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156

It's worth noting that your first link is in relation to the Windows Insider program. The Windows Insider program provides you with pre-release software that does call home with usage details and other information. This is something that you agree to by installing the Windows Insider preview - if you don't like it, you don't have to install it, it's ...


94

There are several reasons why Windows is so heavily inflated with anti-virus products. (I am pointing to out-of-the-box (OOTB) experiences). Windows users are, by default, local administrators, so any social engineering done on Windows can usually lead to an execution of software. Modern Linux has users set-up as low-privilege local users. It requires your ...


58

Reason may be: This Windows has implemented a strong password policy, thus the user MUST HAVE a "strong" password.


54

Microsoft Windows Pre-Release Preview (aka Windows Insiders) Privacy Statement, January 2015: (no longer applies) When you acquire, install and use the Program software and services, Microsoft collects information about your use of the software and services as well as about the devices and networks on which they operate. Examples of data we may ...


42

The reason for this tends to be historical. There is no reason why a modern desktop Linux should be particularly more resistant to malware when compared to a modern Windows desktop. However there have been many more viruses for Windows than Linux amongst desktop users, which is down to factors such as the number of users of the respective platforms and also ...


36

The main problem is probably that an IE from that era would like to support SSL 2.0, and, therefore, sends its initial message (ClientHello) in SSL 2.0 format, which has about nothing in common with the ClientHello of later protocol versions (SSL 3.0 and all TLS versions). That allowed the browser to connect to a server that knew SSL 2.0 but nothing else, ...


30

In addition to the password policy (upper case+lower case letters, number, non alphanumeric character, >8 digits), it also leads to clarity. Some users might be confused by the password being password, depending how it's displayed, especially if it's mixed with other information. Yet for all but the mentally challenged users it's immediately clear that ...


29

Password policy. You have to jump trough some hoops to get Windows to accept "password" (no capitals, no digits, no non-alphanumerics). But it will accept "Passw0rd!" right out of the box.


25

I think the most crucial factor for virus infection of desktop Windows system is, definitely, the culture and discipline of software distribution and installation. While the average Linux user opens the package manager and get the vendor-built software package (and doesn't leave the official repository to find software in 90% cases), the average (non-IT) ...


21

With a Windows Profile you can see a portion of what's been collected. Expanding on Flyk's Last point. Microsoft Updates will be turned on by default with a peer to peer model for updating over your LAN or LAN and the Internet. Cortana seems to be the main intrusion with Windows 10. Optional extra's include linking to Office 365 linking to Power BI for data ...


15

Depending on how the virtual machine is configured, the password complexity may be a requirement that's enforced by the system's security settings. On the virtual machine, run secpol.msc. Navigate to: Security Settings\Account Policies\Password Policy Observe the value for "Password must meet complexity requirements" By default, standalone systems have ...


12

There are some good answers here. I just wanted to add a couple of points. There is an historical component to the argument that Linux is less vulnerable than windows. Some of the basis for this suggestion is not as valid when referring to modern windows implementaitons as it previously was. Perhaps the biggest difference was originally due to differences ...


10

On the Windows monoculture Every working Windows malware can cause an epidemic infection. There are hundreds of millions of Win 8.1 boxes in the world and on many of them e.g. Acrobat Reader has been installed. It is a monoculture. Linux on the other hand is less a monoculture. There are many different PDF viewers: Evince, Okular, mupdf, xpdf... There are ...


8

It is technically possible to write some malware that intercepts the ISO extraction process and then writes a boot sector to the media in order to run some malware before the normal boot sequence to hinder detection. I do not know whether there are any current occurrences of this type of malware in the wild however. It is probably not worth worrying about ...


7

As the product is not opensource, one can legitimately think of the worse. But to keep the answer as objective as possible, I prefer to quote from Windows 10 feedback, diagnostics, and privacy: FAQ: As you use Windows, we collect performance and usage information that helps us identify and troubleshoot problems as well as improve our products and ...


