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91

Enforce Consequences for Students Found on the Network The first thing you need to do is ensure you have a written policy outlining what devices are allowed on the network. However, if you are not consistent in the enforcement of your policy, it is useless. This should also cover the usage policies for the Teachers, including locking their computers when ...


79

Overview First, I learned a lot of my information from a combination of my amateur radio experience and an awesome talk I sat in at DEFCON 18. The majority of satellite systems are simple repeaters. The signal that comes in on a transponder is cleaned, amplified, and retransmitted. If you know the location and input frequency, and you pump more effective ...


58

From a layman point, Yes its a design flaw and yes the signals are boosted to unlock the cars from far far away. This is knows as Relay Station Attack(RSA). Some of the ways to mitigate such attacks are: measuring Group delay time to detect illegal high values measuring Third-order intercept point to detect illegal Intermodulation products measuring Field ...


52

You are trying to solve the wrong problem. They are thousands and you are one. Since you are not a security expert (as far as I understand, sorry if I'm mistaken) and they aren't either but they are a horde, you are just bound to lose if you fight a conventional war. @AviD gave a great answer in a comment: Here is a non-technical idea: This is a school,...


50

I have a car with such a keyless entry system. My dad saw a report about those ADAC findings on TV and he had an idea which works: By placing the key in a steel can like the one above, the car does not detect the key any longer, so I figure range extenders would not pick up the key's signal either. Of course, this is annoying as it defeats the whole ...


43

Fairly easy to be honest, all you need is to do is listen for Probe Requests. There is a nice blog explaining how to go about setting up a computer with BT5 to listen for them here. With a networking card that supports "Monitor mode", you are able to pick up so called "Probe requests". Once the networking card is set up to be in monitor mode you can use ...


41

First of all that would entirely depend on the encryption used by the access point. There are several types of possible encryption. Mostly on consumer wireless access points these are: WEP WPA WPA2 WPS WEP Let's first dive into WEP. WEP was the first algorithm used to secure wireless access points. Unfortunately it was discovered that WEP had some ...


37

They're both evil. You shouldn't be connecting to any "Free Public Wifi" without assuming that all your unencrypted traffic will be monitored and modified. The best solution is to not connect to public networks at all, but if that's not an option for you then you can protect yourself a little more by specifying your own DNS (rather than letting the router ...


35

More details here. High-end manufacturers use expensive challenge-response schemes (the key sends a request, the car answers with a challenge, and the key sends a reply derived from the challenge with some algorithm). Even so, such algorithms are proprietary, usually not reviewed, and could well be an example of "rolling your own crypto". There are ...


32

From a security perspective, I think you are asking the wrong question. WPA2 is the basic answer. But it's entirely incomplete! A more complete answer will view WPA2 as one component of your wireless network defence. Of course there's strong encryption methods using certificates/vpn etc but these are too difficult for most people to set up and are usually ...


31

If someone knows my wifi password (be it WEP or WPA) what can they see on my screen? Do they just see URLs I visit, or can they see everything in my browser,....or can they see everything I do on my computer? Does using HTTPS make any difference? They can't see anything on your screen (unless you've enabled some sort of unencrypted remote desktop screen ...


30

Monitor mode: Sniffing the packets in the air without connecting (associating) with any access point. Think of it like listening to people's conversations while you walk down the street. Promiscuous mode: Sniffing the packets after connecting to an access point. This is possible because the wireless-enabled devices send the data in the air but only "mark" ...


25

In a nutshell, WPA2 is currently the most secure wireless security scheme. Personal and Enterprise It supports two main modes of authentication, known as WPA2-Personal and WPA2-Enterprise. The former utilises a pre-shared key (PSK) and is generally considered to be most suitable for home networks, whereas the latter is 802.1x which requires an ...


25

Instead of continuing in the comments, I think I will just answer your real question, which I understand to be - why is using WPA/WPA2 Personal with a public SSID and Passphrase not more secure than having an open network, and why doesn't WPA/WPA2 Enterprise work in the coffee shop scenario. If the passphrase was public (as it would be in this scenario) ...


22

What would be required to hack a satellite (in general terms, any hack really)? When it comes to satellites, the word general does not apply. Almost every satellite, with very few exceptions is custom. Even the currently orbiting GPS satellites are not all the same: there are GPS IIA, GPS IIR, GPS IIR-M, and GPS IIF. I would venture that even satellites of ...


