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Kismac is no longer developed. Besides, macs generally do not have the wireless chipset that is capable of injecting packets. A more effective solution would be to create a linux VM (running under Fusion or your chosen VM software), investigate which chipsets are capable of injection, buy one, install the aircrack-ng suite and go from there.


1

Yes there is always the risk of some level of snooping happening on a public WiFi network like that. You could in actual fact be connected to a rouge access point that is impersonating the university WiFi. There are tools like the WiFi Pineapple and even open source projects like Snoopy that can be run on a Raspberry Pi to create these rouge access points. ...


0

If my aforementioned understanding is correct, that would mean WPA-Enterprise with PEAP is less secure than WPA-PSK because a man-in-the-middle attack is possible to intercept the passwords. This seems weird to me. Is there a flaw in my understanding? Yes, there was a flaw in my understanding. PEAP encapsulates the inner authentication method, ...


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One of the approaches can be tunnelling all the traffic through SSH. You just need to have a remote access to a trusted computer somewhere in the world (or personally yours). Tunnelling via SSH can be done from all devices such as phones, laptops, tablets which run Android, Linux or Windows. I personally prefer do this running SSH server on my home computer. ...


1

That is not what a mesh network is. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesh_networking. I think perhaps you mean a network that uses Network Address Translation (NAT). At the IP level, the mail provider does only see the external address of the router, this is true. Subsequent tracing has to be done by the administrator of the mail router. There may be ...


2

Your first priority: repression. Make sure that your security is tight and no more information is leaked. Second priority: repair. Don't try to fight the criminal yourself. Go to the police and report a crime. Most police forces have a digital forensic team that can do the things needed. Let's just hope that they have the time/resources/priority to look ...


1

It is unlikely that you are getting spam because you used a hotspot. Gmail should have their certificate pinned and their traffic should be https only, so there is no way to intercept it unless you install 3rd party certificates on the phone, or accept any warnings about invalid certificates. Spammers also do not need access to your account to send you ...


-1

You can use a public-key IPSec VPN. And, just so you know, SSL VPNs do exist!


1

It would help if you'd be more specific (information type, hardware, connectivity of hardware, OS), though I use this occasionally when sending sensitive files from phone to PC or vice versa: Encrypt file on source (I use Symmetric Key Encryption). Setup FTP server on source. Open file explorer software on your PC (Graphically, "Explorer.exe" on Windows or ...


1

Depending on your available resources you could look into encrypted short burst radio transmissions. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burst_transmission That would definitely be the most secure one-way method. With smaller means, just use regular internet connection and encrypt your file sharing. If the question were more specific, I could provide a more ...


1

This has already been asked and answered multiple times. Best answer is here: An attacker knowing the password can intercept with WEP, WPA-PSK and WPA2-PSK, but with Enterprise WPA/WPA2 + 802.1X authentication instead of PSK every client gets its own encrypted "tunnel". PSK also has the disadvantage of being a "shared secret": changing is hard, as everyone ...


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Cisco did spearhead a method of detecting these attacks and even protecting this type of attack if it is enabled and the client device supports it (minimum support of CCXv5). The Cisco feature is called "Management Frame Protection" and full details can be found on the Cisco website. In essence, the process adds a hash value to all management frames that ...


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With a minimum of two antennas it is really quick and easy to triangulated where the packets are being sent from at which point you can get out your telephoto lens and camera and get some nice high res photos of the guy, his laptop screen and high gain antenna sitting in his white van at the end of the street looking nice and smug!


1

I think there is some confusion here as to what 'BYOD' is. As far as I am aware, 'Bring Your Own Device' refers to the policies of an enterprise that allow for employees to connect to a corporate network (generally at a place of work) from their own personal devices. Many large enterprises will employ some type of MDM (mobile device management) solution in ...



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