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5

A wireless network that is unprotected means that anyone can simply connect to your wireless access point, and collect all of your traffic. If users of the network aren't using HTTPS (SSL/TLS enabled) webpages then their passwords, usernames, and any other sensitive information would be unprotected. Using WPA2-PSK, the wireless access point uses the ...


4

If you don't have permission, breaking into someone else's network is illegal regardless of why you're doing so. If you really want to learn about the security vulnerabilities of WPA-PSK and WEP, I recommend setting up your own AP and practice breaking into it.


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Your understanding is already pretty good. As you say, there are a variety of EAP protocols: LEAP, PEAP, EAP-FAST, EAP-TLS, etc. Each one works differently, but they all do the same thing: authenticate a user before allowing them access to a wireless network. You could call EAP a protocol, or you could call it a framework of protocols, where each variant ...


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My understanding of NFC is that, as a standard, it doesn't offer any provision for encryption of data security. This means you'll have to implement security on top of it. So first: the important part: do not try to implement it yourself: You do not have the understanding necessary to design it properly (as demonstrated by your question) Even with proper ...


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crunch 10 10 0123456789 -t 760%%%%%%% | aircrack-ng ........... where 760 are the first three characters and the percents are any possible number. Meaning % stands for any number after 760 for lower-case letters replace % with @ for upper-case letters replace % with ' for symbols replace % with ^


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The only identifying information that the card sends is the MAC address. However, other parts of your system can send identifying information as well. For example, the DHCP client may send your computer's name to the DHCP server; if you browse the web, you can be identified through browser fingerprinting.


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Yes. Pretty straight forward information provided by each wireless access point. For instance in Android, this is what this information looks like in Wifi Analyzer: Only the security types listed for an access point will be accepted.


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Yes, ofcourse that is possible! Almost any device that can wirelessly connect using WiFi, also has an interface for connecting to it right? I'm pretty sure that almost ALL devices, when prompted for a password say something like: "This network is using WPA2 Protection, please enter your password" or: "This network is useng an Enterprise Security, ...


1

So I hope I do not make myself look like a idiot but I will try to help explain this from my understanding of it. I should note, this is not my full time job so please be kind if I have something really off:) These protocols, and I believe eap is a protocol, peap is protected eap, so it is probably the same protocol with additional encryption, are used to ...


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In the scenario you have outlined it is in fact possible, at least in theory, to sniff the connection. Okay, so WEP is easy to crack, and if you are using, you should stop and get on to WPA2, which is far more secure, and nearly impossible to break. In each of these cases you will need to have some sort of password/key set up. If it's just your own access ...


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At least the block where the attacker does the modification, its information will not be recoverable (you'll recover senseless info, be careful on that also because it may have sense even!), but depending on the block cipher mode it could disturb your decryption in a longer set. No information is released on that, but how you react to this issue may release ...


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In term of risk, enabling isolation can only be an improvement if you start with an open router without any kind of protection. Isolation should protect you from DNS poisoning (like the example you wrote) but also from ARP poisoning (see: http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.2172).



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