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53

Unprotected Wifi networks, particularly in public places, are most certainly a threat. This is because you are connecting to a network without knowing who else could be on the network. 'Free Wifi' provided by cafes, restaurants, etc serve as excellent places for harvesting passwords. The attacker will perform a Man in the Middle attack, typically by ...


33

First of all that would entirely depend on the encryption used by the access point. There are several types of possible encryption. Mostly on consumer wireless access points these are: WEP WPA WPA2 WPS WEP Let's first dive into WEP. WEP was the first algorithm used to secure wireless access points. Unfortunately it was discovered that WEP had some ...


30

The risk here is in believing that a "hidden SSID" changes anything to the security. A non-hidden SSID means that the router will shout at regular intervals "hello everybody, I am Joe the Router, you may talk to me !". A hidden SSID means that the client machine (not the attacker's machine) will shout at regular intervals "Hey, Joe, where are you ? Please ...


16

You can't. It doesn't matter whether the wifi is encrypted or not: you can't know whether the access point is trustworthy. A WPA2 access point with a strong password doesn't help when the access point itself is a rogue access point put up by someone who may or may not be the café or hotel owner. And yes, it happens — people put up open access points with ...


15

The question (to most people) is an oxymoron. By definition, people will think that "open WiFi" means "un-encrypted WiFi. To me you seem to be asking "Why did the people that wrote the 802.11 standard way back in 1997 make the decisions that they did?" The short answer - we can only find out by asking them (or seeing if there are any discussion documents ...


14

Using valid SSL/TLS connection by making sure you're always connecting to the https:// version of the website and that the browser isn't giving you any warnings or errors, is your first line of defence. An addon called HTTPS Everywhere can be very helpful here. The approach you're proposing (SSH to your trusted network) is a very standard approach. I use it ...


12

The article is a huge amount of FUD and scaremongering, but even if you take the basic info outlined in it then there is only a small worry and it is very easy to protect yourself. if you have your android device set to backup online then yes, it will back up known wifi passwords. This is the same as iPads and other devices that give this cloud backup ...


11

Firesheep has nothing to do with the WiFi encryption. If you and I were both on an encrypted WiFi connection, I would still be able to Firesheep your data. What Firesheep does happens at the router level. It does not intercept the waves on air (well, not exactly) Basically, it runs an ARP spoofing attack. This sort of attack can be run on a LAN network as ...


11

If your bank Web site uses HTTPS, and you dutifully check that the server name in the URL is indeed the expected name, and you don't disregard warnings about unverified or expired certificates, then yes, it is safe. If these conditions are not met, then no, it is not safe -- but it would not be safe from anywhere else either. Public WiFi is not special in ...


11

Non-broadcast wireless networks aren't inherently less secure, but they're not more secure either. Hiding your wireless network (not broadcasting its SSID) doesn't make your network actually hidden as there are many tools that can help you find "hidden" networks, such as Kismet and inSSIDer. If configured to do so, Windows Vista and Windows 7 will have to ...


9

The PSK variants of WPA and WPA2 uses a 256-bit key derived from a password for authentication. The Enterprise variants of WPA and WPA2, also known as 802.1x uses a RADIUS server for authentication purposes. Authentication is achieved using variants of the EAP protocol. This is a more complex but more secure setup. The key difference between WPA and WPA2 ...


9

If you want to penetest a wifi. The wifi card would need to support monitor mode. However vmware uses it's own usb drivers so you might want to install kali to your hard drive or run it off a cd/usb. If you want to pick up weak signal's you need a card with high watt's and a good antenna www.alfa.com.tw has some high power wifi cards at a reasonable price.


7

The other answers have already explained that Firesheep-style attacks (basically MitM trhough ARP spoofing) have nothing to do with WiFi itself. This is a link-layer issue. As for why open WiFi networks don't have encryption. Well, they just don't. I don't really know why they decided not to, I can only speculate. One very obvious reason is MitM attacks, as ...


7

Well you are sending everything over untrusted channel. All communication protocols you use on the internet which do not provide an SSL interface (or similar) which also checks for validity (attackers love to perform MITM on free wireless hot spots) can therefore be sniffed and captured. So the minimum what they would be able to see is what websites you are ...


7

Wireshark or tcpdump would both be useful if you want to dump packets going across the network all you need is to put an interface into promiscuous mode and you should be able to see packets flying across your network. There are lots of tutorials on using wireshark and tcpdump in the interweb. UPDATE: monitoring outgoing network traffic this question also ...


