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The difference between the two keys is that the Master key (PMK) is supposed to be valid for at least as long as the client is connected. In the case of WPA-PSK, the PMK is the same from the moment the AP is configured until either the passphrase or the SSID changes. Therefore, if the PMK is compromised in any way, the attacker gains "permanent" access to ...


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WPA2 is just a commercial name for a complete implementation of the 802.11i specification (WPA implemented only a part of it as a temporary measure against WEP weakness). 802.11i is an amendment to the original 802.11 specification, which means that it replaced several part from it, the original content becoming deprecated and a new revision of the 802.11 ...


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Try to stop Networkmanager: /etc/init.d/network-manager stop


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WPS would generally only be used for the initial connection because the wireless network settings (pass-phrase/SSID) are saved on the connecting device. I don't know if it is possible to "force" clients to connect every time with WPS. If it is...I would not recommend it. WPS is insecure. A quick search for "WPS Hack" on a search engine will provide you with ...



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