New answers tagged

3

It's worth noting that most IoT won't have much to phone home about. You mentioned a few devices: TV, pencil sharpener, and mouse. Unless these devices were specifically created with extra mics, cameras, etc as intentional spy devices, the information they would hold about you would be negligible. A mouse records movements on a table, and clicks. It has no ...


1

The simplified answer for home routers goes something like this: In the case of WEP it is trivial to decrypt the traffic being transmitted over the wireless network, since the WEP key is used for encryption of packets. In the case of WPA it is possible, but not as easy as WEP. WPA makes it harder by introducing a four-way handshake during the ...


1

The PSK is not 'converted' to hexadecimal but if doing the calculation by hand it is often expressed that way to simplify the process. As the manpage indicates, wpa_passphrase pre-computes PSK entries for network configuration blocks of a wpa_supplicant.conf file. An ASCII passphrase and SSID are used to generate a 256-bit PSK This means, you ...


0

I do not believe so. When the wireless card is in managed mode (the usual client mode) the card looks at the 802.11 header and passes everything else onto the kernel, so you are missing that header. In monitor mode, applications can more or less get the raw output from the wireless card, including the 802.11 header.


2

There is not so much you can do with securing wireless network from a router standpoint, but key points to hardening are:- Change default password. If available use WPA, not WEP. Disable remote administration Change the default SSID name Enable router firewall Disable SSID broadcast Enable wireless MAC filter


1

The question is whether the ISP's device and the Linksys can pair together in order to provide a single WiFi node (with the same settings and password). If they can do this then you simply need to perform the typical hardening of a device that you normally would (no external access to the admin page, change the default password, etc.)


0

Having two routers (or one router and one modem with wireless capability) gives attackers the possibility to enter your network in two ways, thus doubling the attack surface. An attacker would only have to know one of the two passwords to access your network. If you use both devices, I would advice setting the SSID and the password the same. This way, the ...


0

In order to Protect yourself, use high security encrption level like WPA2. It assing differnet Keys to each WiFi Client. How to trace: Check your router for attached devices. You can use PingTestEasy to discover devices on your network. Or can ise this method to check WiFi Clients on a network. Note down the IP address of the device. Next, you can ...


0

You can disable auto connection whenever your device sees a familiar SSID. For certain banking websites, the bank protects external users from Frauds. At minimum, have Internet security software protect your end device. Products like Kaspersky or WebRoot can protect your browser windows but I am not sure what exactly they protect... Best is to practice ...


3

As a client your basic countermeasure is to use a VPN. Since you don't have a good way to baseline anything about the multitude of Wifi access points you might have to use, your ability to spot a real one vs a Wifi Pineapple is pretty minimal. Your only hope, really, is to immediately route all traffic through a properly authenticated VPN which will resist ...


0

I have this problem. I solved it by using a WiFi media bridge to connect to the existing WiFi, connected that to a firewall, then could connect another device behind the firewall (another AP with a different password if necessary). It protects things like my file stored on my NAS and prevents users from directly connecting to my devices.. however as the ...


0

Assuming that your router's configuration management page (or port) is protected by a different password than your WiFi PSK, then yes they would need the administrative credentials to flash new firmware to the router. Simply being on the WiFi does not necessitate access to administrate it, though they would be able to brute force the login potentially (...


0

No, it is not important, here's how it works: When you're scanning a wireless network, you first find the BSSID (The AP), listen to it specifically until a client connects. I assume you know the basics. When you use aireplay-ng to disconnect, your sniffing device sends it to the AP, which in turns sends it to the station. That's why there are two different ...


0

Yes. It's possible, it will be shown in the list of detected stations, and if it's connected to an AP, the AP can be shown in the AP list, but with little information it's gathered from the packets sent from the client to the AP. Give it a try and see it for yourself. wireshark output.cap or .pcap, or .ivs file. EDIT (This is a NO) I misread the ...


2

Well, WiFi internet security is one of the major issues that the users are always complaining so I am going to share some quick tips to make your internet connection secure. In the first step you need to open your router setting page you can only do that by typing “192.168.1.1” in your browser page and then enter your user name and password which can be ...