7

Changing the Default SSID would serve no particular security purpose where it's not entirely predictable (e.g. 'netgear'). It would allow you to easily identify your wireless network though, if there are lots of others about. It used to be the case where companies used one string for all their APs that it was relevant to Rainbow table generation (more ...


7

Though the OSI model is more often a source of confusion than enlightenment, it is here reasonably informative. The WiFi encryption occurs in layer 2 ("data link") because it strives to embody a security feature which is inherently related to the data link. Namely, WiFi was designed to be the over-the-air equivalent of wired Ethernet. In Ethernet networks, ...


6

No, the spectrum that is used is well-known and not concealed. You can't conceal that activity is occurring, you can only prevent the SSID from being directly broadcast and encrypt the traffic such that the network can not be spied on without breaking the encryption. The fact that there is radio activity in the spectrum will be apparent to anyone listening ...


6

WPA2 is more secure than WPA as explained by Terry. You just need to understand the difference between personal (pre shared key) and enterprise versions of both the protocols. The personal version is where all the users share a secret password that is configured in the access point. In the enterprise version there is a central authentication server and all ...


6

You can technically start sniffing away without "connecting" to the network. Terry is correct, if the network is open (no encryption, WEP/WPA/WPA2) then you can just "Join" the network and sniff the traffic. However, you do not need to join the network to sniff the traffic. WLANs use radio frequencies, all you have to do is match the freq (channel) and ...


6

There is no extra risk associated with connecting to a hidden network over a non-hidden one. What matters is who else is connected to that network, and what their intentions are. When you connect to any network, you are giving all other users of that network access to a very large surface area in terms of your machine's security. See this answer for more ...


6

The short answer is probably. The actual answer depends entirely on what "good enough" means to you. Do you need to disallow WiFi altogether? Perhaps you really need Ethernet cables run in pressure-monitored shielded conduit run under an access-controlled, video-monitored raised floor with locks on the exposed ports? Okay, that is overkill for almost ...


6

WPA2-Enterprise is (in my opinion) considerably more secure than PSK. Reasons WPA2-PSK has a single shared key amongst all devices. that means that if one of the devices is compromised the key is lost, so the more devices you have the risk of loss or compromise increases. As against this WPA2-Enterprise has per user secrets, so not the same problem. ...


6

I mean they cannot steal my Paypal credentials because they are encrypted, all they can do is access stuff which is not that important to me in the first place. This is a huge assumption. An attacker could use something like sslstrip to change all references of HTTPS to HTTP. It is quite common for websites to serve content via HTTP and use an ...


6

There are plenty of wireless cards to choose from in this area. The best in my opinion is the trusty old alfa AWUS036H with the rtl8187 chip-set. This card has been my favorite for a long time and is still going strong after years of persistent use. The alfa is also 'plug and play' for pretty much all Linux distros and has good drivers for windows with only ...


5

Ultimately, it's near impossible to tell with absolute certainty that nothing was installed on your system. Rootkits and such make it next to impossible to verify a system is clean after an infection which is why the adage to "nuke it from orbit" exists in the security community. That said, you seem to be paranoid about this. Why do you expect that they ...


5

WPA can be used with different protocols. Using WPA-TKIP, there are alternative attacks than the common handshake-bruteforce, but those will not grant you access to the AP. These attacks focus on RC4 weaknesses (similar to WEP, but far less effective due to successful countermeasures). I assume that you want to acces an AP. In this case, bruteforcing is the ...


5

The mechanisms applied when you "print" can be complex and depend a lot on the printer, the printer drivers and the OS. What you see as text will be translated into something that the printer can accept, and that's the role of the driver on the OS side. In any case, printers don't have infinite memory, so it is the role of some machine (in this case, yours) ...


5

No, there is no way to communicate without being jammed. You can create redundancy so that the system has several ways of communication. If the system detects that any one way is jammed it can send an alarm another way. Another possibility is to send the alarm from an external system. Your alarm system regularily contacts the external system sending a ...


5

If they track their DHCP Client IP, will I be caught? Yes. Most routers themselves list the computers connected to them in the status panel. If yes, how? By my computer name or IP address or MAC Address? The router list usually shows IPs and MACs, and sometimes computer network names (which can be found out in other ways) Of course, MACs can be ...



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