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Jan
11
comment Why would security cover things like natural disasters?
I guess my point is, in a practical scenario, which would a company more likely do: make sure they have a good quality roof, or pay for water proof computers? With the security perspective we seem to be talking about the latter, which isn't cost effective.
Jan
11
comment Why would security cover things like natural disasters?
So anything that would hamper availability is a security problem? Somethings seem to be more a usability issue, like if the user does not know how to turn on the computer or insert the media.
Jan
11
revised Why would security cover things like natural disasters?
added 69 characters in body
Jan
11
comment Why would security cover things like natural disasters?
@Josef 1) I wouldn't call it blame I'd call it reasonable 2) It wasn't a security measure in the first place to have a non-leaking roof so it wouldn't be the security analyst's fault 3) in that sense what wouldn't be security?
Jan
10
revised Why would security cover things like natural disasters?
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Jan
10
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
10
awarded  Good Question
Jan
10
revised Why would security cover things like natural disasters?
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Jan
10
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
10
reviewed Reject and Edit Why would security cover things like natural disasters?
Jan
10
revised Why would security cover things like natural disasters?
deleted 2 characters in body; edited title
Jan
10
comment Why would security cover things like natural disasters?
Isn't that an overly pedantic view of availability? If there's someone using a computer that you need to be on, you wouldn't say that's a security problem.
Jan
10
asked Why would security cover things like natural disasters?
Dec
20
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
19
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
15
comment What is a YubiKey and how does it work?
Ya but you don't necessarily know a file is a keyfile on a USB stick or what password/username it goes with. Could you elaborate on this attack vector about how USB sticks are easy to read so that would compromise the key file?
Dec
14
comment What are attackers trying to achieve when doing attacks on local programs such as buffer overflows?
But isn't a user already doing code execution by running the program? So what's the gain?
Dec
14
asked What are attackers trying to achieve when doing attacks on local programs such as buffer overflows?
Dec
14
accepted Must an attacker using a Smurf attack be on the same network as the victim?
Dec
13
comment Encrypting files on Google Drive
7-zip portable isn't available for OS X