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WPA uses a 256-bit key. This means that a dictionary containing all possible passwords would have 115,792,089,237,316,195,423,570,985,008,687,907,853,269,984,665,640,564,039,457,584,007,913,129,639,936 entries.


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If you don't have permission, breaking into someone else's network is illegal regardless of why you're doing so. If you really want to learn about the security vulnerabilities of WPA-PSK and WEP, I recommend setting up your own AP and practice breaking into it.


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Robert - I recently was faced with the same issue. Wireshark does not decode SSL over EAP. What you can do is fake Wireshark out and take the entire ssl conversation and build it into a pseudo tcp session with the SSL data from the original eap packets and retransmit the frames. I used Python raw sockets to generate the tcp session and then capture the ...


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In the scenario you have outlined it is in fact possible, at least in theory, to sniff the connection. Okay, so WEP is easy to crack, and if you are using, you should stop and get on to WPA2, which is far more secure, and nearly impossible to break. In each of these cases you will need to have some sort of password/key set up. If it's just your own access ...


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Basically, the key pair of the server works as a kind of passphrase for the HTTPS connection. The public key is added to the certificate, which is then signed by a certificate authority trusted by the client. HTTPS requires the website to get a certificate, as you mentioned. This certificate is must be trusted by the client, otherwise the client will deny ...



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