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If you have a rooted Android connected over WiFi, dsploit is an excellent tool. It can perform active attacks of various kinds, as well as network scans. MITM with sslstrip and content substitution is an option. http://www.dsploit.net/


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This also applies to normal chip cards. Its not limited to NFC. If you manage to social engineer a user into using the card at a fake terminal, then the relay attack can happen too. One solution of distance bounding, is to apply logic on the server side that would check if a specific authentication attempt can be logically correct. Lets say you have 2 ...


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You might be interested in the WiFi Pineapple from Hak5, which provides turn-key MitM functionality. Troy Hunt has a helpful quick start guide.


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Wireless protocols, or even wired protocols, are based on packets, often called frames. A typical frame will have a checksum, that is used to detect whether the frame was damaged or not. If the frame is detected as damaged, it is dropped altogether; it is up to the upper layers to provision for acknowledge and reemission of missing frames (that's what TCP ...


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At a bare minimum, you expose the account the service runs as. If the service is subject to attack, then that becomes a vulnerability. This is no different from exposing any other service, except that it is exposing a communications channel. The important question is, "what else on the box is using that communication channel?" You need to chase down the ...


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For NFC technology, the main solution that has been offered to date is distance bounding, in which a tightly timed exchange of challenges and responses persuades the verfier that the prover cannot be further away than a certain distance. This solution, however, has some drawbacks: It still won't say whether the specific endpoint the verifier is talking to ...


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There are a few critical details missing. What OS were you using? Many platforms provide or require code signing, but you don't tell us what platform you're using. OSX will by default only run signed binaries. Windows displays the CN of the signing certificate if present (or something like that--I can't remember the precise behavior). iOS will only ...


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Here's a whitepaper from logitech on the technology. They seem to believe it is secure, and apparently the two devices are paired at the factory. The actual key never gets broadcast. It has a short range of about 33 feet. It certainly isn't 100%, but if you're worried about the NSA... I doubt this is your biggest problem. A regular keyboard is most likely ...


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If your connection to the source was through https, you most likely didn't have the data being transferred tampered with. You would have to be the target of a fairly talented hacker that's been waiting for you specifically. This assumes that the certificate you accepted on the unsecured wifi was valid however. Since you were on an unsecured wifi, you could ...


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In order to act as a proper access point, your card needs to support "master"/"AP" mode. You can fake it if the card supports "monitor" mode with packet injection (in this case, your AP software will be performing many of the tasks that the driver/card would be performing in "master" mode), and you can get some of the functionality of an AP if your card ...


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When I perform iw list I have a third option, monitor. Supported interface modes: * IBSS * managed * monitor I think this is what your IOCTL failure is stemming from. Your wireless interface needs to have a monitor mode. Try the following command (as root) to enable RFMON and I believe it will fix your problem. iwconfig [interface] ...


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Hacking a television station is hard. Most of the broadcast infrastructure isn't connected to the Internet, making outside intrusion difficult or impossible. Let's say you want to hack your local news station. Problem #1 is that their equipment isn't connected to the Internet -- it's quite possible that they're still using a bank of Betamax machines for ...


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The part of WEP you describe isn't really a major weakness because most encryption algorithms in use today are immune to known-plaintext attacks. Basically, this means that having access to both the encrypted data and the decrypted plaintext will not help you figure out the key in any way - so "figuring out the password from here" would NOT be ...



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