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WPA2 is just a commercial name for a complete implementation of the 802.11i specification (WPA implemented only a part of it as a temporary measure against WEP weakness). 802.11i is an amendment to the original 802.11 specification, which means that it replaced several part from it, the original content becoming deprecated and a new revision of the 802.11 ...


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No, unlike HTTP Basic authentication, the password isn't sent in cleartext (or obfuscated) form across the air. The weakest form of WiFi security is WEP. Don't use it, it can be cracked, but not in the way you describe. The password is used to create an encrypted tunnel as described here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wired_Equivalent_Privacy


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No, because each time you try to connect to your router it will require your computer to authenticate, not only that but the router's SSID is unique even if it's shared with another router in the same location. The reason lies not in the name but in the combination of the router's specific frequency, ip address, dns settings, ips predetermined proxy ...


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The Internet is a wild place; there are tons (as in, hundreds of thousands or even millions) of script-kiddie bots constantly scanning every single IP address looking for open ports they can connect to or unsecured servers they can exploit. This is most likely likely the kind of activity that you're seeing. Fortunately, the vast majority of consumer routers ...


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The real problem is that if you setup a rouge AP with same SSID of the original, NO encryption at all and with a stronger wifi signal then the client will connect to the rogue AP. So you don't have to setup a rogue AP with encryption enabled. It's just a matter of broadcasting a DeAuth packet (which unfortunately is not authenticated) At this point you ...



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