21

Traditionally there hasnt been an easy user-oriented method to detect evil twin attacks. Most attempts to detect an evil twin attack (ETA) are geared towards the administrator of a network where they basically have the authorised network admins scanning and comparing wireless traffic. This isnt so much of what you are interested in. There is a paper here (...


20

Tell the barrista/clerk/etc the wifi has gone down, can they reboot the router. Most people will happily do so, bringing the AP down for a moment, and exposing the evil twin router in the process as any active network that survives a power cycle. If there is more than 1 evil twin router, this still works. If there are multiple good routers, this would ...


20

If passwords are leaking like that, you may have a bigger problem than restricting Wifi access. It sounds as if the kids could do almost anything a teacher can do (including manipulate exam results?) and are routinely doing so at your location. It sounds as if a little bit of teacher education would solve this, after some detective work to narrow down the ...


20

If you truly fear an RFID proximity relay attack, such that you would keep the key fob in a Faraday cage in your pocket, you must recognize that you will be giving up all the convenience of proximity, plus other inconveniences. You'll have to carry some kind of larger container, and you'll have to open it to take out the key to use the remote or the key. I ...


19

Ethernet Before I get flamed by everyone who says iPads don't have ethernet ports, this is simply a single layer of "security". In most cases teachers should be able to use their laptops with a physical ethernet BASE-100TX CAT5+ plain old physical cable. You will have reduced the attack surface area (as the keys won't be on the teacher's laptops anymore). ...


16

Yes, this is possible. It is not an easy task, though, and you are not likely to be a target. There are series of equipment which are shielded so that such attempts are more difficult. They follow sets of standards called TEMPEST.


15

Hacking a television station is hard. Most of the broadcast infrastructure isn't connected to the Internet, making outside intrusion difficult or impossible. Let's say you want to hack your local news station. Problem #1 is that their equipment isn't connected to the Internet -- it's quite possible that they're still using a bank of Betamax machines for ...


14

From testing, I have demonstrated to clients that yes, both of these are possible. The machines are supposed to have a 1 to 1 relationship with the mouse, but for some types of mouse there aren't a lot of ID codes, so you can get overlap. The same is true for some wireless keyboards. Simplest solution: if you are worried at all, use wired devices


14

Not alone like a WPA/2 PSK attack, where you can simply capture the handshake and bruteforce. You'll need to capture the "Enterprise" authentication attempt. To do this, you can perform an "Evil Twin" attack that captures the authentication attempt, which can then be subsequently cracked. Here's an excellent presentation by Matt Neely of SecureState that ...


14

There is one thing an evil twin can't copy: location. Set up three computers, then triangulate it. Or have some sort of time detector. If one of them is responding fast enough that you know, according to the speed of light, they must be within the store, then you know that it will be in the store, which is helpful if delays make triangulation harder. Note: ...


14

When you use Tor, all data is encrypted between your computer and the exit node. As long as the exit node isn't on the same network that you are on (very, very unlikely to occur), the data will be protected from the local network. Note that meta data such as the fact that you're using Tor and rough estimates of how much data you are communicating may be ...


13

The key here is what you define as "every day use" - if you work in an environment where the data is sensitive, your security policy should take into account the risk from wireless interception and if appropriate, the use of wireless devices should be forbidden. Faraday cage equivalents, such as shielded rooms/buildings may be appropriate but are obviously ...


13

If your WiFi router is hijacked (which is a bit more thorough than simply obtaining your WiFi password), then the attackers will be able to see every byte which leaves your computer or enters it. Your computer, by itself, ought to be safe. Theoretically, safe Web browsing is still possible thanks to SSL. In practice, however, this means that the attackers ...


13

@ewanm89 is entirely correct. Securing the connection between ground control and a plane should be no different from securing any regular connection. The main issue is that the protocol designers are relying on security by obscurity. Obscurity through the relatively unknown protocol being used. Obscurity through what used to be relatively difficult to ...


13

Promiscuous Mode: Capture packets on a network that you have connected to. This is likely what you need to be in if you want to analyze packets (Wireshark, tcpdump, etc.) Monitor Mode: Capture packets regardless of connected network. No association to AP needed (and no authentication). Because it is not connected to a network, you can't process the ...



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