Hot answers tagged

72

There are two different passwords that access different functions. If an attacker has the admin password, then he / she can change the SSID, WiFi password, and any other settings on the WiFi router. To fix: ensure your WiFi security setting is WPA or WPA2. Then change the WiFi password to a long one (at least 12 characters, more is better) with special ...


66

Short answer is yes. If there is any logging on their WiFi router they might not be able to see exact apps, but they'll be able to see the server domain/hostnames that you're connecting to. You can also look at these question and answers: Is there a way for my ISP or LAN admin to learn my Gmail address? Can an employer see cellular network traffic routed ...


59

This is actually exactly the type of environment VPNs were designed to work in: when you cannot trust the local network. If set up properly (i.e. making sure all traffic goes through the VPN and using a secure mutual authentication scheme) it will pretty well protect your connection. This, however, requires the whole thing to be designed properly. ...


49

It is unlikely a hacker stealing internet access will have the sophistication (or need) to make the wireless network change between different names. It is more likely that someone/some device nearby installed a new wireless network that happen to broadcast on the same channel as yours (there are only 3 or 4 non-overlapping ones to choose from) and have a ...


46

I see two possible uses of such information from a government perspective. None of them involves the password or actually using your WiFi access. Forensic analysis: connected devices store an history of access points they were connected to, sometimes associated with "last seen" dates. Using this history, it is therefore possible to know where someone was ...


37

Giving the WiFi password away effectively gives full access to the local network. From there the guest might access the other computers inside the same network unless they have an additional protection. The guest can also try to brute force the router password, can mount man in the middle attacks with ARP or DHCP spoofing .... Because of this better routers ...


25

Although it is not one of the things you listed in your question, he can engage in illegal activity over the internet which, when investigated by the authorities will render your IP as the source. Which, depending on the country you live in, may land in you in a lot of trouble.


25

You can't simply Force a client, but to trick him! As long as the device's WiFi is running, it keeps sending probe requests, searching for your previous connected networks. Using some software like airodump-ng, you can easily sniff out those probes. Then the attacker may create a similar evil twin using the BSSID and ESSID gathered from the previous ...


23

If you are not using a VPN, then every site you visit that sends or receives anything sensitive (especially passwords) should be HTTPS rather than just HTTP. The 's' in HTTPS stands for secure which is provided by TLS handshaking and encryption. In effect, when using TLS (i.e. HTTPS, which I refer to interchangeably here) you are effectively using a separate ...


20

So you were redirected to a captive portal page that had an expired certificate. Theoretically this puts in risk only the data you transfer over this particular connection, ie. accepting the rules and eventually your personal or payment data if you had to provide any. In fact the captive portal did not have to use https connection at all and you wouldn't ...


17

It does not take much effort to block P2P etc with current routers and restrict access as this detailed article from 2011 (Lifehacker) shows. But unless you restrict access a lot and thus make users unhappy they will still be able to upload copyrighted content to youtube, make bomb threats etc. If you don't want to deal with these liability issues (which ...


16

This seems like a bureaucratic way of instilling FUD (Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt) in a population. For example in the old Soviet Union, neighbors would routinely spy on neighbors and agencies collected notes on citizens. But the raw data of those notes were so enormous—and the bureaucracy was/is so inneffecient—that the actual information collected was ...


16

WLAN/WiFi can be secure when properly configured (this certainly requires a password or key). Cellphone connections are not really secure. They are encrypted based on a key from your SIM card. This key is also known to your mobile network operator. You do not need a password, but your communication can be intercepted and eavesdropped on by your mobile ...


14

Ok I am changing my answer after reading all the comments. You need to understand the basics: SSID = The SSID is the name of the wireless broadcast from your router. This is not a username. If the person keeps getting in then its possible your security is not WPA2 like you think it is. or your password for the wifi is really weak or common. try a ...


13

There are two (main) modes in which to run WPA2. You can use enterprise mode or pre-shared key (PSK) mode. If you run in enterprise mode you need to set up an authenticating RADIUS server, and configure certificates on the clients that will connect to the access point. Furthermore you need to configure the AP will all the relevant information. This level ...


