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It means the access point is a hidden station which means it does not send any beacons. Airodump knows of the network existence and it's SSID because the clients did revealed it. This is why a hidden station isn't a secure one. As soon as a client is connected at least the BISSD is visible to everyone with a card in monitor mode.


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The question should be along the lines of Is my computer more vulnerable if I leave wireless on while shutting down/booting. I would say it's "possible," but most likely you are completely fine, if we assume you are up to date with patches and all that good stuff. I've seen AV Programs that have an option if you want to wait to disable the firewall ...


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In some cases it could be risky to have wireless on even for a second, particularly for those instances when you are connected to a public network.Most guys prefer their laptops to connect to wireless connections automatically which they have ever used, due to which they are in great danger of security breach.Talking about security over wireless networks its ...


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You do not need to be concerned by this. Windows 8 in particular introduced many new security features and technologies which take direct aim at early boot malware. You can read about these in some depth here: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn283963(v=ws.11).aspx One introduction for example is ELAM - Early Launch Anti-Malware, which gives ...


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"I was wondering if at any point my computer is vulnerable, even if it's for a second or two" Step away from the questions/reasoning of wireless being turned off, or on. You're running Windows 8.1, what is your system (Windows 8.1), and the software running on your laptop vulnerable to. Are your patches up to date, this includes patches for non-MS software. ...


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Who can view what you are doing? You, anyone that uses the same router (assuming you're not in Access Point isolation mode), anyone that has access to the router's access logs, possibly including the person that set up the router, and the Internet Service Provider. WPA prevents other people without access to the router from viewing your data casually from ...


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Yes, it is possible. Hacking the WiFi is the hard part and would most likely not be the method used. Unless you have a real easy to guess password like a name, place, commonly used words. Most likely way would be from your computer, if you have a back door or virus on your PC, then someone could monitor everything. Who else has access to your PC, another ...


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Contrary to a common misconception, the network key is not the encryption key. The WiFi communication is encrypted on its own using a key exchange protocol. This makes it impossible for anyone without abnormally huge processing power to decrypt anything that goes through. That said, if the person controls the router, that changes things as the router ...


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Found a script called "mass-deauth" https://github.com/m33b0/mass-deauth


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The attack vectors remain the same. The only difference is that mobile phones might provide an additional attack surface with other services reachable like Bluetooth and GSM/UMTS/GPRS/... Check public vulnerability databases for entries regarding WLAN or other network issues to determine the known attack surface of mobile devices. Once in a while there is ...


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Pixie works by exploiting weaknesses in the generation of the E-S1 and E-S2 nonces which are used to produce the enrollee hash, as described in the Pixie Dust Attack. Traditional attacks attack the two halves of the WPS PIN (PSK1, PSK2) in an online attack, essentially brute-forcing all possible options for the PIN until it is found. This has to be done ...


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If you are using a WiFi network with WPA2 encryption (which is standard nowdays), and a password of reasonable length/complexity, it is VERY hard to crack and could be considered secure, at least from a technical standpoint. Naturally people are the weak link in every system. It may be possible to coax the password out of a connected member. There should be ...


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When visitors (or clients or providers) come in your office, they are unlikely to plug their computers in an ethernet socket. But they can easily (even inadvertantly) connect their smartphone to an open WiFi. If they regurlarly come, and if the WiFi is only protected by a simple password, they will soon know it because of social engineering. Once that's ...


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This kind of depends on how strong you want your network security policy to be. Lets point out the main good and bad things about a WiFi network: Good: Convenient for the office workers to work from anywhere in the office No need for cables and switches (This saves money and time) Keep better track of your users and have more control straight from the ...



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