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0

Can you explain exactly how the other browsers fall back? I've seen the following scenarios with servers and middleboxes: try to connect with TLS 1.0 or higher, peer responds with SSLv3 and thus the connection continues with SSLv3. This usually succeeds. try to connect with TLS 1.0 or higher, peer closes connection and browser tries again with lower TLS ...


1

If a machine is hijack by an hostile entity, then the attacker can gain full access to the hardware -- including every drive which is currently plugged in the machine. If the Linux drives are encrypted with a key that the Windows system never sees (which means that if you want to copy files from the Linux to the Windows, you have to do it from Linux, not ...


0

So the quick answer to the jest of your question is yes, having multiple OS's partitioned separately is technically safer. However, you are not immune by any means! There are countless attacks and viruses/malware aimed at the firmware/bios/etc of the computer itself -well beyond/before your OS starts up. Additionally, even with FDE (full disk encryption) ...


0

Are you developing this software? I would just generate a unique token stored in database such as: TokenId UserId (Or some entity which this token relates to.) TokenKey (Which will be used as an identify to the public.) IsExpired Ip (Which is hashed such as SHA512 so doesn't expose the users IP if compromised.) CreatedOn UsedOn Now, we need reduce ...


-2

There is a security flaw with the Picture Password. After switching your login method to Picture Password, Windows 8 will then store your Picture password as well as your regular user password using the reversible encryption algorithms. Using the freeware Mimikatz and you can decrypt the Picture Password in no time.


1

As long as the pc is connected to the Internet (or any network for that matter) an antivirus and a firewall is a must. If you don't browse the net from windows then a free antivirus should be enough. Still, you should have one installed.


1

If your PC is going to be online at any point (which in all likelihood it will be) then it is recommended to use virus protection. There is plenty of free and light software that will be sufficient. For installation and continuous scanning, try Microsoft Security Essentials


4

When you are going to play games you downloaded from the internet, you should definitely get a virus scanner. This is especially a concern when you download pirated copies, because these are bundled with malware from time to time. But even when you stick to legal downloads there is a certain risk involved. There were cases of renowned download portals ...


1

If you don't browse, and if you get your games from official places, you can skip the antivirus. If you browse, or if you get your games through illegal download, then it has to be considered like a traditional PC and protected appropriately, from OS to browser level. If you don't use an antivirus, at least the Microsoft Security Essentials and things like ...


0

In windows you can replace 'utilman.exe' with 'cmd.exe' using a windows installer media. Boot into repair mode and open up a command prompt, CD into C:\, go to system32, backup the exe's and replace utilman with cmd. Restart your computer, click the "ease of access" button down in the left corner, suddenly, a wild CMD prompt appears with admin rights. Now ...


0

I have not verified that, but the obvious way on windows would be to use CryptProtectData with CRYPTPROTECT_LOCAL_MACHINE. At least that is the way passwords are stored in SQL Server Management Studio... reversable... ;-)


1

I like keeping this simple. If the webserver runs OpenSSL 1.0.1 through 1.0.1f and accepts SSL connections, it will most likely be vulnerable. As Steven says, this is SSL/TLS protocol wich is transport layer security. This exploit is not on the application layer of the OSI layer. Have a look at heartbleed.com for detailed information about the exploit.


0

If you're hosting the web site in Internet Information Services (IIS), you won't be affected because IIS doesn't use OpenSSL to support the SSL/TLS protocol. See Vulnerability Note VU#720951 for reference. Not sure what SSL/TLS implementation Apache for Windows uses, though. Chances are it does use OpenSSL, in which case you'll want to apply a security ...


1

Yes, long as the user of the computer gains appropriate access to write to memory of your capturing software. The attacker could use API hooking to spoof the screenshot. http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/30140/API-Hooking-with-MS-Detours Just same method used in malware and gamehacking. You'll want to ensure the user doesn't gain administrator rights and ...


0

Yes, that sounds quite spoofable. Take some screenshots of usual activity at the appropriate delay, then have something display the next one every time a screenshot is taken. Apart from that, it depends on the privileges the user has, and on what you mean by “suspicious activity”. A USB stick preloaded with anything and masquerading as some document, for ...


