New answers tagged

-1

best way to do so is to utilize remote syslog ability : even failed attempts are usually logged there. Linux/Unix syslog server setup is as usual as just accepting logs from your router IP, and - of course - a static IP is required for this to work without problems.


0

You could check the DHCP server in-particularly the leases. You may find MAC's and Hostnames.


0

Crunch (this provides the output for AirCrack) and then John (this turns it into a session) and that AirCrack (which cracks it). Like this: crunch 8 20 -f ~/crunch-3.6/charset.lst mixalpha-numeric-symbol14-space -i |./john --stdin (This accepts crunch's words) --session=stpcrunch --stdout (this then forwards it to aircrack) | aircrack-ng -a 2 -b ...


2

By using disassocate packets. Those packets has the source MAC of an AP and force the client to disconnect and reconnect to the AP. By keeping sending those packets, you can keep any client away and unable to connect to this specific access point. Edit: A summery for people can't access links. From a tool named Aircrack-ng Deauthentication ...


0

You should reformat the question, because your room mate seems not to have physical access to your device, instead he just captured your probably unencrypted network traffic and/or stole your sessions. At least that's the most likely scenario. Still, it's a good idea to change all your passwords used since he was eavesdropping. Also if you can not lock away ...


1

Banks do not block all VPN, but they might block known VPN which are advertised for anonymous surfing or similar. Because if such a VPN is advertised and used to hide the origin of the user then chances are high that it will be used for illegal activities too. This means an increased risk for the bank and it's users if the bank accepts orders for money ...


5

Short answer: Yes, for resonable defintions of safe. HSTS protects you against sslstrip type attacks for sites you have visited recently using a non-compromised connection (or for some browsers sites that are stored in a hardcoded "preload list"). The regular SSL CA system protects you against MITM attacks of ssl connections where the attacker has not ...


0

You were right at the beginning. This is a password for a Wifi network. It has some different properties than something for, say, your bank or your company. For one thing, you'll be entering it on a zillion different devices—many of which have terrible user interfaces. (TVs, PS4, printers, mobile phones, etc.) So if you do the usual advice and put in all ...


1

Well yes this is possible. Devices will send probes for any network currently in their wifi configuration, which for most users are all the networks they have signed on to in the past. So your home network for example is in the config of your mobile and your mobile will constantly probe that network while wifi is active. You just need to listen for the Probe ...


0

For one of the business I work with, they need to allow employee access to their network, as well as various devices that report data back to a central server. With a key rotation requirement in place, entering a wifi key into every device was pretty time consuming. One of the requirements I imposed was the key had approx 64-bits of entropy, which for a ...


1

This was suggested in a comment but isn't an answer yet for some reason. I suggest using the concept used by diceware and made popular by a certain ubiquitous XKCD comic. That is, get a word list of a few thousand words, and randomly (i.e. using dice or numbers from random.org or a high-quality PRNG) choose some words from the list. This set of words is ...


0

This greatly depends on what hardware and security you have at your office. Here are some suggestions (keep in mind that I mostly know Cisco). Port Security on the switches to make sure that multiple MAC addresses are not assigned, do some searching for wireless signals, watch utilization on specific ports/MAC addresses to see the highest usage and then ...


1

Try a passphrase (this method is also recommended by Snowden. If you do a search on youtube you'll find a few of his related videos). This method allows your password to be extremely long and very easy to remember.Example: - Create a phrase such as "thinkingoutloudonasundaymorningat110dbwith4beersinthefridge" - Swap a few characters with numbers, capitalise ...


2

If you want security with ease of use, it may be easiest to just randomly generate a long password of nothing but lowercase letters (or numbers if you are using flip phones). The basic point of password security (I'm oversimplifying here) lies in the concept of entropy which in this context means the difficulty in guessing. So what this means for you is that ...


5

Most good password advice (suggesting long passwords with characters randomly selected from a large character pool) will not ever go "out of date", except perhaps with regards to "minimum length" recommendations. (Used to be 8, then 12. Soon enough, if not already, 12 will be too short too. I recommend 15, preferably 20+.) The problem you have is one that ...


4

Because there is no encryption over the wifi connection between your device and the xfinity gateway you are vulnerable to a man in the middle attack at the least! Additionally, xfinity public wifi does not allow VPN connections which severely limit the security you could hope to give yourself. It is considered a breach of ToS as seen here. My advice is to ...


0

From the client definitely yes, an attacker can sniff packets. This is not dependent or related to the MAC address at all. The OSI model bi-furcates the physical access and makes it openly accessible, which means that this is possible. Said so, there are ways as well to bypass filtering for MAC addresses on different access points making it a little ...


2

As Julian said, the lack of HTTPS allows for man-in-the-middle attacks. He also mentioned access point spoofing, which are relatively common, especially in certain countries. What else should I be aware of? I'm of the opinion that authentication is the least of your worries. Without properly-implemented https, a man-in-the-middle attack - which can be ...


0

The lack of an encrypted WiFi connection is sadly still common and it leaves you open to man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks, Access Point spoofing/hijacking and similar attacks. Certificate warnings should never be ignored as they can be a symptom of a MITM attack. However, it could simply be that the WiFi access point is configured with either a self-signed ...


1

It's the Security parameter. From experience, if you make the rogue AP's security protocol as same as the real AP with the same key, the clients will connect to the rogue AP when the real AP shuts down.


1

Open source firmware, namely OpenWRT and dd-wrt are supposed to be more secure and "open" than the stock firmware. After all, they are based in open source. And poised to over time, having more regular updates than the stock firmware. They also have a very strong and active community. They are supposed to improve you security outlook, and you can ...


4

It's nothing to worry about, there's no reason to believe that you're compromised from just what you've stated. Addresses are assigned by the chip manufacturer (and, the bluetooth and wifi are likely on the same chip), it's most likely just easier for the manufacturer to increment by 1 for each one. The bluetooth/wifi addresses are also expected to be ...


3

Maybe you can look at their MAC address. For example, by default, VirtualBox begins theirs MAC address by 08002xxxx. The lists of couple address MAC - constructors https://support.microsoft.com/fr-fr/kb/461260


1

1) Set a strong password. Yeah, this may seem common knowledge, but I actually stick with something unique, alphanumeric, and not the default router password. 2) Hope that whoever wants into your network doesn't have something like Aircrack-ng. Aircrack is a network software suite consisting of a detector, packet sniffer, WPA/WPA-2-PSK and WEP cracker ...


4

The answer is: No it's not a good idea. There are several reasons for that. The first and most important is that the mac address of the router is broadcastet by the router multipile times every second. This is done by sending so called "beacon packets" which contain a log of information which is realted to that access point. This means the mac address can ...


10

The attacker did not seem to really try to conceal his track :he could have faked an existing MAC address for instance, or used the classical yagi antenna + high power WiFi adapter to silently intercept your communication. Instead it seems he just used a classical home grade WiFi range extender with what seems to be default settings. So it still seems very ...


2

While that could certainly be the case I recommend that you dump all of your logs files from the DHCP service (If your router has retained them) from the point you believe that your router's security was compromised and see if any unknown devices requested an address. This would certainly show that at the very least someone compromised your security and put ...


2

This is quite possible. Are there any logs on your router you can check for more information? Also, is WPS enabled on your router? If so, disable it ASAP, close all ports except for 80, change your router password (make it long and complex) and update your router firmware.



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