2

If the concern is just as far as the WiFi hotspot and the users who are connected to it, then as long as you are connected to the VPN, the traffic should be encrypted and cannot be viewed by any other WiFi user. There are some concerns however, on the type of VPN used, which encryption method it is using, and so on. Also, I think the biggest concern would ...


4

It is as strong as the SSL configuration of your tunnel between your laptop, and the VPN gateway. All traffic now goes through the tunnel to the VPN gateway where it reaches out to the Internet. The VPN gateway will then ferry the response back to you.


0

The Ethernet Layer or Layer 2 is not encrypted, since it's needed in order to deliver the packets using the media access. Take a closer look at : Encrypting layers of OSI WPA2-PSK doesn't completely encrypt layer 2 information. Management frames are unencrypted (except in cases where management frame protection is implemented). As you can see, only ...


0

Deauthenticate the wifi clients with aireplay-ng (from aircrack-ng suite) or wifite. Make sure your rx quality is as good as possible. Use two adapters, and sniff with one using airodump-ng (fix the ivs_only var in airodump-ng.c and recompile) --output-format=csv,pcap or kismet. Inject with the other one. Depending on the type, you may need airmon-ng to set ...


3

If the device is enrolled on your company's network (using a device enrollment / Mobile Device Management process), they could have a lot of visibility. iOS allows for a "always-on VPN" (link). This allows for either certain or all applications to use a particular VPN connection; which could be your place of employment. With the implementation of enforced ...


2

You can be anywhere you like. Once you have the handshake you can crack the password anywhere you like. The handshake is as if you have a "hashed" password and you want to crack it. One method of doing this is using aircrack-ng which tries to crack the handshake using a dictionary attack (This is a passive attack on your captured packets). You can view the ...


25

You can't simply Force a client, but to trick him! As long as the device's WiFi is running, it keeps sending probe requests, searching for your previous connected networks. Using some software like airodump-ng, you can easily sniff out those probes. Then the attacker may create a similar evil twin using the BSSID and ESSID gathered from the previous ...


7

There are a few methods that could have been used: Devices of all sorts that use WiFi connection usually have a setting that lets the device connect automatically when the same SSID is out there. This is usually set by default and users do not usually turn it off. Hak5 generated a list of many many public WiFi SSID's (Ex: "MacDonald's free wifi") that the ...


1

Although the captive portal doesn't technically allow anything that an attacker cannot already do with a fake hotspot, it may lure users into a false sense of security. As users expect such a portal, a fake portal can be set up in addition to the fake hotspot. It's likely that users put more trust in such a connection then in just the hotspot itself (their ...


11

What you are referring to is called a captive portal. It allows WiFi providers to authorise users, get confirmation for service agreement from them, display ads, require payment for extended usage time, etc. Its existence doesn't have security implications in itself (unless it was poorly implemented and leaking user-provided information, but that is on a ...


1

Nothing can be 100% secure these days. There was a case back in 2011 where a WiFi neighbor Barry Ardolf, 46, repeatedly hacked into his next-door neighbors’ Wi-Fi network to frame them for child pornography and other horrendous misconduct. Last year in Japan, a Wi-Fi router was attacked. Generally WPA2 is considered more secure than its predecessor WEP but ...


2

"How Secure?" is a difficult question to answer. It depends on your particular circumstance and risk tolerance. If you are using WPA2 for encryption with a complex key, than I think it's reasonable to say that your connection is at least as secure as a wired Ethernet connection.


0

There are several ways of doing this. All of them are illegal (in the US at least). You can repeat traffic with a tiny bit of delay. You can make a nice device to do this out of a router and a Raspberry pi, in theory, but you should not. You can also just broadcast random noise, but echoes are worse. This is because random noise acts Gaussian, which ...


2

According to the 802.11i-2004 specification (link to download 802.11i-2004 pdf): A pass-phrase is a sequence of between 8 and 63 ASCII-encoded characters. The limit of 63 comes from the desire to distinguish between a pass-phrase and a PSK displayed as 64 hexadecimal characters.



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