0

Run the connect version of Windows, trace your code with a debugger. Analyse the exploit. BinDiff the patch and have patience.


1

If you're asking if a user could display an arbitrary screen, then yes. Any software that can display a full-screen image (ie: display an image not in a window, but that displays over the full real-estate of the screen) is capable of spoofing your system. Most photo editing software can do this, as can pretty much any video playback software, or even web ...


-2

Ubuntu is the most secure operating system in the world, check out this link http://www.technology91.com/ubuntu-12-04-lts-tops-gchq-security-report-over-windows-and-mac/


0

Yes, it is possible for an attacker to gain access to your private and sensitive data during encryption or decryption. This attack is known as memory sniffing attack. In my opinion this is very sophisticated attack. The attacker dump the machine memory (e.g. RAM, swap files, etc) and then analyze this data to retrieve sensitive data (e.g., password, ...


1

Collisions are irrelevant to most usages of hash functions in conjunction with passwords. For password hashing, preimage resistance is important, not collision resistance. MD5's resistance to preimages is (almost) as good as new. MD5 for password storage would be a poor choice "alone", though, because password hashing requires salts and slowness, both ...


1

Using some type of network montor, network tap, ping sweep, or other traffic monitoring tool.. No, capturing traffic is generally silet unless the attacker is trying to make noise and capture the traffic. There are sys admin tools which can monitor installed programs on authorized machines, and you can use network access control to limit unauthorized ...


0

You can always look for those Wifi and Ethernet cards which are in promiscuous mode as these shouldn't be so. If you deploy a good AV like sophos you can block all USB ports and CD drives. Lock down privileges to certain things such as CMD, Run and maybe C:. If you deploy a proxy you can filter the undesired website into a blacklist so the user cannot reach ...


3

There is no way to do that unless you can monitor the installed programs on your users´ PCs with a software like EMCO Software scanner.


2

Although running Google chrome on top of Windows XP seems secure but the reason it isn't is that exploiting vulnerabilities on Windows XP is easy (many orders of magnitude) compared to Windows 7. Windows XP is lacking common memory corruption protections such as DEP and ASLR. This means that a vulnerability that might be just a denial of service for the ...


3

It's a risk. XP has had enough holes over the years that it's hard to imagine there aren't some un-found holes in what remains. I'd recommend getting off XP if possible. If not, at least keep your ear to the ground. If a researcher finds more vulnerabilities that Microsoft is now unwilling to fix, you can bet they're going to hit the tech news media. ...


2

Bitlocker with Active Directory integration is probably best for Windows Server 2012. Your primary problem with FDE on servers is the requirement for boot time passwords with things like Becrypt, TrueCrypt, PGP. Boot time passwords generate extra work for your network ops. Encrypting inside the VM is usually unnecessary. What are you defending against? ...


1

There is a Linux version of Skype however, I wouldn't recommend running it on bare metal. Have you considered running a virtual machine on your main Linux system (either Windows or Linux) and running Skype inside that? This way the software inside the virtual machine cannot access the ram of the host. I assume that in such a case the RAM is still ...


3

...because what's going on is that you're compromising your own system. If you read the Old/New Thing blog, the author calls it "being on the other side of an airtight hatchway". It's like asking what's preventing people from entering your house - all your friends would ask "yes, but you lock your doors, don't you?"; you can "break into" your own house ...


2

From the Wikipedia page: A 2007 paper from Hebrew University suggested security problems in the Windows 2000 implementation of CryptGenRandom (assuming the attacker has control of the machine). Microsoft later acknowledged that the same problems exist in Windows XP, but not in Vista. Microsoft released a fix for the bug with Windows XP Service Pack 3 in ...


1

Password Reset Key seems to contain a modified Windows PE OS. I think it is something similar to PCUnlocker Live CD/USB drive. It's not a completely new thing. There are many freeware such as Rufus, ISO2Disc which allows you install a Windows OS on a USB drive.


