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This is impossible without knowing the password (WPA prevents this). However, you can set up an open fake accesspoint and use a captive portal to get the password in clear text. This would require you to social engineer the target into connecting to your accesspoint. You can for example keep sending deauth requests to the real AP and let the captive portal ...


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It's the Security parameter. From experience, if you make the rogue AP's security protocol as same as the real AP with the same key, the clients will connect to the rogue AP when the real AP shuts down.


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Check the mask_attack page of the hashcat wiki. For your case: oclHashCat64.bin -m 2500 -a 3 -1 ?l?u?d ?1?1?1?1?1?1?1?1 [YOUR HASH OR HASH FILE] "-m 2500" specifies the WPA/WPA2 hash type, per hashcat documentation "-a 3" is the brute force attack mode "-1 ?l?u?d" says to use the character set of lowercase, uppercase, and digits (the character set you ...


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No password is sent during the 4-way handshake. When a client connects to an access point (AP) using WPA2-PSK, the pre-shared key (PSK) is, as the name suggests, already known by both parties. So there is no need to exchange it again. Do not confuse this with other scenarios where no pre-shared secret is available. (Say, you're connecting to a website via ...


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Quoting the description on Wikipedia: The four-way handshake The four-way handshake is designed so that the access point (or authenticator) and wireless client (or supplicant) can independently prove to each other that they know the PSK/PMK, without ever disclosing the key. Instead of disclosing the key, the access point & client each ...


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From my knowledge WPA2 does this (encrypting the connection between client and router with a key different for each device) WPA2 uses the authentification handshake to generate multiple keys. 2 of these are: Temporal Key (TK) – Used to encrypt/decrypt Unicast data packets Group Temporal Encryption Key The first one is used to encrypt unicast connections ...


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WAP2 only secures the wifi against outsiders. Once you are in the inside, e.g. using the service, your transmission medium is considered trusting, and it is up to the other layers to use other means of security and/or encryption. Or put otherwise, the encryption done at WPA2 only is effective for who is kept outside the network. Regular spoofing attacks ...



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