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5

EMET software participates in a defence-in-depth approach of security. It adds an effective supplementary security layer when an attacker manages to successfully exploit a vulnerable software without being blocked by the anti-virus. However, in such domain is an endless race, since while EMET is getting more popular, attackers will try to craft their ...


5

I drove a project that looked at this while I was at Microsoft. The answer is that the vast majority of breakins do not use 0 day. We used malware as a proxy for breakins, because data was more accessible and puts the use of 0days in perspective. The data here doesn't break out sophisticated attackers, but the arguments you put forth as to why no one ...


5

I think that the answers you get here are mostly speculations. But the question is interesting nevertheless. I see the following main reasons: Other usual attack vectors like Java or ActiveX were harder to exploit because the relevant functionality was either switched off or layers of interaction were added (i.e. click to play, warnings with unsigned code ...


4

Highly customized and patched hypervisors, sandboxes around said hypervisors to mitigate breakouts, and heavy monitoring. Of course, any given server only hosts so many VMs, so a breakout is fundamentally limited to a finite number of guests, if it's able to get past the protections outside the hypervisor. For example, QEMU can be compiled with a hardened ...


4

One of the methods you can use to create a baseline would be to go to sites like PacketStorm find say the last 50 vulnerabilities/exploits disclosed, then find out whether or not they have CVEs issued on Mitre. A baseline will give you just that, a baseline average. There are a few things to take into considerations: Not all exploits/vulnerabilities are ...


3

The relative costs depend very much on what the vulnerability is. To demonstrate this, I'm going to refer to two semi-recent vulnerabilities: the Bash "Shellshock" bug, and the glibc "Ghost" gethostbyname() bug. Shellshock The Shellshock bug was caused by an intricate flaw in Bash's function parsing that could be used to make Bash execute code directly ...


3

Instead of placing your trust in Rogers (or any internet provider), you can certainly take responsibility for your own security. Purchase your own router/firewall appliance, and connect all your home machines to it. Then connect your router to the Rogers router. That way, even if your Rogers' router is compromised, the infection remains isolated outside ...


2

Part of the reason is more people looking for vulnerabilities I think: Throughout 2015, vulnerability disclosure programs and the security community have been immensely helpful in identifying CVE’s. Approximately one-third of our reports this year were via Project Zero alone. Many of these were non-trivial as many of the reported bugs required ...


1

Honestly it really depends on the company. Every company handles their vulnerabilities differently, even some researchers who follow the process get screwed by it, just like this guy who filed a bug for Instagram. For those entered through the bug bounty program (if they have one), they will generally publish the information on their site or email to the ...


1

Breaking in is all about research. You need to spend time surveying a network and it's various points of entry or access. Part of that will be reviewing the hardware firmware and software running. The first point of attack I might pick would be wifi. I would find out the model of access point they use and then download the firmware. Once I have the ...



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