13

Someone who has administrative access to the network you are connecting to can: View the IP address and domain names of the site you're connecting to (based on DNS query and/or SNI in TLS) and which email provider you're using, irrespective of encryption. You can prevent this by using encrypted third party DNS (e.g. DNSCurve to OpenDNS). The location of ...


11

The attacker did not seem to really try to conceal his track :he could have faked an existing MAC address for instance, or used the classical yagi antenna + high power WiFi adapter to silently intercept your communication. Instead it seems he just used a classical home grade WiFi range extender with what seems to be default settings. So it still seems very ...


11

What you are referring to is called a captive portal. It allows WiFi providers to authorise users, get confirmation for service agreement from them, display ads, require payment for extended usage time, etc. Its existence doesn't have security implications in itself (unless it was poorly implemented and leaking user-provided information, but that is on a ...


9

Whether you company will be able to see the content of your chats depends on a couple of factors Is your access to the chat site encrypted? if you're using SSL, then normally someone running a network you're accessing it over, will not be able to see the content of the chat (although they will likely know the name of the site you're accessing). The ...


9

The article is correct, and a real threat exists in the initial period before the VPN is set up. It's a chicken and egg problem. The VPN configuration doesn't matter in this case, since to establish the VPN connection in the first place, you must first have an internet connection. Many/Most open internet points require you to register with them by ...


9

An expired certificate just means that the certificate didn't got renewed as soon as it should have been. Certificate renewal is a preventive measure for the case that the private key gets stolen without anyone knowing. Replacing a certificate in regular intervals reduces the usefulness of a stolen key. But expiration dates for certificates can be chosen ...


9

Here are some things you can try that may help you out. As you stated that you are not too computer savvy, I'll not be giving you any difficult instruction if I can help it. Possibly try turning off your router when not in use. This may reset your password to the default (I believe this might be printed on the device itself) If you can plug a hard line ...


8

Depending on what they have set up as regards logging and monitoring, yes - this is something they could do. If you have a policy against using the wifi for such things, I'd suggest not doing that, but I guess you could ask. They might not want you doing it when you should be working, however...


8

Brute force is brute force By definition, "brute forcing" a password or key involves trying every single combination of characters until you find the one that works. There are differences in strategy which might be faster: for example if attacking a specific ISP's router you may know that they always assign 8 character upper-case-and-numeric passwords, ...


8

Adding to the already excellent answers. To protect your activity in a Wifi Hotspot with a VPN currently there are two advised technologies, OpenVPN and IPsec. IPsec takes more time to be configured properly, however it is supported natively by more devices. ipsec security: Don’t stop using IPsec just yet Always use Perfect Forward Secrecy (“pfs=yes” ...


7

Any one with sufficient access to the network traffic can detect this, All you need is the capability to see all traffic and how its routed (to what TCP Port and IP). The trick is to detect the 'unusual' signature of a port scan over the rest of the traffic (like sequential trying of random ports / specific well-known ports). This can be quite tricky for ...


7

It depends on several factors. If you restored the PC from sleep/slumber/hibernation, then what you saw was the PC state before sleep, not something that had just been downloaded. No traffic was generated, nothing could possibly have been logged. But the page might have had some active content that was accessing the network. If so, upon restore it might ...


7

Short answer: Yes, for resonable defintions of safe. HSTS protects you against sslstrip type attacks for sites you have visited recently using a non-compromised connection (or for some browsers sites that are stored in a hardcoded "preload list"). The regular SSL CA system protects you against MITM attacks of ssl connections where the attacker has not ...


7

WiFi can be easily sniffed with cheap hardware + software and only properly encrypted WiFi helps against this. But phone calls are not much better: For the traditional old phone system (POTS) you need physical access to the line but once you have this (often available somewhere in the basement) sniffing is very easy too. Old style analog wireless phones ...


7

Since according to your description all systems in your network are affected and independent from the operating system, the chances are high that your router is compromised and the DNS settings are changed. This way most outgoing traffic can be controlled by the attacker which leads to all these redirects to ads. This type of compromise is not uncommon as ...



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