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139

No, you are just being paranoid. You were probably already connected to him over WiFi. There are many attacks he could have run this way without additional devices. Also if he would have wanted to hack you, he would not have thrown his strange hacking device in your face. He would have hidden it below the table. Side note: I feel like most of the people ...


121

Yes, you should be worried. You should contact the hotel staff, and you should not use the network any more. It is likely the router’s DNS is manipulated. It is possible that the hotel wants to make some money on the side by injecting ads. However, this script looks evil. It tries to open a dialog that tricks you into installing a trojan by displaying a ...


115

Perhaps he was using one of these wireless chargers that are built into the tables. It certainly fits your description.


84

Enforce Consequences for Students Found on the Network The first thing you need to do is ensure you have a written policy outlining what devices are allowed on the network. However, if you are not consistent in the enforcement of your policy, it is useless. This should also cover the usage policies for the Teachers, including locking their computers when ...


47

You are trying to solve the wrong problem. They are thousands and you are one. Since you are not a security expert (as far as I understand, sorry if I'm mistaken) and they aren't either but they are a horde, you are just bound to lose if you fight a conventional war. @AviD gave a great answer in a comment: Here is a non-technical idea: This is a ...


36

I don't know what that gizmo is, but unless you've got a really bizarre laptop, it wouldn't be useful for attacking your computer. Outside of a laboratory setting, attacking a computer means using its standard input or output capabilities. An ordinary wifi or Bluetooth antenna can reach your laptop from anywhere in the room; a directional antenna can ...


23

According to Whatsapp, all message traffic between the server and your phone are encrypted. The same applies for iMessage. The initial contact for iMessage is initiated via normal SMS, and does not travel through the wifi network. Therefore, it will not be possible (barring homebrew crypto security flaws) for your employer to read messages that pass ...


20

Yep. Open wireless networks are entirely unencrypted; anyone can see all the data you send (even if they aren't connected to the network).


19

If passwords are leaking like that, you may have a bigger problem than restricting Wifi access. It sounds as if the kids could do almost anything a teacher can do (including manipulate exam results?) and are routinely doing so at your location. It sounds as if a little bit of teacher education would solve this, after some detective work to narrow down the ...


17

Instead of continuing in the comments, I think I will just answer your real question, which I understand to be - why is using WPA/WPA2 Personal with a public SSID and Passphrase not more secure than having an open network, and why doesn't WPA/WPA2 Enterprise work in the coffee shop scenario. If the passphrase was public (as it would be in this scenario) ...


16

Ethernet Before I get flamed by everyone who says iPads don't have ethernet ports, this is simply a single layer of "security". In most cases teachers should be able to use their laptops with a physical ethernet BASE-100TX CAT5+ plain old physical cable. You will have reduced the attack surface area (as the keys won't be on the teacher's laptops anymore). ...


13

Without looking at the code: Yes, you should be worried! Nobody should tamper with your internet traffic, as this opens many possible threat scenarios. Even if you try to open any page and it is showing a page instead that is asking for the WiFi credentials this is impossible, as the router has first redirected your DNS query and then pretends to be the ...


13

Wireless networks work in predefined modes which have specific functionality but also come with strict functional restrictions. Wireless attacks require a higher control over the lower layers of communication in order to send and receive any kind of data. When you are in the default mode (Station Infrastructure Mode), you have to follow strict rules imposed ...


12

Consider an equipment upgrade I know you're looking for a no-budget solution, but a matching set of enterprise-grade WAPs and central controller could make securing the network easier. Weigh it against the cost of defending against a lawsuit for cyber-bullying, or harassment of an employee, or facilitating the falsification of test scores... Use MAC ...


11

As @cremefraiche said, the object fits the profile of an wireless iPod/iPhone charger. As the coil works as an antenna, it could theoretically be used to send data from the device. To investigate if this device is charger or a surveillance bug, you can try to pry it open. If the 30-pin connector has anything else than the power-lines connected, it is ...


