Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

If he knows the admin password to the WiFi router or network switch he can monitor every URL that you access. Many routers even come with monitoring facilities built into them to support monitoring of one's kids' internet activities. Using SSL prevents your friend form knowing the contents of what is transmitted over the pages but the sites you access are ...


1

Well it depends. If your friend is using Wireshark or similar software that allows capture the packets, then yes he will be able to intercepts the HTTP traffic in WiFi network. So put it simple: If you and your friends are browsing HTTP web pages, then "computer wizard" will be able to see what you and your friends are doing.


4

Incognito mode does not provide any protection from Wi-Fi snooping; it merely stops your browser from saving your browsing history locally. If you're using unsecured Wi-Fi (or secured Wi-Fi where the attacker knows the password), there is no way to detect if your friend has been recording your web traffic. Any http sites you visited have potential to have ...


2

Actually visiting your browser history is not possible as long as he doesn't has acces to your computer. Assuming your computer is not infected by him and he has no physical access to your computer. Although inspecting the network traffic, monitoring or saving it, is possible. What you can do is. Just ask him from man-to-man. Secondly, if you have something ...


0

It is also recommended you disable the autoconnect feature which some OS's or phones will have. if you have connected previously to an open network (i.e. McDonalds wifi, or an airport wifi) your device - if it sees the same SSID - will attempt to connect automatically. Hackers can setup a network using a laptop or such with the same SSID, and fool your ...


2

The good news is that your device will never connect by itself to previously-unknown access point. The bad news is that the concept of "previously-unknown" may not be as obvious as expected. Basically, you device will recognize and connect to an access point thanks to two things: The SSID, the "name" of the network, The pre-shared key, the password ...


0

I think you are referring to WiFi Pinneapple and Karma attacks. It's worth noting that the Pineapple can only perform this kind of attack by impersonating an open network (public wifi, coffee shop, etc.) The best way to protect yourself from an attack such as this is to 'forget' open networks as soon as you have finished using them, just remove them from ...


0

EAPOL used to create keying material instead of PSK for WEP. But after deriving key dynamically WEP password is still easyly crackable. I don't think that you can find a lot of articles about it cause it's very rare combination WEP+EAPOL I don't know any AP that supports this mode.


1

Orthogonal Spread Spectrum Waveforms are more commonly known as Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum when working in the digital domain. Directly jamming such signals is very hard. You need to use a PN sequence very close (short hamming distance) to the one used to spread the original signal. Raw power is insufficient to jam the signal. If your PN sequence is ...


2

You are assuming that the purpose of a fake AP is to collect the password of the real AP. That is incorrect. The purpose of the fake AP is to get the target's password to websites, like their email, bank, etc. You disconnect the target from the real AP, connect them to you (without password), then as they go to their websites, you "sniff" their credentials. ...


4

If they know the SSID and the password then yes they can create a rogue AP that your PC will connect to. As to the possibility of a "hack", there is a provision in Windows (and a similar feature in other OSes) to designate certain networks as trusted or untrusted. This causes the local firewall to choose looser or more strict settings, respectively. It is ...


0

It is possible to set up a wireless access point that has the same SSID ("name") like your private router. This way your PC could automatically connect to the attackers network. From this point it is easy to sniff all unencrypted data that is sent over the network. Also the attack vector for remote exploits is much greater when the attacker is in the same ...


2

WPS does not seem to be a well implemented technology. If you reverse engineer the firmware, you may find that the algorithm is MAC based, etc (such as in the case of some D-Link Routers or Belkin). It also looks like in many cases that implementation weaknesses also permit brute forcing (also see CERT VU#723755) to be done easily. This is supposedly open ...


1

While your phone is connected to the Wifi it will be subject to DHCP requests in order to maintain a connection. So while your mobile device is connected to the router it will periodically send & receive ARP packets. It is likely that it would also respond to other simple requests, such as ping from other devices, network discovery from other machines ...


0

Most programs that constantly check for updates will check in the background over wifi even if the application is not open. Applications such as facebook messenger do this often to get near realtime updates.


5

Yes. This is why it was not described as "jam-proof". However, it just so happens that transmitting powerful RF waves across the entire RF spectrum is a) very, very power intensive (like "you can't do this outside of a fixed installation near a dedicated power plant"-type power intensive), b) ruins your own systems as well, and c) makes you an excellent ...


2

This May not be the answer but it won't let me comment. Sounds like you are concerning about if unauthorized person had access to your network, and according to that you, you trying to Filter MAC Addresses If I am correct, To maybe secure your network? this won't solve your issue as Filtering is not a security feature! MAC (Media Access Control) or ...


2

An attacker with admin access to your wifi router can install a firmware "update" that contains any number of nasty things, such as a back-door for shell access or a secret password that will always allow access. Real life example: The DNSChanger trojan configured a rogue DNS server that would direct all of your advertising traffic to the DNSChanger team's ...



Top 50 recent answers are included