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0

If your phone has services listening on the personal hotspot interface (like a web interface or an SSH server - common on jailbroken iPhones and most likely rooted Android phones as well) an attacker can connect to that by bruteforcing the password and getting full control over your phone. By default though, no services should be listening on the wireless ...


2

For sites that use HTTPS, the owner of the network (the school in your case) can see what domains you visit, e.g. facebook.com, but not what you do there - what pages you visit, what Friends you poke, what password you enter, etc. Facebook, Gmail, etc. use HTTPS. For sites use HTTP instead of HTTPS, your school can see all of the above, including your ...


0

Your computer being disconnected when the other wifi shows up sounds like you're being bumped off -- which was previously achievable with WEP and (I think) still is with non-encrypted (open) networks, where an attacker could go as far as to pretend to be the router. However, if you are using WPA2 as you say your router supports, then you shouldn't have this ...


1

In theory yes it has its dangers like: Someone can "Borrow" your connection Someone can do packet sniffing All these dangers only apply for users who are connected. But since your phone doesn't have an IP for the control panel and your control panel is local and does not need access from an IP, no they could not get to your control panel. All the data ...


0

Don't worry. You are not being hacked. It is perfectly normal for your computer to detect one or more wireless networks other than your own. Mine is currently showing half-a-dozen - I live in a residential area and all my neighbours have wireless Internet too! This sounds very much as if a close neighbour has a wireless network on the same channel as ...


1

Yes but this is not an issue with the VPN protocol per se its more an issue with data leakage of traffic exiting through that connection. Specifically there are many ways in which geolocation can be done against the client via a number of protocols. In your case the most relevant one would be using client-side javascript to capture the wireless SSID and ...


2

This is happening because your AP is able to filter out the MAC address and block it after an x amount of requests. What you need to do is to change the MAC address every x requests so the router won't be able to lock you out. Use reaver mac address changer: Reaver -i mon0 -c x -b xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx -vv --mac=vv:vv:vv:vv:vv:vv Warning: This might crash your ...


7

To your fear that a local hacker is trying to compromise your internet connection and/or your computer, it's actually quite hard to "fake" an WPA2-AES protected access point: the handshake doesn't expose the key and if there were a rogue device posing as the AT&T router, the handshake would fail with an error message. So, as long as you heeded any ...


1

In creating WPA2-AES, priority was given to 1) using the passphrase to ensure that the client was authorized to use the system, and 2) ensuring that there was no way for the client to inadvertently expose the passphrase to someone posing as the host. It succeeds at these two things. It was not created with the intention of providing full secrecy between ...


49

It is unlikely a hacker stealing internet access will have the sophistication (or need) to make the wireless network change between different names. It is more likely that someone/some device nearby installed a new wireless network that happen to broadcast on the same channel as yours (there are only 3 or 4 non-overlapping ones to choose from) and have a ...


9

Here are some things you can try that may help you out. As you stated that you are not too computer savvy, I'll not be giving you any difficult instruction if I can help it. Possibly try turning off your router when not in use. This may reset your password to the default (I believe this might be printed on the device itself) If you can plug a hard line ...


2

Most places that provide free WiFi just don't care about security, and they want to make it as easy as possible for customers to connect. Since users of such open WiFi by-and-large don't care about security either, there's not much pressure for them to change that mentality. However it's not really as difficult to secure such a network as others here have ...


2

You'll need to find a secure channel to exchange the new password over. Communicating verbally would work just fine. As to an automatic notification, the only way to do this would be to flash your router with custom firmware which would allow you to write scripts to add functionality, such as DD-WRT. However, DD-WRT is unsupported on the Huawei WS319. As ...


0

Changing the SSID is for security purposes because when you change the SSID settings you can hide the SSID from discovery as well. Wifite on Kali can crack the key to my WPA2 secured AP in about 4 hours. Also some keys are out there and in wordlists that someone would use for an attack.


-1

It does not improve security at all, or in a significant way. It's cryptography/"passphrase" isn't even serious: 8 digit PIN, being the last of them a "check digit". This PIN uses a 2 stage process, where the first four digit are checked, and after those are correct, it will pass to phase 2, checking from 5th to 7th. This means that an attack will not have ...


4

You've hit it pretty hard on the head of the nail here and driven it home. It doesn't make sense. This really only matters if some sort of other filter is in place to prevent connection, and it wasn't present on this one. Even then you'd still probably have a key in place to make sure no one can snoop on plaintext. It just doesn't make sense to do this.


