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location Troy, NY
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visits member for 1 years, 7 months
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May
20
comment What about AD2P vulnerability?
@PeakReconstructionWavelength - I'm not even sure how you would begin. You could try connecting with a device that isn't paired and see if you can discover or pair, but really, I think you'd need some kind of broad spectrum receiver to try to pull the raw information out of the air. I don't really think testing for vulnerabilities is all that viable on an individual's budget. Maybe someone else knows of a bluetooth radio that can do it, but I think they use frequency hoping that would make it a challenge.
May
20
comment Can Windows 7 hibernation files be recovered?
@Gilles - I didn't say there is no security implications to recovering a hibernation file, however the question did not ask about the security implications. It asked about if they CAN be recovered, not what it means to security. I agree there are security implications, but that is what the question should be then. Every question asked in the question is about what information is there and if it is possible. Not what security implications are of that info.
May
20
comment Can Windows 7 hibernation files be recovered?
This does seem to be off topic for Security as I don't see a security question here. I have voted to migrate to Super User.
May
18
comment How secure is using CRAM-MD5 for email authentication, when not using an SSL connection?
@E-sushi no problem, thanks for the note. Nice thing about SE is we generally get lots of great answers.
May
17
comment How secure is using CRAM-MD5 for email authentication, when not using an SSL connection?
Yeah, I saw the Dovecot bit, but wasn't sure if their mail service provider was using that particular system. Either way, it's a huge risk to be taking with the credentials when you can get a trusted SSL cert for under $60 a year.
May
17
comment Touch Screen Password Guessing by Fingerprint Trace
@LarsH - maybe they could make it like the little tag with the product information, you could just flip it out, use it and then put it away. Or we could bring back wearing a hankerchief in the breast pocket, but instead have a micro-fiber cloth. ;)
May
16
comment Touch Screen Password Guessing by Fingerprint Trace
Nice to see someone already made the application I suggested in my answer. Will have to check it out.
May
16
comment Bot detecting by considering request inter-arrival time
@TildalWave - hmm, this is a tricky one, while I agree that it doesn't answer the asker's question directly, I also think the asker's question (as asked) is completely off topic for Sec.SE. (It's a programing question.) The offer of simpler detections and methods of detection is security related and useful information even if not a direct answer, but does offer an alternative. I guess put another way, the question is completely off topic and this answer is the most on-topic portion of the entire thing even if not an answer to the specific question, but an alternative.
May
16
comment Touch Screen Password Guessing by Fingerprint Trace
Thanks for sharing, it's always great to see how security can sometimes be defeated almost by accident.
May
15
comment Hack a LAN with low security
@user1181065 - If you need to write the software yourself, then you would need to write your own packet sniffer. Such topics are programming related (and fairly deeply so) and not security related though, so it would be off topic here. You might have better luck asking on StackOverflow for help with writing a packet sniffer. I would also suggest disclosing that it is looking for assistance on the direction to go with a school project.
May
15
comment Hack a LAN with low security
@user1181065 - as long as it is an official project, then I'd be less worried, particularly if you limit your sniffing to only a willing participant's system's traffic. It should be easy enough to apply a mac filter based on their mac address so that you capture only their traffic. Still might not be a bad idea to contact your school's helpdesk though and make sure they are aware of said project.
May
15
comment Hack a LAN with low security
What you are trying to do is a good way to get kicked out of school. It is almost certainly in violation of the terms of use you agreed to when getting access to the school network. There are better ways to bring problems to their attention than hacking it as a demonstration. In some jurisdictions, it may even be illegal. If you are going to do anything, I would suggest compromising your own connection and show them how you were able to detect your own files going across the network.
May
14
comment Database connection from front end
@MayankSharma - that's the client side. In my experience, front end generally refers to the logic that actually renders the HTML where as the back end is the "brains" of the site. The typical pattern is for a front end to request data from the back end via calls that can be swapped out to make it run off of any DB platform. So DB + DB layer is backend, HTML generation is front end and business logic can live in either, depending on approach.
May
8
comment What precaustions should be taken when the file displayed by a webpage is specified by the GET value
@Celeritas it's very good that you are seeking to make sure you do things securely early on though. It will be a great service to you as you develop your skills.
May
8
comment What precaustions should be taken when the file displayed by a webpage is specified by the GET value
Either one is really a simple viable option and will be a better starting point. The big trick is that if you open up more complex input, the escaping you need to do to prevent SQL injection becomes more complex. Note that this also would let you start doing interesting things like specifying which pages are public vs private and could be expanded to support a login pretty easily. (You just add a check of the permissions before PHP loads the page's contents.) If you wanted, you could even store the contents of the page in the DB, but that's getting more in to web design than security.
May
8
comment Is salting a hash really as secure as common knowledge implies?
@Kaz - yes, I'm not saying it is helpful in signature protection. I'm saying that a known constraint on the input makes a collision more difficult to find. You would have to make guesses for that value specifically as opposed to having the ability to use a collision discovered on trying to solve another record. For example if I discover that aousenfo resolves to a hash 1234567 of a record that has a salt of abcde, it may not be useful for that record, but I can't reuse that effort on any record that does have a hash of 1234567 because the input differs.
May
8
comment Is salting a hash really as secure as common knowledge implies?
@Schroeder - a valid point, I have updated it to clarify the finer points more quickly.
May
8
comment Is salting a hash really as secure as common knowledge implies?
@Kaz, I'm not sure that it is a problem for most password setups, but I know there have been weaknesses with injection of contents at the end of a file to make it match given hashes. Even if it is primarily a theoretical attack at the time as applied to a secure password hash, there is no guarantee it won't be an attack in the future and a salt does aid in protecting against it.
May
8
comment Is salting a hash really as secure as common knowledge implies?
@Kaz - hashing collisions are relevant in the other direction. Not for rainbow tables specifically, but if I find that hso8urn0 and password both resolve to a hash value of 12345678, then I can use hso8urn0 as the password. Since the salt is going to be added to my user input however, I have to find a collision that ends with the salt, which means the majority of possible collisions will no longer work.
May
8
comment Is salting a hash really as secure as common knowledge implies?
@schroeder - From a security perspective, a very long, very secure password is not going to be any easier to break than a simpler and salted password, at least as far as brute forcing is concerned. It offers a slight gain in terms of unconstrained input from a collision. That's why I said fundamentally correct. There are some intricacies that are gained, but the main point is extending the complexity to something that can't simply have all salt/password combinations built in to a rainbow table.