11

Give each authorised user their own individual password. Then you'll be in a position to judge where the leaks are coming from (assuming they're being leaked as opposed to cracked). (eg You may find that need to educate one of your teaching staff not to leave the password written down on his desk). Set up harsh firewall rules that block access to most of ...


10

an open wireless connection means there is no password exchange required to connect to the network. most data used over an open wireless connection is easily observed. once connected however, there are ways to encrypt your data such as using a vpn. This would allow data to be encrypted over an open wireless connection like public hotspots. though an observer ...


10

You need to tighten human security, not technical security. WiFi password is good enough, the real questions are "Who is leaking passwords to students?" and "How to stop them?". You can't have any security if privileged persons (staff) share their credentials with the ones you're trying to block. Setting up different passwords for every single person would ...


9

Take a look at the WiFi Pineapple, which is a wireless MITM impersonization device available for $100 plus shipping. The attacker pretty much only has to power it up and configure it, and it will start offering instant MITM attacks. If a mobile device is probing for an already-known open SSID, it will happily provide it with a working internet connection. ...


9

I would use WPA2-Enterprise, so everyone would use own name and password, not just a password, which is same for everyone. To setup WPA2-Enterprise, you just need to have RADIUS server. The cheapest opinion, I think is to buy a NAS server. It supports multiple things and RADIUS sometimes too (I recommend Synology for this). Alternative is to use some ...


8

From what I've read, using https:// is safe. Is this true for networks set up for malicious purposes? If done right https is still safe. But, if you (actively) accept any kind of untrusted certificate (self-signed or signed by unknown CA) an active man-in-the-middle attack is possible. If the attacker owns a public root-CA or some intermediate CA or ...


8

In WPA/WPA2, the SSID of the network is used as a salt to the encryption. A rainbow table therefore is only useful if the SSID used to generate it is the same as the SSID of the network you are attacking. Using a common SSID increases this chance. Source


7

Although I agree with the other posters that the device in question probably was not a hack attempt, I disagree with their conclusion that he was not trying to hack you. In fact, I recommend adopting the strategy that everybody is trying to hack your equipment. That sounds paranoid, but it leads to the type of security that is more difficult (i.e. ...


6

I felt compelled to offer a less paranoid answer, having at times myself used "untrusted" networks for otherwise secure transactions. It is certainly true that a network where data is transported via plaintext is susceptible to man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks. In such a network, both the data you receive and the data you send can potentially be read and ...


6

A MAC address more-or-less* uniquely identifies a network card, and is only accessible to other devices on the local (non-routed) network. So yes, the Starbucks network can and does know your MAC address, and certainly could be sending it up into their database somewhere. Concern #1: That doesn't mean they're "recording traffic" (although, of course, they ...


6

Set up a captive portal that uses RFC 6238 like Google Authenticator (GA) (https://github.com/google/google-authenticator). GA has a PAM module. Have each employee, install the app, then come to your IT office, in person, to set up (sync) their account with the app. Use the auth token as either the only, or second factor. If the QR codes or secrets get ...


5

Yes, if you see HTTPS:// in your browser window, haven't accepted any certificate warnings and you are visiting trustworthy website like a bank, your data back and forth would remain private. If you HTTPS session were being attacked you should get a certificate warning. This might happen a) due to a fake certificate from an attacker, or b) sometimes just ...


5

What you mention is referred to as IP conflict. Most probable reason is misconfigured static settings on the other computer, nothing to worry about. Or it could be a DoS as in the router won't know where to forward the packets. In our eduroam infrastructure we automatically block these situations. Consult your University's NOC (Network Operations Centre, ...


5

Your question is devoid of about all useful information what would allow me to answer it, so I will resort to stochastically non-causal inference, also known as "guessing". I suppose that you are connecting to a WiFi access point, provided by your employer for tasks that do not include massive downloading of entertainment datasets of questionable legality. ...



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