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2

It simply requires a entry level of electronics knowledge to do this. The average 'petty criminal' wouldn't care since they would simply sell the stolen hardware (also they most likely would not care in the slightest). Your danger would be if your average house-thief was effectively being sub-contracted by someone with a little bit more knowledge/experience ...


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/as switch to signtool.exe does that: /as - Appends this signature. If no primary signature is present, this signature is made the primary signature. See: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa387764(v=vs.85).aspx


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ARP-spoofing is a specific situation where one takes over the MAC of a known system and redirects all traffic. It provides invisibility from a functional perspective (but not at the packet level - it's very 'noisy') and is required for MitM attacks in a switched environment. But it all depends on your perspective on 'invisibility'. To be truly invisible on ...


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It certainly possible that someone will change their MAC address as part of an attack. If a system is using the MAC address for identification (e.g., Wi-Fi access), then impersonating the MAC address may allow the attacker to impersonate a real user or at least gain basic access. Additional meaures such as 802.1X, NAC, etc. should be used in such cases. ...


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If there is no option in the graphical user interface, edit GnuPG's configuration file instead. In the end, graphical user interfaces for GnuPG don't do anything else but calling the GnuPG command line. Encrypting to Others There are two options to set the used algorithms for encrypting to other people: cipher-algo [algorithm] and ...


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Updated: For Gpg4win, I see two options: For S/MIME, the GUI has a place to set it (Settings -> Configure Kleopatra -> GnuPG System -> GPG for S/MIME -> Use cipher algorithm) Otherwise, you have to alter the underlying gpg.conf file @jens-erat has already more knowledgeably described the latter, but I will offer the following inputs based on playing ...


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Putty being open-source, there have been a number of informal security audits, some resulting in vulnerability reports and patches. There may have also been some formal security audits commissioned by users of the product. Some searching revealed a bit of unverifiable evidence of such, but most importantly: Simon doesn't advertise or reference any ...


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The version of PSExec released in May 2014 - version 2.1 - closes this security gap by encrypting all communications: http://batchpatch.com/psexec-v2-1-all-network-communication-is-now-encrypted You can get the secure version here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb897553.aspx


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I see this question as an opinion-based question but here is my opinion: Unlike Linux MS Windows default behaviour is to grant administrative privileges to the user created during the installation therefore most of MS Windows home users use an administrator account for their daily tasks including browsing the web and installing programs. UAC warns the ...


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UAC is, in my opinion, too highly praised. True, it does protect against the more simplistic admin-requiring malware installation scenarios which were more prevalent before its advent, but it created new such scenarios, which are not much better. In short, all that UAC changed is the following. Before it came to be, malware authors could make malware that ...


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A few things: You might be interested in this link: - seems PCI compliance scanners get confused about these issues sometimes. Technically Beast applies to Browsers, but CBC is not what you want for your ciphers anyway. However, CBC mode is default for FIPS complient RDP anyway :( Yes, you definitely want TLS. Without some more specific information ...


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When creating Windows 7 firewall rules for Tor, creating rules for the unzip'd Tor software on your desktop may not work. This is because the Windows firewall doesn't work well with pathnames such as "%APPDATA%", etc, that end up in the pathname for rules when allowing the tor.exe client. So if you've got Tor unzip'd on your desktop and "any any" rules for ...


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Since Windows Vista and Windows 7, Windows has an automatic procedure of downloading new root certificates. So for example if you connect to https://www.hongkongpost.gov.hk/index.html and Windows does not (yet) have the root certificate, the root will be downloaded from Microsoft if Microsoft thinks the root can be trusted. So to answer your question, it's ...


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To answer number 3: It is in my list of trusted root certificates (windows 8.1) Windows uses these settings you are looking at, and some browser have their own list, others depend on the windows list of trusted roots. Chrome seems to use the OS: http://www.chromium.org/Home/chromium-security/root-ca-policy Firefox has it's own list: ...


4

The signature is of a hash of the portion of the executable before the code signing block. Best practice is to have both the installer and the application signed. You can study some details by looking at this: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/gg463180.aspx EDIT: OK, now that I'm off the mobile device and on a real keyboard, I can ...


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There is a difference between the certificate signature and the signature made with the certificate. The former, which is valid, means that the Certificate Authority says the certificate you have is a legit certificate they have controlled, and the CA signature integrity allows you to check the certificate has not been tampered with. Therefore if you trust ...


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You're either behind a malicious proxy/VPN or your host file is effected. Most likely the latter. On windows 8 you can check your hosts file here C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\hosts Remove any lines with strange IPs. Infact you can remove everything if you aren't running any cracked software or have routes setup for a web server. This could also be ...


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The long way: Nmap the net. for topology, focus on red nodes for access to network using the port of your choice that is both open, associated with the red Nmap node and uses UDP. Migrate sideways once in to a node the Nmap showed as yellow (not required). Now that you are nested in the network, escalate privilege but don't become admin. you should be ...


2

Possible intrusion methods to achieve this could be a hard reset of the computer, change boot priority, and insert media with code capable of bypassing login credential requirements. (Hiren's boot CD or F4UCD for Win7 and earlier versions can do this). Without restarting the computer, as GZBK said, if autoplay or autorun is enabled, then a USB may be ...


3

Unfortunately, MAC addresses are not (usually) routed over the internet. So unless you have a cached information on your network (internet router, appliance, internal service) or on a paper (original NIC/laptop boxes, ...) you can't find it. To track your laptop, if you don't have any specific service installed on it for this purpose, you can try to ...


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Why won't MAC tracking work? Although MAC addresses ought to be unique, there is no convenient way of tracking a MAC address. You would need to have access to lower-level network layers to find out if a device with a specific MAC address is currently connected to a Gateway/Router/etc. Higher Layers such as IP, TCP/UDP don't include references to the MAC ...


0

Android essentials does when installing applications. Each app gets a group assigned to it, and only that group can access the data for the app. In a Unix based system this is rather simple to implement. Windows gets a bit harder. Access Control Lists What you can do is create a custom Discretionary Access Control List (DACL) for your application. ...


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Sniff for TCP or UDP 88 (Kerberos), amongst others Or if you have an account on the domain (just in case), from the command prompt run nltest /dclist:yourdomain.com


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Applications on Windows Operating Systems run in the context of the user executing it and therefore inherit the ACL of that user. When looked at abstractly your program is doing nothing more than Word (winword.exe) or Excel (excel.exe) is doing with .doc or .xls files. You shouldn't need to restrict access of the data to only the application, risk reduction ...


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On Unix, I would suggest that you run that application as a particular user or group and limit the permissions on that folder to the user and group. You could do the same on Windows, but not as easily. If you know all of the users who will run the application, can you add them to a particular group, then give the group full control over that file?


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It looks like user-level passwords in this scenario will be of limited benefit to login to AD-controlled assets. The one thing that might be beneficial is the possibility of re-used passwords for other assets. You haven't given a lot of detail, but if you can connect to the mail system, you can set up social engineering attacks, or look through user's mail ...



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