1

Using a VPN is good if by "hacked", you meant that the web traffic was seen by a third party. (*) However, if you meant by "hacked" that a virus was installed on the cell phone via the hotel wifi, it is different. They cell phone software might have a vulnerability, that could be well-known or not. I suggest updating to the latest version your cell phone ...


2

TKIP is vulnerable to an attack similar to the WEP "ChopChop" attack. TKIP uses MIC for guaranteeing the integrity of an encrypted frame. If more than two MIC failures are observed in a 60 second window, both the Access Point (AP) and client station shut down for 60 seconds. The newer TKIP attack uses a mechanism similar to the “chopchop” WEP attack to ...


2

As described, the disadvantage to allowing TKIP (also known as WPA) is that there is a known weakness. AES (used in WPA2) is more robust. Setting it to a mode that allows both will allow older devices that don't support WPA2 to connect in WPA mode, while devices that do support WPA2 will use that instead. Setting it to AES only comes at the price of ...


4

This problem is solved by using a VPN. Using a VPN, your data is not visible in plain-text to someone who is capturing the network traffic. Depending on how "techie" you are, you have various options. If you are not technology savvy, look for a VPN service. There are a lot out there, but product recommendation is out of the scope of stackexchange. Just ...


-1

You could use a VPN service. This will protect all data sent between your phone and the VPN service.


3

In this case, no, your device will not be subject to MITM of https traffic. It is possible for employers to deploy a root certificate to machines in order to install a MITM proxy. (BlueCoat is a company that offers such a device commercially.) However, that requires a "trusted root" certificate to be installed in the client computers. In your case, the ...


1

I assume that you are connecting from your personal device. Many companies have their own certificates on their network somewhere in order for them to check HTTPS traffic going through their network. In many countries it is legal for companies to read traffic using their equipment, and they find this necessary to protect against viruses etc. As they can't ...


2

What is this certificate being used for? A standard implementation of WPA or WPA2 in enterprise environments is to use certificate-based authentication for wireless network access. For company-owned devices, it makes connecting to a company wireless network seamless - the required certificates are automatically installed at some point (during ...


0

This is the equivalent of creating a self-signed certificate. Imagine the following, you deploy a network. Inside of this network are systems you know you deployed, and trust. You create a self-signed certificate with strong encryption. This certificate cannot be validated by yourself unless you create your own Certificate Authority (CA). What you are ...


-2

yes you will be: it seems that a MITM is planting a cert in your device. Can you show a full certificate details? What are it's permitted usage capabilities? If it would be a valid internal certificate for - let's say - an intranet web interface to something - then no external name(like dot-com as I see on your screenshot) will ever be in the cert info


-1

Your router is owned/pwned, I'm afraid. Do a strict MAC filter like "denied unless whitelisted", and - arm some NMAP's to shut the SoB down. If the ISP is not doing anything - help yourself... You have notified them


1

You might have at least a compromised device sending packets with spoofed IP addresses in your internal network. Nowadays there is already malware that will make a device assume several IP addresses, or cycle through several IP addresses, to evade blacklisting/security measures activated from the victims. I would not blacklist a particular IP address; I ...


2

The reason a computer would be listed in that section with an external IP is that the malicious device wants its traffic to look like it came from that other address. This is commonly done as part of a DDOS of other places, because the false source IP causes all of the returned traffic to head to that other address (in cases like amplification attacks this ...


1

To properly expand your thesis, you should probably read the rest of the article you posted. Under "Android and Google Service Mitigations" it explains the current posture of Google to deal with these threats. While the best solution is naturally to patch the OS at the lowest level the bug exists, it is effective enough to patch the apps in userland that ...


1

This doesn't directly answer your question (it was answered adequately above), but given your paranoia the one thing you do need to be wary of is using public terminals provided by a vendor, such as in a library, internet cafe, employer, school, etc. If they are providing you the endpoint/device, they can manipulate the certificate chain and intercept all ...


1

Disable wireless administration: Change the setting that allows administration of the router through a wireless connection to off . This means that you need to connect with a LAN cable for administration. This disables any wireless hacking into the router.


4

Generally speaking†, one cannot intercept HTTPS communications. However, a hot-spot provider can do the following: See the hostnames you want to connect to from your DNS requests See the IP addresses you connect to If you type in say http://yourbank.com, hoping for a redirect to https://yourbank.com, the hot-spot owner can intercept that and ...



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