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Yes you can attack this. But if there're no significant improvements in cryptanalysis (quite unlikely for AES) you'll be dead a long time before the computations finish. Now to decompose your question: Is AES(-128/-256) by itself secure? Yes, the best cryptologists in the world believe that AES has no significant weaknesses and recent NSA leaks shows that ...


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The quick answer is "no". We know from long experience that nothing is "perfectly" secure. AES has no significant flaws that we know about today, and has key sizes that are large enough to resist brute force attacks forever. People have been studying it for a decade, looking for weaknesses, and have only come up with some weak keys, and reduced round ...


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You're missing the bigger question: why? Encryption adds greatly to the coffee shop's cost. There are small one-time costs incurred when someone has to configure the access points, assign passwords, manage them, change them, post signs saying "this week's password is C0ffeebuck$" etc. There is an ongoing high payroll cost, too. Baristas are paid to ...


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Even with WPA2/AES, someone can see the password, or if that is not possible, here is a simple way:- See some people who come around daily. Get some backdoors or rootkits for them. It would require skill but anything on same network/file share can be hacked. Go in, connect to your internet, get the key, and voila. As simple as that. So no amount of ...


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To check for information about nearby networks using an inbuilt OS X utility called Wireless Diagnostics, follow the steps: 1. Option+Click on the WIFI Menu Icon. 2. Click on "Open Wireless Diagnostics". 3. As Wireless Diagnostics opens, go to Menu Item "Window" and select 'Scan'. This will show you information about nearby networks. Hope that helps.


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WPA is the authentication and encryption system preventing people not knowing the right password to access a Wifi network. However, no matter if it is WPA2 protected or not, you may legitimately not trust Wifi networks from hotels and other public places. The usual advice in such condition is to use a VPN. It is an application which will build a secured ...


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Yes it is true that two devices on the same network can 'sniff' each other. You can see plenty of documentation and examples of this on google. A brief history lesson: Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) was created as a direct response and replacement increasing number of vulnerabilities in the WEP standard. personally: I would stick to WPA2 with a strong ...


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Since one factor is the awkwardness of entering passwords, especially on a tablet. there is a good argument to stick with alphanumerics and forget about symbols. It's also a more general problem, website passwords and such, that most symbols are rejected. But since you only need the enter the password once per device. there's not a huge obstacle there. ...


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Different Encryption Key Per User It is important to start by clarifying your question since terminology is important when discussing encryption: I think a more pointed question in pursuit of your goal is "What technology would allow a sufficiently different encryption key per user, so that when multiple users are on the same AP it would be very difficult ...


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I solve it for both WPA and WPA2 using MIC_SET, ACK and NONCE fields. MIC_SET | ACK | NONCE | Packet Number 0 | 1 | x | 1 1 | 0 | x | 2 1 | 1 | x | 3 1 | 0 | 0 | 4 Where with x I indicate that the NONCE has a value different of ...



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