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comment Does FTPS (FTP+S) offer better security than SFTP on the server side?
"open a wide range of ports (which is insecure!)" Without any reasons given as to why that would be insecure, I think it's a bit of an odd statement. I generally disagree (if your security depends upon ports being closed, something is probably wrong), but I thought I'd comment and ask before just editing it... (Overall, good answer though -- upvoted.)
2d
comment What is AES 256 bit encryption?
@lismathwizard "people aren't downvoting OP because he is asking the wrong question" I know, I said "pretty sure it's because you can google this". The "it's not the right question" is additional, and that's why I think it is worth asking and answering: someone is trying to understand this stuff. We could at least attempt answering it properly once and refer future users to this question/answer. I do totally see (and partly agree) with your point though, this question doesn't show much effort on their part.
2d
answered What is AES 256 bit encryption?
2d
revised Why aren't ransomware deployers arrested?
edited body
Apr
19
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
19
awarded  Announcer
Apr
18
revised What should you do if you catch ransomware mid-operation?
added 347 characters in body
Apr
18
comment What should you do if you catch ransomware mid-operation?
@AntonBanchev I see. I'd almost install it in a virtual machine, just to see if it's slow enough to call the police and have their forensics team show up before it's done encrypting all files! Jokes aside, I am curious about its performance. I'll also update the post.
Apr
18
comment What should you do if you catch ransomware mid-operation?
@TomášZato That is actually a good point. Not sure how to solve that... if you pull the power, you might get none of the files back; if you look for process suspending and dump the memory, you could probably get everything back. However if you do the latter and it doesn't work, you indeed lost a bunch of files. Difficult to say which is better.
Apr
18
comment What should you do if you catch ransomware mid-operation?
@TomášZato Step 1: duckduckgo.com/?q=suspend+process+windows+7&t=ffsb Step 2: superuser.com/q/426351/121343 -- On most Linux systems it's included in the system monitor (also in htop you can send a STOP signal via the "GUI"), and on servers it's a quick google to find that it's kill -STOP processid.
Apr
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
18
revised What should you do if you catch ransomware mid-operation?
added 2055 characters in body
Apr
18
comment What should you do if you catch ransomware mid-operation?
@AntonBanchev (To your first comment:) I very much doubt that. I know a public/private key might very well be used in the process (hybrid crypto), but encrypting lots of data with public key encryption is extremely slow. It's so uncommon to do, I can hardly find any RSA benchmarks that are comparative to AES. Out of maybe 20 hits, this is the only real answer, and it doesn't disclose raw numbers or methods, it just says it's 1000 times slower: stackoverflow.com/a/118488
Apr
18
answered What should you do if you catch ransomware mid-operation?
Apr
10
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
8
comment How does SSL/TLS work?
@Iwazaru All CAs do this since day one. The point of a certificate is to provide the public key for a given domain, and the point of signing it to prove it really is the right key for the domain. Let's Encrypt is doing exactly what it should be doing: verifying you own the domain, and sign your certificate (with your key) if you can prove it. Now everyone who trusts Let's Encrypt, which is practically every browser, will trust that certificate.
Apr
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
3
revised Risks of giving a hacker my WPA key for my router?
edited tags
Feb
16
comment Should I change the private key when renewing a certificate?
This is actually a good point, not brought up in any other answer. Lots of people have access to the key over time, whynot change it? Like you change a door code when an employee leaves? (You do that, right?)
Feb
7
comment While working from home, is it a bad idea to give the company you work for your IP address?
@ChrisCirefice See security.stackexchange.com/q/35160/10863 for the generic question. The answers are a bit specific, but the question is there.