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2d
comment Could keystroke timing improve security on a password?
For that matter, I have different mouse/keyboard combinations for the same device (laptop). When I'm traveling, I use a mini-keyboard, or even the one that's molded into the laptop, when I'm at my desk at work, I have a different keyboard/mouse set than I do at home, etc. The timing on my keystrokes varies wildly according to that, in addition to time of day (caffeine/tired) and gawd only knows what else. Keystroke dynamics are just a fundamentally poor choice for a security feature.
2d
comment Could keystroke timing improve security on a password?
The idea is that an individual types certain keys in a certain way that does not change much over time. Anyone who thinks this hasn't watched anyone work before their morning cup of caffeine. Sounds like a great way to get someone to smash their computer into a smoldering pile with their coffee cup to me.
Apr
19
answered Mitigating the risk for a successful ransomware infection
Apr
18
comment Are there more hacks done by social engineering, etc, than breaking the software system?
Only amateurs attack machines; professionals target people. -- Bruce Schneier This is because your defense is only as strong as its weakest point, and that weakest point is almost always going to be a person. Having said that, your question's too broad to answer. Define "hack". Is it a hack when a jealous lover tries to access his/her partner's Facebook account or smartphone? And then how would you go about collecting data on hacks or attempted hacks? Most aren't even noticed, let alone reported, so any stats you do get would have a massive hole and bias built into them.
Apr
18
answered Why aren't hardware R/W switches used to defend hard drives?
Mar
3
comment How does an attack on a digital signature work?
The attack here is simple, it is called "lying". I actually loled there, thank you.
Feb
23
comment Why hasn't anyone taken over Tor yet?
@a20 Well, almost correct. We actually do know that the NSA gets involved with (or did get involved with) using their spying powers against run-of-the-mill criminals. See "Parallel Reconstruction". What's a bunch of perjury and constitutional desecration between federal agencies, right? :/
Feb
22
awarded  Revival
Feb
22
comment Online shops SSL certificates and VISA/MasterCard
@Rambalac It's international. The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is a proprietary information security standard for organizations that handle branded credit cards from the major card schemes including Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover, and JCB. If you want to process their credit cards, you'll be held tp PCI DSS for determining liability of fraudulent charges, regardless of which country you're in.
Feb
21
revised If A Password Is Unique, Does It Really Matter How “Strong” It Is?
Fixed a couple typos. Then replaced a word for the 6 character edit minimum.
Feb
21
comment What are the potential privacy issues in using a TPM chip with GNU/Linux
@NeilSmithline Assuming he knows what he's doing, he's probably looking into buying something like this. Yup, add-on TPM chips are a thing.
Feb
20
suggested approved edit on If A Password Is Unique, Does It Really Matter How “Strong” It Is?
Feb
20
revised Why is my phone connection secure without a password when WiFi is not even with a password?
Minor grammar.
Feb
20
suggested approved edit on Why is my phone connection secure without a password when WiFi is not even with a password?
Feb
20
comment What happened to US-CERT Weekly Vulnerability Bulletins?
@RoraΖ Yurp. We are resolving issues affecting our weekly security bulletins, but hope to resume posting them soon.
Feb
20
revised What happened to US-CERT Weekly Vulnerability Bulletins?
added 444 characters in body
Feb
19
awarded  Yearling
Feb
19
answered What happened to US-CERT Weekly Vulnerability Bulletins?
Feb
19
comment Encryption: Files that can't be encrypted/cryptolocker family doesn't encrypt?
@Robin Well... yes, I suppose that would probably work. But moving and/or changing the file extensions of all the files you want to prevent from being encrypted seems like a lot more work than ... well, for lack of a better phrasing ... "doing it right."
Feb
19
answered Strong password vs. restriction on number of attempts