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seen Sep 4 '12 at 17:14

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accepted What number of bits does a browser use to generate a key?
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comment Understanding 2048 bit SSL and 256 bit encryption
Thanks for the details, @AJ!
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comment Is it okay to just secure (using SSL) the login page, but not the rest of the site?
Thanks AviD. I've actually been pretty active on SO (different login), so I'm quite familiar with using the site. I guess I slipped when it came to this one. Sorry about that, but got some good answers out of it. :)
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comment Is it okay to just secure (using SSL) the login page, but not the rest of the site?
For those interested in this topic, I found another great answer on StackOverflow: stackoverflow.com/questions/1211638/…
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accepted Is it okay to just secure (using SSL) the login page, but not the rest of the site?
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awarded  Supporter
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comment What number of bits does a browser use to generate a key?
excellent info! Thanks for the link to the other post as that answers another question I had.
Aug
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asked Is it okay to just secure (using SSL) the login page, but not the rest of the site?
Aug
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comment What number of bits does a browser use to generate a key?
Great, thank you @AJ!
Aug
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comment Understanding 2048 bit SSL and 256 bit encryption
Great info! However, wouldn't the tougher algorithm imply a greater level of security? I'm referring this part in your answer, "That said, because the algorithm is based on something that is simply really hard to figure out (but is solvable), it is less secure than a symmetric algorithm based on a shared secret (more on that later). "
Aug
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comment Understanding 2048 bit SSL and 256 bit encryption
@CodesInChaos: I agree, but maybe it is useful? Given the accepted answer below, my question is how would the client know to generate a random 256 bit key? (Why not 128?). If the server plays a role in the client's decision, then I can understand why the vendor would display this info.
Aug
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asked What number of bits does a browser use to generate a key?
Aug
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comment Understanding 2048 bit SSL and 256 bit encryption
Ignore that question - I get it now. I combined your answer with the one in this post: security.stackexchange.com/questions/13688/… Thank you!
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accepted Understanding 2048 bit SSL and 256 bit encryption