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136

No, you are just being paranoid. You were probably already connected to him over WiFi. There are many attacks he could have run this way without additional devices. Also if he would have wanted to hack you, he would not have thrown his strange hacking device in your face. He would have hidden it below the table. Side note: I feel like most of the people ...


120

Yes, you should be worried. You should contact the hotel staff, and you should not use the network any more. It is likely the router’s DNS is manipulated. It is possible that the hotel wants to make some money on the side by injecting ads. However, this script looks evil. It tries to open a dialog that tricks you into installing a trojan by displaying a ...


115

Perhaps he was using one of these wireless chargers that are built into the tables. It certainly fits your description.


50

Yes they can but unless your neighbor has the required technical expertise, its highly doubtful. To view incoming and outgoing traffic you need specific software to monitor network packets and the tech knowledge to actually do it. Most routers only keep a syslog and unless they are using software like wireshark to monitor/capture your packets, they cannot ...


40

If you're using a machine controlled by the LAN administrator, then you have to assume they can read anything you do on it. They could have software to log your activity, they could have installed extra SSL certificates that allow them to MITM your connection to GMail. If you believe your computer has not been tampered with and is not under the control of ...


39

If you get a VPN and use that for browsing, that will hide all your traffic from both your neighbour and their ISP.


36

I don't know what that gizmo is, but unless you've got a really bizarre laptop, it wouldn't be useful for attacking your computer. Outside of a laboratory setting, attacking a computer means using its standard input or output capabilities. An ordinary wifi or Bluetooth antenna can reach your laptop from anywhere in the room; a directional antenna can ...


30

What about using tor? Keep in mind that your speed will be affected*. As other people said, using any private mode in your browser is not going to be of any help. *EDIT: The slowdown heavily depends on the network topology, the number of nodes, how much traffic the nodes are handling and what you are downloading. Here you can find some explanations about ...


25

Yes they can actually. What it boils down to is that they can see which websites you are running by looking at: Clear HTTP traffic DNS requests sent One thing you could do is purchase an encrypted VPN and run all your internet traffic through the VPN. This way your neighbours will not be able to see what you are doing.


24

To complement @David's and @Steve's answers: If the attacker ("Adam", in your case) has administrative access to your machine, then he can learn all your secrets. Installing an extra root CA, under his control, to run routine MitM interception on your SSL connections is a popular tools for honest (but nosy) sysadmins: it is a one-time installation which ...


21

MAC address filtering is a very weak form of wifi protection: the MAC addresses of your devices can be easily eavesdropped with tools like wireshark the MAC addresses of their devices can be easily changed (OS dependent, but typically an option in Network Settings). MAC address filtering is annoying to maintain. You have to login to your router ...


19

As David says, the provider of your network usually can't see data passed over https connections. However, your Gmail address is not necessarily passed only over https connections. For example, if you log into StackExchange using your secret Gmail account and visit the http (not https) version of your user profile page, then your Gmail address is sent to ...


13

Without looking at the code: Yes, you should be worried! Nobody should tamper with your internet traffic, as this opens many possible threat scenarios. Even if you try to open any page and it is showing a page instead that is asking for the WiFi credentials this is impossible, as the router has first redirected your DNS query and then pretends to be the ...


13

Wireless networks work in predefined modes which have specific functionality but also come with strict functional restrictions. Wireless attacks require a higher control over the lower layers of communication in order to send and receive any kind of data. When you are in the default mode (Station Infrastructure Mode), you have to follow strict rules imposed ...


11

When my laptop is using a network I don't control (basically anything that's not home) it wears pretty red socks to reroute all traffic into the SOCKS5 proxy built into OpenSSH and then to a server I rent anyways for my website to protect my traffic. You can use tor as well but I intensely dislike tor (for reasons off topic here). This is the socks_up ...


11

In practice, it depends on the router they're using (and, specifically, on the firmware it's running). Basically all home WiFi routers have the technical ability to log visited URLs, as long as their firmware includes such a feature (and it's not exactly a complicated one). The main questions are: whether the router firmware supports such a logging ...


