Hot answers tagged

58

From a layman point, Yes its a design flaw and yes the signals are boosted to unlock the cars from far far away. This is knows as Relay Station Attack(RSA). Some of the ways to mitigate such attacks are: measuring Group delay time to detect illegal high values measuring Third-order intercept point to detect illegal Intermodulation products measuring Field ...


50

I have a car with such a keyless entry system. My dad saw a report about those ADAC findings on TV and he had an idea which works: By placing the key in a steel can like the one above, the car does not detect the key any longer, so I figure range extenders would not pick up the key's signal either. Of course, this is annoying as it defeats the whole ...


20

If you truly fear an RFID proximity relay attack, such that you would keep the key fob in a Faraday cage in your pocket, you must recognize that you will be giving up all the convenience of proximity, plus other inconveniences. You'll have to carry some kind of larger container, and you'll have to open it to take out the key to use the remote or the key. I ...


16

Yes, this is possible. It is not an easy task, though, and you are not likely to be a target. There are series of equipment which are shielded so that such attempts are more difficult. They follow sets of standards called TEMPEST.


14

When you use Tor, all data is encrypted between your computer and the exit node. As long as the exit node isn't on the same network that you are on (very, very unlikely to occur), the data will be protected from the local network. Note that meta data such as the fact that you're using Tor and rough estimates of how much data you are communicating may be ...


11

You could use a Faraday cage to create a physical security layer. By having a box with a built in cage to the correct specifications where the keys are stored, you remove the potential for this attack to work. Keyless entry systems have many more avenues of attack however, so if you're seriously concerned about vehicle security you may wish to store it in a ...


10

First of all, a cracker is considered somebody that reverse engineers software in a way where copy protections or nags screens are removed. From Wikipedia: Software cracking (known as "breaking" in the 1980s1) is the modification of software to remove or disable features which are considered undesirable by the person cracking the software, especially ...


7

The focus of Tor is not privacy, but anonymity. When you use Tor, your traffic is protected under multiple layers of encryption as it bounces between relay nodes, before it finally reaches and is decrypted by the exit node. The exit node finally sends your traffic to the intended destination and the reply back to you through the Tor network. This setup has ...


6

If the attacker is sufficiently close to the access point and can connect to it, he can view all unencrypted network traffic that goes past your router by using a packet capture utility like Wireshark. Although WEP adds a slight barrier, its still easily decipherable even by unauthenticated users. On a side note: WEP has been shown to be completely broken. ...


5

NFC is just another medium like wires, wifi, microwave, light-comms, etc. It will be incumbent on the security professionals to create and guide their safe use whether it is for payments, data sharing or any other purpose. Being an invisible medium probably brings its own risks in terms of awareness, but there is nothing intrinsic beyond its invisibility ...


5

If the encryption to the banks web site is encrypted end-to-end with TLS they cannot sniff the secret. But The attacker could use tools like sslstrip to downgrade you to plain text. If you are not aware about you might not notice. There are ways for the bank to enforce HTTPS like with using HSTS, but it is not supported by all browsers and not all banks ...


5

If the connection is unencrypted then you can sniff the video and watch it, real time if you have the tools and have visibility of the connection (typically by being on the target's network, but not necessarily) You won't necessarily know when they stop and start the video, as most video services buffer the stream (ie they download ahead of where you are ...


5

What you are trying to do is called "carving" a file in the forensic world. I know there are plenty of off the shelf tools that can pull out images and display them in a browser in real time, so it should be possible to do this with video. It may be more complicated to do a video in real time though do to file access restrictions (one process reading while ...


5

Here's a reasonable metaphor (I think). Imagine you're going to deliver a message to someone and you're gonna mail it on a postcard. That is, anyone who can get their hands on the postcard can read your message. Now, you pick 3 random citizens to help you—A, B, and C. You put C's address on an envelope and you put the postcard inside. Then you put B's ...


5

Pixie works by exploiting weaknesses in the generation of the E-S1 and E-S2 nonces which are used to produce the enrollee hash, as described in the Pixie Dust Attack. Traditional attacks attack the two halves of the WPS PIN (PSK1, PSK2) in an online attack, essentially brute-forcing all possible options for the PIN until it is found. This has to be done ...


