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comment Does FTPS (FTP+S) offer better security than SFTP on the server side?
@SteffenUllrich I see your point of a trojan, but if someone can run code on your system already it can probably do enough damage without an open port. I still think it's not a big issue, but this probably belongs in a separate answer. (There are some questions about it already 1 2 3 4 5 6, but none of the answers are exhaustive.)
Apr
28
comment Does FTPS (FTP+S) offer better security than SFTP on the server side?
"open a wide range of ports (which is insecure!)" Without any reasons given as to why that would be insecure, I think it's a bit of an odd statement. I generally disagree (if your security depends upon ports being closed, something is probably wrong), but I thought I'd comment and ask before just editing it... (Overall, good answer though -- upvoted.)
Apr
26
comment What is AES 256 bit encryption?
@lismathwizard "people aren't downvoting OP because he is asking the wrong question" I know, I said "pretty sure it's because you can google this". The "it's not the right question" is additional, and that's why I think it is worth asking and answering: someone is trying to understand this stuff. We could at least attempt answering it properly once and refer future users to this question/answer. I do totally see (and partly agree) with your point though, this question doesn't show much effort on their part.
Apr
18
comment What should you do if you catch ransomware mid-operation?
@AntonBanchev I see. I'd almost install it in a virtual machine, just to see if it's slow enough to call the police and have their forensics team show up before it's done encrypting all files! Jokes aside, I am curious about its performance. I'll also update the post.
Apr
18
comment What should you do if you catch ransomware mid-operation?
@TomášZato That is actually a good point. Not sure how to solve that... if you pull the power, you might get none of the files back; if you look for process suspending and dump the memory, you could probably get everything back. However if you do the latter and it doesn't work, you indeed lost a bunch of files. Difficult to say which is better.
Apr
18
comment What should you do if you catch ransomware mid-operation?
@TomášZato Step 1: duckduckgo.com/?q=suspend+process+windows+7&t=ffsb Step 2: superuser.com/q/426351/121343 -- On most Linux systems it's included in the system monitor (also in htop you can send a STOP signal via the "GUI"), and on servers it's a quick google to find that it's kill -STOP processid.
Apr
18
comment What should you do if you catch ransomware mid-operation?
@AntonBanchev (To your first comment:) I very much doubt that. I know a public/private key might very well be used in the process (hybrid crypto), but encrypting lots of data with public key encryption is extremely slow. It's so uncommon to do, I can hardly find any RSA benchmarks that are comparative to AES. Out of maybe 20 hits, this is the only real answer, and it doesn't disclose raw numbers or methods, it just says it's 1000 times slower: stackoverflow.com/a/118488
Apr
8
comment How does SSL/TLS work?
@Iwazaru All CAs do this since day one. The point of a certificate is to provide the public key for a given domain, and the point of signing it to prove it really is the right key for the domain. Let's Encrypt is doing exactly what it should be doing: verifying you own the domain, and sign your certificate (with your key) if you can prove it. Now everyone who trusts Let's Encrypt, which is practically every browser, will trust that certificate.
Feb
16
comment Should I change the private key when renewing a certificate?
This is actually a good point, not brought up in any other answer. Lots of people have access to the key over time, whynot change it? Like you change a door code when an employee leaves? (You do that, right?)
Feb
7
comment While working from home, is it a bad idea to give the company you work for your IP address?
@ChrisCirefice See security.stackexchange.com/q/35160/10863 for the generic question. The answers are a bit specific, but the question is there.
Feb
4
comment How trustworthy is Firefox?
Just to be clear, you are talking about the Sync feature of Firefox? Or merely the offline password storage when using a master password?
Jan
9
comment How secure is WD MyPassport lock
Regarding "When the user changes his password, K is decrypted with the old password and re-encrypted with the new." (and the rest of that paragraph): is there actually a name for this scheme? I refer to it now and then but end up explaining it over and over.
Nov
29
comment Spoofing IP address as being local over the Internet
But ISPs are, for example.
Nov
29
comment Spoofing IP address as being local over the Internet
@ash More or less, but there is a big difference between, say, "basically it's never done" and "near universal in the western world". I don't know which of the two it is and it's pretty easy to distinguish between the former and the latter, even if all you have is personal accounts. That's what I'm after. And you could say the same for a thousand other questions, like "why do some websites only allow short passwords" (or something like that is one of the more popular questions on this site). I could perhaps rephrase my question to "why doesn't everyone" to make it more objective...
Nov
29
comment Spoofing IP address as being local over the Internet
Well they do the same with filtering port 25 or something, it's just checking a few bytes with hardly any conditionals or other complexity. But anyway, your point is that they don't for performance reasons, thus RFC1918 @IPs will typically arrive just fine if it's not filtered by the destination network or host?
Nov
29
comment Spoofing IP address as being local over the Internet
Well the edge routers at my ISP certainly have an inside and outside, but more importantly, no ISP routers nor any Internet core routers should ever see any RFC1918 addresses... right? Or am I missing something?
Nov
28
comment Spoofing IP address as being local over the Internet
I assume "@IP" is shorthand for "IP address" or something? And you only mention ingress filtering, but what about egress filtering by my ISP or other core Internet routers? That is also part of the answer to the question whether it'll arrive on the other end.
Nov
25
comment Is the same browser equally safe on a different OS?
@RS I don't know, I'd assume it's mostly the same between operating systems, not considering ASLR and such.
Nov
22
comment Decoding base64 encoded message with a key
@dave_thompson_085 Yeah I can't imagine what they were thinking to design this either, but a custom alphabet would be implemented in code, not stored in the database I'd think, so this would have to be for encryption... then again, abhi_kaffe just mentioned each row is the same, so perhaps they really did just want to use a custom alphabet for some reason.
Nov
21
comment Decoding base64 encoded message with a key
In earlier comments you said the field was 64 characters long but this is 134 characters long, which is not even divisible by 64. I can't really tell you what you're supposed to do with this...