11

As @cremefraiche said, the object fits the profile of an wireless iPod/iPhone charger. As the coil works as an antenna, it could theoretically be used to send data from the device. To investigate if this device is charger or a surveillance bug, you can try to pry it open. If the 30-pin connector has anything else than the power-lines connected, it is ...


11

Instead of continuing in the comments, I think I will just answer your real question, which I understand to be - why is using WPA/WPA2 Personal with a public SSID and Passphrase not more secure than having an open network, and why doesn't WPA/WPA2 Enterprise work in the coffee shop scenario. If the passphrase was public (as it would be in this scenario) ...


9

Take a look at the WiFi Pineapple, which is a wireless MITM impersonization device available for $100 plus shipping. The attacker pretty much only has to power it up and configure it, and it will start offering instant MITM attacks. If a mobile device is probing for an already-known open SSID, it will happily provide it with a working internet connection. ...


9

Hardware-wise all cards can send and receive radio packets on Wi-Fi frequencies. The problem is that the cards have a firmware that controls all the low-level stuff, like frequency-hopping, etc... for example when your computer requests to scan all available networks it doesn't manually tune the card to each frequency, listen on it and repeats the process ...


8

From what I've read, using https:// is safe. Is this true for networks set up for malicious purposes? If done right https is still safe. But, if you (actively) accept any kind of untrusted certificate (self-signed or signed by unknown CA) an active man-in-the-middle attack is possible. If the attacker owns a public root-CA or some intermediate CA or ...


8

In WPA/WPA2, the SSID of the network is used as a salt to the encryption. A rainbow table therefore is only useful if the SSID used to generate it is the same as the SSID of the network you are attacking. Using a common SSID increases this chance. Source


7

I'm an enterprise penetration tester for my company, and breaking into systems is what I do day in and day out. I'll share some of the techniques I use to perform man-in-the-middle attacks, to give you an idea of what to look for (as well as how to defend). If none of these scenarios sounds like something you encountered, then there's a significant ...


6

Using Steve Jessops idea, your provider could inject iframes or redirects in your normal http traffic, which will load your profile on stackexchange unsecured with http or any other page that does the same.


6

Yes, hidden network still send a beacon frame, just without the SSID. Your wireless hardware sends the estimated received power level to Aircrack-NG. It could be due to unsupported hardware or your hardware is not able to come up with a good power figure for the signal. Check out this forum for some older info, and look at their hardware compatibility list ...


6

I felt compelled to offer a less paranoid answer, having at times myself used "untrusted" networks for otherwise secure transactions. It is certainly true that a network where data is transported via plaintext is susceptible to man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks. In such a network, both the data you receive and the data you send can potentially be read and ...


6

Although I agree with the other posters that the device in question probably was not a hack attempt, I disagree with their conclusion that he was not trying to hack you. In fact, I recommend adopting the strategy that everybody is trying to hack your equipment. That sounds paranoid, but it leads to the type of security that is more difficult (i.e. ...


6

A MAC address more-or-less* uniquely identifies a network card, and is only accessible to other devices on the local (non-routed) network. So yes, the Starbucks network can and does know your MAC address, and certainly could be sending it up into their database somewhere. Concern #1: That doesn't mean they're "recording traffic" (although, of course, they ...


5

MAC protection isn't much protection at all since you can easily spoof your MAC address. Even if you hide your network SSID (Service Set Identifier) broadcast soon as you connect to the network using wireless and he's sniffing using tool such as AirMon-NG he would gain your SSID name for your AP (Access Point) which is passive and could attack the ...


5

Encrypt. VPN, ssl, https, etc. That's what they are for, to create secure channels within insecure environments. HTTPS is an option for 'browsing'. Always make sure you are using the https version of sites instead of the http version. There are browser plug-ins that can help with that, too. Challenge your assumption that you cannot afford VPNs, With a ...



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