-1

Kernel security measures. I don't know a lot about the memory security model of Windows, because I don't use Windows and am not interested in it, but I would bet you anything that there are parts of memory that you are not allowed to modify, no matter what. Ever. Even as the administrator. Why? Here are three reasons I can think of off the top of my head: ...


0

Nothing. The only problem you may encounter is getting the execution or the download. But that can be trivial at times.


3

Because mythical imagined malware that might subtly modify your unique proprietary source code is very unlikely to exist, there are a couple of slightly more real threats you could check for. If your friend's computer was compromised by a human hacker, the hacker could have copied your code to his computer, studied it, changed it, and uploaded his changes ...


0

Since these are .java / text files, all changes are visible; there is no decompression/unpacking/reversing required here. Since you use Git, my best suggestion would be to see the changes done form your previous commit and the last one. You can see all the changes done to the file and make sure there is nothing malicious code added to it. Git has a ...


2

The only way that I'm aware of for you to prove this "beyond any doubt" would be to have your client audit the servers themselves, or to have them audited by a 3rd party (e.g. consultant) that you both trust to do the work. Network scanning isn't likely to be sufficient on it's own as that wouldn't cover disabling services or the possibility that a firewall ...


2

Do a full scan of the target machine's IP address with Nmap from LAN or Internet: nmap -p- 12.34.56.78 If you've closed all the unused ports, then you'll see that in the scan result. Edit: It would look like this: Starting Nmap 6.40 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2014-03-29 11:26 CET Nmap scan report for abc.com (12.34.56.78) Host is up (0.030s latency). Not ...


1

what about running virtualbox on your windows machine, and in a new virtual machine you run something more secure like debian linux, and run apache web server on that ? then you can use the iptables on linux and the general security that comes with linux. or simply install linux directly on the host. I am sorry but if you want a secure system, running a ...


1

Right now my main concern is privacy, so I may ignore advice on other security issues. You are exposing at the very least your IP address, which can be mapped to a specific location, so that sounds like minus points for privacy. The firewall's purpose is to limit access to services. It does not prevent "bad" traffic on port 80 which then installs ...


4

It isn't a game of magic ports used by hackers. If there isn't a service running on the port, it's unlikely in the extreme to result in a compromise, but it's nonetheless a good idea to use a strong firewall, especially on windows where lots and lots of services are running by default. That said, if someone is going to compromise your web server, they will ...


3

Obviously allowing users to upload any file types is very dangerous Anything a user uploads is just 0s and 1s until you actually decide to do something with it. Executing such files would be a bad idea, yes. Executable programs don't automatically run unless you tell them to, though. If you are wondering about the autorun behavior of certain storage ...


-1

No it's not broken. No fix is required as the 'fix' is in (so to speak) with later versions of Bluetooth. But that's also the problem and the criticism. Just like a password is only as good as who knows your password, Bluetooth is only as good as the implementation that you're using. You're right... it very handy and that very handiness is what makes ...


0

Over the years, Microsoft has done a lot to make it harder to exploit Outlook out of the box, however, any system that processes data from untrusted sources is open to being exploited. There are many potential vectors for this, particularly if you grab additional content for messages beyond the basic text. It's impossible to guarantee you computer couldn't ...


2

Malware in an email can theoretically compromise your system even if you don't open it. Every mail that comes in is processed to some degree, and vulnerabilities in the email program could be used my embedded malware. This has happened in the past IIRC, several years ago, and I believe it had to do with image processing. Currently there are no published ...


4

The dangers are the same with logging in as root in any system. Suppose a malware has found a way to bypass UAC, what can it do? If you're logged in as administrator/root pretty much everything it could ever want to do can be done. On the other hand if you're logged in with a normal user all it can do is corrupt/infect the users files in the users home and ...


0

Your observation is correct, there are several ways someone can access your files if they are in possession of your machine, even if they do not know your Windows login password. If you are worried about the integrity of your data in the event of a theft then consider deploying full disk encryption. This will require you to input an extra password when you ...


1

Although windows can be installed on top of another copy, this is not required to break into it. A simple password removal tool, like "Offline NT Password and Registry editor" will do the job. I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "security applications". Lojack for laptops? That can reinstall itself even if you format, on supported laptop models.



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