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1

It shouldn't matter. The 802.11 de-authentication attack is not attacking the computer so the Operating System of the client should not matter. It is attacking the network itself by telling the router that the clients are done the connection and are disconnecting. There are defences for de-authentication attacks but it is not based on the OS. It is ...


0

Any SSL with a single trusted key for each party in this communication would be ok. You would have to exchange keys between devices first. I mean something like pgp-sms, but implemented for communication across wifi


1

Not only is your device sending probe requests to the networks it has been connected to (unless it is already connected), but in some cases it seems that when you are spoofing MAC address of another device in your surroundings (and this one is being shut down), it may even replicate sending probe requests to APs it was never connected to and are out of reach ...


3

My approach to this was to use an OpenWRT (could be done with DDwrt or other similar projects) device (a TPlink 3600) and to use only tcpdump and monitor mode (not airodump). Using TCPdump lets you see all traffic (to profile area activity as well as watching for beacons/probes) The advantage to using a dedicated device is they are inexpensive, use little ...


5

After putting your wireless network card in monitor mode as mentioned in the other answers, you can do something like the following to print out MAC addresses and ssid. This code is dependent on the scapy library/tool. #!/usr/bin/env python from scapy.all import * conf.iface = "mon0" def handle_pkt(pkt): if Dot11 in pkt and pkt[Dot11].type == 0 and ...


6

This should work for most Linuxes: sudo apt-get install aircrack-ng sudo airmon-ng start <card> sudo airodump-ng mon0 This outputs a list of what all devices are trying to connect to. Some devices only probe networks that are available, however, as you suspected, smartphones probe all networks that they know about, no matter whether they are ...


10

For example, using the great aircrack-ng, specifically the airodump-ng utility from it. The information you are looking for will show up under "Probes" in the lower section.


37

Fairly easy to be honest, all you need is to do is listen for Probe Requests. There is a nice blog explaining how to go about setting up a computer with BT5 to listen for them here. With a networking card that supports "Monitor mode", you are able to pick up so called "Probe requests". Once the networking card is set up to be in monitor mode you can use ...



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