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0

I think the easier way to solve this problem is to broadcast multiple SSIDs. Most SoHo routers do have support for multiple SSIDs. With multiple SSIDs, you could designate 1 for personal/family usage and 1 for guest usage. The traffic on each SSID is isolated from the other through VLAN tagging, however it would be prudent to double check as I have come ...


0

If deauth is only used to capture handshake then its no big deal that it is possible because if an attacker listens in on the com he will capture the handshake within 1 or 2 days anyway. This is why it is important to have 13 char password because that would take several billion years to crack if it was captured anyway.


0

Some wireless access points implement client separation to prevent comms between connected devices more detail here: Wireless client isolation - how does it work, and can it be bypassed? this would help to prevent the unencrypted traffic being viewed. But even with that in place if the encryption is based on a pre-shared key (PSK) and the attacker has the ...


0

Edit: Reading this post: Are WPA2 connections with a shared key secure? I realise that I know too little about the topic. Original post remains below. Does Wifi encryption create a private tunnel between the adapter and the accesspoint? No. Not even with 802.1X Authentication. -> See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.1X#Shared_media When non ...


-1

No, the privacy of clear text data does not depend on the encryption mode of the network, assuming that other (legitimate) machines are connected to the same access point. By default machines will not show (clear text data) traffic of other machines, however it is possible to do so using tools that poison the ARP table, this is called (you guessed it right) ...


2

First, a comment; sometimes (read "almost always") I get a cool new toy, app, technology and I try to fit it in in every possible place. Even in places that don't work, I enjoy figuring out why. It's a learning experience. The term "Threat Model" may sound either overly theoretical, or dismissive of your case. The purpose is for the security consultant ...


1

Having once worked at an edu, it was our goal to make things as seamless and painless for the clients (students) of the University. As a professional, there were many things that we championed for especially when it came to security. For example, we opposed P2P network, because traffic patterns at the time pointed to students downloading music (back then ...


0

As the traffic leaves the university it sets on a long long journey across the globe until it reaches the server it was meant for. During that it passes lots of countries and uses lots of people's datacenters. They all can spy on you. You need strong end-to-end (TLS) protection to be safe from those people. With encrypted WiFi you can protect from others ...


4

I think you are worrying about the wrong thing. You should have no reason to trust the local network any more than you would for any data you'd send over the public internet. If you want to send a password, it's your responsibility to ensure you're using a connection protected by TLS. Trusting the local WiFi to protect your data is essentially excluding ...


1

Short answer The main point to answer your question is that we need to know the original chopped off bit to be able to reconstruct the ICV. Only if we know that original bit, we can correct the altered packet so that it is accepted again. Longer answer AFAIK I think your assumption that Next, he/she "chops-off" the last byte of the message, right ...


1

At a bare minimum, you expose the account the service runs as. If the service is subject to attack, then that becomes a vulnerability. This is no different from exposing any other service, except that it is exposing a communications channel. The important question is, "what else on the box is using that communication channel?" You need to chase down the ...


0

In my experience the above problem occurs when you are broadcasting the deauth packets with your attacking machine's MAC and not with your router's MAC. So to solve it you should change the attacker WiFi interface's MAC address to the same as your router's MAC. (This is so because you can't change the MAC of mon0 after it has been created.) So do this: ...


2

It's looking at channel -1, try running aircrack with the following option: --ignore-negative-one or --ig as it said in the error you posted: 13:50:47 Waiting for beacon frame (BSSID: ACCESS_POINT_MAC) on channel -1 13:50:47 Couldn't determine current channel for mon0, you should either force the operation with --ignore-negative-one or apply a ...


0

Yes, this is a very, VERY bad idea. A variety of mechanisms could allow your computer to be identified, even over a wireless connection, and when they (your employer) track you down after getting nasty letters from the RIAA, you are likely to get a nasty letter in the form of a pink slip. Don't be stupid and use your work Internet for illegal activity.


5

Your question is devoid of about all useful information what would allow me to answer it, so I will resort to stochastically non-causal inference, also known as "guessing". I suppose that you are connecting to a WiFi access point, provided by your employer for tasks that do not include massive downloading of entertainment datasets of questionable legality. ...


1

Yes. The people who operate business networks log nearly everything for a variety of regulatory, security, and performance-monitoring reasons. "They" will know from their logs what IP address was assigned to you at given times. So, if anyone (like the RIAA) complains, they'll find out it was you, or at least your password. (See Tom Leek's answer about MAC ...


1

In order to act as a proper access point, your card needs to support "master"/"AP" mode. You can fake it if the card supports "monitor" mode with packet injection (in this case, your AP software will be performing many of the tasks that the driver/card would be performing in "master" mode), and you can get some of the functionality of an AP if your card ...


0

When I perform iw list I have a third option, monitor. Supported interface modes: * IBSS * managed * monitor I think this is what your IOCTL failure is stemming from. Your wireless interface needs to have a monitor mode. Try the following command (as root) to enable RFMON and I believe it will fix your problem. iwconfig [interface] ...



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