6

There might be more reasons, I'll just list a few that came up my mind: When establishing the SSL/TLS connection (the handshake) the client sends a list of cipher suites to the server. The server's responsibility is then select the one which will be used. In case there is no suitable cipher, the connection is terminated. SNI - Server Name Indication ...


5

Is it possible that the malware on my computer can inject itself in this process/ISO? Practically, I do not remember hearing a virus infecting an ISO file. Theoretically speaking however, nothing can prevent a virus from infecting an ISO file because, after all, an ISO file is just an archived file. Regarding this fact, viruses have always infected ...


5

A fundamental problem with Windows' excuse for a security model--probably the biggest one--is that the only way a user can allow programs to do certain things that almost any installable program might need to do is to grant the program unlimited authority to do anything and everything it wants. If it were possible for Windows to say e.g. "This program would ...


5

The Electronic Frontier Foundation maintains an excellent FAQ on digital rights regarding search and seizure of computing devices. For your specific questions: (I'm going to assume US, because you reference FBI and NSA) 1. Can government agencies break disk encryption? Without a warrant or probable cause, no. With a warrant, if your question is: "Can the ...


4

Boot Camp allows you to make two operating systems coexist on the same hard drive (but in distinct areas, called "partitions"), and to choose which one is started when you power up the machine. However, each OS, once started, sees and can access the whole machine. In particular, Windows, once started, is aware of the existence of both partitions, and can ...


4

Comparing Windows and Linux is like comparing apples and oranges structurally. Configuration plays a larger role in protection than any specific OS architecture, and it goes from physical security all the way to maintenance and upkeep. All security implementations can be removed in all operating systems, and corners can be cut in terms of maintenance and ...


3

Install Opera compatible with Windows 98, I am using 10.10. Access the menu bar. Tools->Perferences => Advanced tab Select Security and then the Security Protocols... button. Popup window has check box for Enable SSL 3. Success! Google's site using HTTPS works again!


3

As the accepted answer already states, Microsoft kept the right to collect nearly everything from users of the open beta/technical preview. Keep in mind that they cannot do everything the terms of service or the free Windows 10 Technical Preview allow them to do, because especially in the EU privacy laws make some of this illegal. Before we go into ...


3

PIN numbers do not replace passwords. A password is still required. PINs allow you to have a very strong password with the convenience of being able to quickly unlock your device. PIN numbers in Windows 10 are not really included to increase the security of that specific device. In order to configure a PIN number on a device you must first log into that ...


3

You're most likely correct. Most websites now prohibit the usage of outdated SSL protocols - recall that SSL v3.0 was part of the POODLE attack, among other things! If your browser only supports the disabled protocols, then you won't be getting very far. Wikipedia has a great chart on its page about SSL/TLS, showing what protocols are supported by default ...


2

The likely cause might be that not many servers support the cypher conditions IE5 has the ability to use. At the time of your IE's release it only had SSL support and not TLS support. SSL 1.0 was never publicly released. SSL 2.0 and 3.0 have since been deprecated. Even though servers out in the wild could support them they will likely not be found on ...


2

Based on the MSRPC DCE-RPC IFIDs from the first command output you posted, the target appears potentially vulnerable to MS00-070, CVE-2000-0544, CVE-2001-0662, CVE-2002-1561, CVE-2003-0533, CVE-2003-0818, CVE-2004-0894, CVE-2005-1984 (Nessus 19406 and 19407 as well as CANVAS ms05_043 and CORE IMPACT MSRPC SPOOLSS Buffer Overflow), CVE-2005-2119, ...


2

Regarding #1, "Does the FBI/NSA or other government agencies have access to my data or can easily decrypt them?" legality aside, there are several factors to consider. "Easy" is relative. Depending on the charges, and the value of the data that is encrypted, they may have more or less incentive to break the encryption. If it's a list of neighborhood ...


2

The only reason I can think of, is the case when the password is meant to be changed and they want to indicate to the users that they should use a complex password.


2

The site you point to is a site for developer tools, and specifically VMs created for the sole purpose of testing different versions of IE. Casually released developer tools like this normally are given far less scrutiny, and are less polished than a full release of a major product. There's really no good reason why Passw0rd! is any more secure than ...



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