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Most places that provide free WiFi just don't care about security, and they want to make it as easy as possible for customers to connect. Since users of such open WiFi by-and-large don't care about security either, there's not much pressure for them to change that mentality. However it's not really as difficult to secure such a network as others here have ...


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Promiscuous mode just means your (Wireless) Network Interface Card (NIC) looks at all packets it hears, not just ones addressed to it (with its own MAC address). With no encryption, promiscuous mode on wifi will only capture packets on the SSID that you have joined (and ignore packets on other wifi SSIDs). With encryption (WPA2), in promiscuous mode your ...


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Changing the SSID is for security purposes because when you change the SSID settings you can hide the SSID from discovery as well. Wifite on Kali can crack the key to my WPA2 secured AP in about 4 hours. Also some keys are out there and in wordlists that someone would use for an attack.


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TKIP is vulnerable to an attack similar to the WEP "ChopChop" attack. TKIP uses MIC for guaranteeing the integrity of an encrypted frame. If more than two MIC failures are observed in a 60 second window, both the Access Point (AP) and client station shut down for 60 seconds. The newer TKIP attack uses a mechanism similar to the “chopchop” WEP attack to ...


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As described, the disadvantage to allowing TKIP (also known as WPA) is that there is a known weakness. AES (used in WPA2) is more robust. Setting it to a mode that allows both will allow older devices that don't support WPA2 to connect in WPA mode, while devices that do support WPA2 will use that instead. Setting it to AES only comes at the price of ...



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