perhaps he was using one of these wireless chargers that are built into the tables. It certainly fits your description.


50

Yes they can but unless your neighbor has the required technical expertise, its highly doubtful. To view incoming and outgoing traffic you need specific software to monitor network packets and the tech knowledge to actually do it. Most routers only keep a syslog and unless they are using software like wireshark to monitor/capture your packets, they cannot ...


38

If you get a VPN and use that for browsing, that will hide all your traffic from both your neighbour and their ISP.


37

If you're using a machine controlled by the LAN administrator, then you have to assume they can read anything you do on it. They could have software to log your activity, they could have installed extra SSL certificates that allow them to MITM your connection to GMail. If you believe your computer has not been tampered with and is not under the control of ...


36

I don't know what that gizmo is, but unless you've got a really bizarre laptop, it wouldn't be useful for attacking your computer. Outside of a laboratory setting, attacking a computer means using its standard input or output capabilities. An ordinary wifi or Bluetooth antenna can reach your laptop from anywhere in the room; a directional antenna can ...


29

What about using tor? Keep in mind that your speed will be affected*. As other people said, using any private mode in your browser is not going to be of any help. *EDIT: The slowdown heavily depends on the network topology, the number of nodes, how much traffic the nodes are handling and what you are downloading. Here you can find some explanations about ...


25

Yes they can actually. What it boils down to is that they can see which websites you are running by looking at: Clear HTTP traffic DNS requests sent One thing you could do is purchase an encrypted VPN and run all your internet traffic through the VPN. This way your neighbours will not be able to see what you are doing.


22

To complement @David's and @Steve's answers: If the attacker ("Adam", in your case) has administrative access to your machine, then he can learn all your secrets. Installing an extra root CA, under his control, to run routine MitM interception on your SSL connections is a popular tools for honest (but nosy) sysadmins: it is a one-time installation which ...


21

MAC address filtering is a very weak form of wifi protection: the MAC addresses of your devices can be easily eavesdropped with tools like wireshark the MAC addresses of their devices can be easily changed (OS dependent, but typically an option in Network Settings). MAC address filtering is annoying to maintain. You have to login to your router ...


17

You can't. It doesn't matter whether the wifi is encrypted or not: you can't know whether the access point is trustworthy. A WPA2 access point with a strong password doesn't help when the access point itself is a rogue access point put up by someone who may or may not be the café or hotel owner. And yes, it happens — people put up open access points with ...


17

As David says, the provider of your network usually can't see data passed over https connections. However, your Gmail address is not necessarily passed only over https connections. For example, if you log into StackExchange using your secret Gmail account and visit the http (not https) version of your user profile page, then your Gmail address is sent to ...


13

Without looking at the code: Yes, you should be worried! Nobody should tamper with your internet traffic, as this opens many possible threat scenarios. Even if you try to open any page and it is showing a page instead that is asking for the WiFi credentials this is impossible, as the router has first redirected your DNS query and then pretends to be the ...


12

Looking at the OUI, it appears you have 3 Apple MACs connected, 1 Netgear MAC, and 3 unknown MACs. The Apple and Netgear MACs may be spoofed; please compare them against your own devices. Then, if you can, compare their traffic against the legitimate device's traffic to see if those MAC's are being spoofed. The unknown MACs are almost certainly spoofed. ...


11

When my laptop is using a network I don't control (basically anything that's not home) it wears pretty red socks to reroute all traffic into the SOCKS5 proxy built into OpenSSH and then to a server I rent anyways for my website to protect my traffic. You can use tor as well but I intensely dislike tor (for reasons off topic here). This is the socks_up ...


11

As @cremefraiche said, the object fits the profile of an wireless iPod/iPhone charger. As the coil works as an antenna, it could theoretically be used to send data from the device. To investigate if this device is charger or a surveillance bug, you can try to pry it open. If the 30-pin connector has anything else than the power-lines connected, it is ...


10

In practice, it depends on the router they're using (and, specifically, on the firmware it's running). Basically all home WiFi routers have the technical ability to log visited URLs, as long as their firmware includes such a feature (and it's not exactly a complicated one). The main questions are: whether the router firmware supports such a logging ...


9

If you want to penetest a wifi. The wifi card would need to support monitor mode. However vmware uses it's own usb drivers so you might want to install kali to your hard drive or run it off a cd/usb. If you want to pick up weak signal's you need a card with high watt's and a good antenna www.alfa.com.tw has some high power wifi cards at a reasonable price.


7

Changing the Default SSID would serve no particular security purpose where it's not entirely predictable (e.g. 'netgear'). It would allow you to easily identify your wireless network though, if there are lots of others about. It used to be the case where companies used one string for all their APs that it was relevant to Rainbow table generation (more ...


7

Though the OSI model is more often a source of confusion than enlightenment, it is here reasonably informative. The WiFi encryption occurs in layer 2 ("data link") because it strives to embody a security feature which is inherently related to the data link. Namely, WiFi was designed to be the over-the-air equivalent of wired Ethernet. In Ethernet networks, ...


7

I'm an enterprise penetration tester for my company, and breaking into systems is what I do day in and day out. I'll share some of the techniques I use to perform man-in-the-middle attacks, to give you an idea of what to look for (as well as how to defend). If none of these scenarios sounds like something you encountered, then there's a significant ...


7

Take a look at the WiFi Pineapple, which is a wireless MITM impersonization device available for $100 plus shipping. The attacker pretty much only has to power it up and configure it, and it will start offering instant MITM attacks. If a mobile device is probing for an already-known open SSID, it will happily provide it with a working internet connection. ...


6

I mean they cannot steal my Paypal credentials because they are encrypted, all they can do is access stuff which is not that important to me in the first place. This is a huge assumption. An attacker could use something like sslstrip to change all references of HTTPS to HTTP. It is quite common for websites to serve content via HTTP and use an ...


6

There are plenty of wireless cards to choose from in this area. The best in my opinion is the trusty old alfa AWUS036H with the rtl8187 chip-set. This card has been my favorite for a long time and is still going strong after years of persistent use. The alfa is also 'plug and play' for pretty much all Linux distros and has good drivers for windows with only ...


6

Yes, hidden network still send a beacon frame, just without the SSID. Your wireless hardware sends the estimated received power level to Aircrack-NG. It could be due to unsupported hardware or your hardware is not able to come up with a good power figure for the signal. Check out this forum for some older info, and look at their hardware compatibility list ...


6

I felt compelled to offer a less paranoid answer, having at times myself used "untrusted" networks for otherwise secure transactions. It is certainly true that a network where data is transported via plaintext is susceptible to man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks. In such a network, both the data you receive and the data you send can potentially be read and ...


6

Although I agree with the other posters that the device in question probably was not a hack attempt, I disagree with their conclusion that he was not trying to hack you. In fact, I recommend adopting the strategy that everybody is trying to hack your equipment. That sounds paranoid, but it leads to the type of security that is more difficult (i.e. ...


5

EAP-TLS really encapsulates a SSL/TLS handshake, in which both server and client send each other a certificate. This has the following properties: When the server sends a certificate, it actually sends a certificate chain, including the CA which issued it, and the CA above it, and so on, up to the root (the root itself may be sent, but this is optional). ...


5

Preventing the camera from talking to the outside world is trivial, or nigh impossible, depending on how evil the camera is. On one hand, any decent router should be able to block or not-block traffic from any local IP to the outside world; therefore, you may configure your router to: assign a specific IP address to the camera (based on its MAC address); ...



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