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Dec
11
comment Port Scan Detected and Blocked! - Bitdefender 2014
@user54791 that's assuming that the router is actually a NAT router and not just a basic network router. Depending on the type of router, it may just be putting them on the same network as his cable modem and his cable modem may just be handing direct IPs to each computer on the network.
Dec
8
comment generate certificate at runtime and validate
This is broken. Do not do this.
Dec
5
comment Since I can set the source IP address to anything using raw sockets, does this mean I am untraceable?
@Kevin - it isn't that large of a number of routers normally. It may travel through 10 to 15, but generally, at least 1/3 of those are on the ISP's network and another 1/3 or so on the recipient's ISP's network. The ones in between tend to be backbone networks, but they still care about entry and exit points on their network for traffic for billing and peering negotiations. They may or may not log every packet, but if they start noticing a weird pattern, they are likely to make note of it.
Dec
5
comment Does it matter which key is considered private and which public?
Can we add more clarification here about if this is talking specifically about RSA or about asymmetric crypto in general? It makes a huge and potentially catastrophic difference.
Dec
2
comment Do I have to hash users' IP addresses when I log them?
I would also add that storing the IPs in a "non-reversible" manner is counter productive as it prevents you from being able to track security threats against your site. If you don't have an accessible IP address in the log file, then you can't report relevant information in the case of an attack on your systems.
Nov
26
comment Are photographs of fingerprints a security risk?
@Josef - that's an interesting area of research, but it is still making some approximation guesses which could potentially throw off getting an accurate finger print reading. It would also have perspective issues to correct for and shaping issues in order to get a consistent finger print out of the video. It might be possible at some point in the future, but I'm still not particularly convinced that the state of the art could extract a usable print, at least for finger print systems with a low false positive rate. Other methods are certainly far easier to obtain prints.
Nov
24
comment Can a botnet be used to effectively break encryption keys?
@k1DBLITZ - when the times to crack are several orders of magnitude past the heat death of the universe, it doesn't practically matter. Every additional bit DOUBLES the time to crack, assuming there aren't flaws in the algorithm.
Nov
24
comment Are 2FA soft-tokens flawed if the user can log into the website from the same mobile device?
@nowen - fair enough.
Nov
21
comment Encrypted retrievable password
@MatthewPeters - fair enough, happens to us all.
Nov
21
comment Encrypted retrievable password
@BustedSanta, does the decrypted password need to be available offline (ie, when the user isn't logged in)?
Nov
21
comment Are 2FA soft-tokens flawed if the user can log into the website from the same mobile device?
@Nowen - oohhh, that's YOUR product that you handily didn't disclose your affiliation with in the comment. Please tell me you are at least using a randomized GUI pin entry that doesn't link to key press events so that it is protected against basic loggers. (Which would be the reason I put the (almost) in the above comment.) Otherwise, the feature is completely worthless (and actually a hindrance to users).
Nov
21
comment Are 2FA soft-tokens flawed if the user can log into the website from the same mobile device?
@Nowen - which would still be entered on a compromised device and thus provide 0 to almost 0 additional security. It only prevents a non-persistent remote exploit of the device, which is a very, very small use case of protection. More thoroughly, it only helps you when there isn't key logging on the device, in which case the password for the site wouldn't be compromised and the 2FA token compromise wouldn't matter. There is literally almost no situation (if any) that WiKID's password on the token helps anything.
Nov
17
comment Question regarding SSL / TLS / Certificates in general
Adding some clarification for you. Yes, check the main How does SSL/TLS work, but the AES identifies the actual symmetric key used, but that is established by a key exchange which occurs using the certificate. The certificate is what you were making in openssl.
Nov
17
comment Is it possible that authorities can't block a certain website
It wouldn't even be possible to tell who watched it if the stream is encrypted. Multicast streaming doesn't work over the open internet and I don't think TOR has support for it either, so you would need to establish a unique connection for each viewer and the encryption would make it impossible to checksum to identify content. You could possibly length match, but some basic padding on the stream would destroy that.
Nov
11
comment Security implications for email address and url changes?
Right, what kind of client are you viewing it in though?
Nov
7
comment Hashing a hard drive before shutdown
@Jonathan - yes, the OPs entire premise was to store the hash to a USB stick. Basically he wants to be able to have something small that he can keep with him to be able to verify that another drive hasn't been tampered with. Encryption is really irrelevant since he wants to assume that the key is compromised.
Nov
6
comment Hashing a hard drive before shutdown
HDDs have firmware that governs how they operate. Someone could flash an alternate firmware that would mask their changes and tweak data in flight after verification. This could allow them to, say, alter an executable being loaded to turn it in to a root kit that would alter the behavior of your mounting, so you'd have to be very careful of how you mounted to prevent tampering from the HDD firmware. I don't know of anything that handles this kind of threat model as most models are built around the idea that a lost key is a broken system, rendering most of these concerns far less necessary.
Nov
6
comment Hashing a hard drive before shutdown
@JayHolister - yeah, individual file hashes would work, but now you need a much larger amount of data on the USB stick and probably some specialized mounting to verify it. You also have to be careful with how you mount the drive to make sure that the attacker can't use it to launch any attack on your system that would allow it to mask changes they made.
Nov
6
comment What are the weaknesses of my authentication scheme?
@HadrienG. - ok, that looks like the ID of the phone itself. Note that you can deactivate, delete or change the label, you can't actually change the UUID. I wouldn't count on that for any security as it is shared by the device like candy if it is the number I think it is.
Nov
6
comment Key Management/storage system
Well that's unfortunate... I added a later paragraph with some ideas, but it's less than ideal.