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reviewed Approve Does WhatsApp disclose the sender's IP address?
Aug
27
reviewed Approve Is a server infrastructure fundamentally possible which the smartest person can't breach?
Aug
25
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
17
reviewed Approve How does Windows 10 allow Microsoft to spy on you?
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17
reviewed Approve imap tag wiki
Aug
17
reviewed Approve imap tag wiki excerpt
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reviewed Approve Is there any technical security reason not to buy the cheapest SSL certificate you can find?
Aug
15
reviewed Approve Is using my phone number as a pin for a phone a security risk?
Aug
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awarded  Announcer
Aug
1
comment SIP DoS classifications
Thanks! As for why, it's a community guideline (see "Provide context for links"). I do see your point though!
Aug
1
comment How to prevent swapping on Mac osx?
The question is about swapping, not about information security. It just so happens to be about Tails, but it could have been any other OS. Voting to move to SuperUser.
Aug
1
comment SIP DoS classifications
It's recommended to highlight the most important parts of the article you linked in case the link goes dead.
Aug
1
answered Can this text be figured out?
Jul
25
awarded  Constituent
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24
reviewed Approve Securing SQL injection for my PHP files
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16
reviewed Approve AV isn't dead, so why network appliances differ in handling malicious code
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14
awarded  Caucus
Jul
14
reviewed Approve How do I find vulnerabilities in software?
Jul
10
comment How does the password become 30,000 times stronger?
@JekwA Using 7-bit ASCII, I count 127-32=95 printable characters. Minus 10 digits and 52 letters (uppercase and lowercase), you get 33 special characters, which includes space. Excluding space you have 32 special characters. Both get close to 30,000 (one above, one below).
Jul
10
comment How does the password become 30,000 times stronger?
@user80723 No, it's just ones and zeros to the computer. The byte 00111000 (which we read as 8) is the same to a computer as the byte 00100001 (which we read as !).