4

A closed binary is harder to audit than something you have source for, so technically you add some risk by doing this. However, you may already be taking equal or greater risks: Are you compiling Debian from source yourself or downloading a binary ISO? Are you auditing the source code yourself or just assuming someone else has done it, like everyone ...


4

I agree with your analysis of the reasons why police departments and other agencies would use "weak" encryption products with their radios: simply because as of the current day encryption crackers are rarely used by common criminals that listen to radio transmissions of such agencies (they perhaps use analog/digital radio scanners, but such scanners can ...


4

If your only problem is that the router is compromised than a reset to factory defaults will probably fix this problem. But make sure that you are really doing a factory reset and not a simple reset (restart) of the router. If your problem is also that an attacker was able to compromise the router in the first place then this problem has not been solved by ...


4

ARP spoofing only allows the redirection of traffic through your device. Netflix claims to have been using HTTPS secured video streams. This creates a secure connection between the user and Netflix of which ARP spoofing does nothing but simply redirect traffic through your machine on a LAN. It cannot decrypt the traffic, unless the traffic is WPA2 encrypted ...


4

Remember, SIM is "subscriber identity module." It identifies itself to the mobile carrier each time it talks to a cell site, and the carrier knows which cell site. The best you can hope for is that it will stop working when the original owner gets the next bill. At worst, you could be tracked down with a cell site simulator (aka "stingray") and charged ...


4

Most of the answers I'm seeing (e.g., Faraday cages) defeat the purpose of the wireless key: to unlock and start the car without having to grab the key out of your pocket. Why not have a time dependent encryption system work both ways? When the door handle is touched, the car sends a public key signal that changes with time (in ns), which the key ...


4

As the other question's answer said, Dumpper looks like it identifies the AP via its MAC address or other information exposed over the 802.11 protocol, then checks a database to work out if the default WPS key / seed generation algorithm is known. This is limited to APs whose firmware images have been reverse engineered and analysed. Jumpstart just cracks ...


3

Probably harder to do with your phone than with a laptop, but attacks can be (and have been) mounted with a phone. Your neighbor should definitely change his password just to be safe, but IMO his chances of being attacked aren't as high as one might expect. The attacker would have to find the location of the network if he didn't know it already, and then he'...


3

NFC is a standard for a packet transmission. The packet can have a payload. The payload can be harmful, but would require a program listening for that payload to do harm. So no, this can't happen unless a user installs a sent malicious app, visits a dangerous webpage, or a program that accepts NFC packets has a vulnerability. Why? Well really what you ...


3

The classical situation for radio-frequency repeaters threats concerns all radio-based identification/authentication systems (RFID cards, etc.), the goal being to establish a tunnel between the actual card located at a distant place and the authentication mechanism (a door lock for instance). In such case, the goal is not to exactly to use timing (such ...


3

Things that you should do: Update the firmware Use a strong password and WPA2 for wireless connections. Don't use WEP. Change the SSID of the router to something non-standard. This is because the SSID is used as a salt for the wireless password, and having a non-standard SSID protects against an attacker using rainbow tables generated for standard SSIDs. ...


3

These are hidden stations. The reason there are some information missing is that these accesspoints don't send beacon packets. Beacon packets are packets that contain information about the network that is broadcasting them. This is how operation systems and applications get to know wich networks are available. These networks bssids are shown anyway because ...


3

Most modern OSes have services that are responsible for parsing data received by the wireless interfaces, and if the code responsible for that is vulnerable your machine could be compromised. The only way to be safe is to tell the OS to completely disable the interfaces or at the very least ignore data received by them (on Linux for example you could kill ...


3

Yes, UPnP is by design insecure. UPnP is a protocol designed to automatically open ports in a firewall to allow an outsider to access a hosted server on a local machine that is protected by said firewall. UPnP is like mounting a lock on a door and then leaving the key in the keyhole. What's the point of mounting a lock then? It goes without explanation to ...


3

Here is something interesting from Bruce Schneier's blog: Many wireless keyboards have a security vulnerability that allow someone to hack the computer using the keyboard-computer link. (Technical details here.) An attacker can launch the attack from up to 100 meters away. The attacker is able to take control of the target computer, without ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible