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If you are using a WiFi network with WPA2 encryption (which is standard nowdays), and a password of reasonable length/complexity, it is VERY hard to crack and could be considered secure, at least from a technical standpoint. Naturally people are the weak link in every system. It may be possible to coax the password out of a connected member. There should be ...


0

When visitors (or clients or providers) come in your office, they are unlikely to plug their computers in an ethernet socket. But they can easily (even inadvertantly) connect their smartphone to an open WiFi. If they regurlarly come, and if the WiFi is only protected by a simple password, they will soon know it because of social engineering. Once that's ...


3

This kind of depends on how strong you want your network security policy to be. Lets point out the main good and bad things about a WiFi network: Good: Convenient for the office workers to work from anywhere in the office No need for cables and switches (This saves money and time) Keep better track of your users and have more control straight from the ...


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This is happening because your AP is able to filter out the MAC address and block it after an x amount of requests. What you need to do is to change the MAC address every x requests so the router won't be able to lock you out. Use reaver mac address changer: Reaver -i mon0 -c x -b xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx -vv --mac=vv:vv:vv:vv:vv:vv Warning: This might crash your ...


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Most places that provide free WiFi just don't care about security, and they want to make it as easy as possible for customers to connect. Since users of such open WiFi by-and-large don't care about security either, there's not much pressure for them to change that mentality. However it's not really as difficult to secure such a network as others here have ...


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Promiscuous mode just means your (Wireless) Network Interface Card (NIC) looks at all packets it hears, not just ones addressed to it (with its own MAC address). With no encryption, promiscuous mode on wifi will only capture packets on the SSID that you have joined (and ignore packets on other wifi SSIDs). With encryption (WPA2), in promiscuous mode your ...


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Here is something interesting from Bruce Schneier's blog: Many wireless keyboards have a security vulnerability that allow someone to hack the computer using the keyboard-computer link. (Technical details here.) An attacker can launch the attack from up to 100 meters away. The attacker is able to take control of the target computer, without ...



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