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23584
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location Rensselaer, NY
age 31
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 20 hours ago

Oct
9
comment future of graphical password authentication
While I don't think the question is answerable in it's current form. I think it is important to point out that NO, WINDOWS 8.1 PHOTO PASSWORD ISN'T SECURE. It's horrible, horrifying, awful, stupid, don't use it, crazy insecure. You can't hash it and still get a reliable input and most people are going to actually draw on something in the image, which makes it FAR, FAR, FAR easier to break than even a fairly weak password. (Not to mention easier to shoulder surf.)
Oct
9
comment What actually happens in “low voltage fault attacks”
Yeah, if you could provide your own power supply or check on the power level in a way that it can't be tampered with without making it detectable, it would effectively counter the covert portion of this attack, though it wouldn't prevent the leakage, so it doesn't prevent the success of the attack, just allows for it to be detected. The more proper fix is to correct the faults in the algorithm that allow for the leakage (if possible).
Oct
9
comment How safe is it for an app to trust a click on a link in an email?
@ThoriumBR - the idea is that the token should be of limited usefulness. It shouldn't allow unlimited posting.
Sep
29
comment Now that CloudFlare offers potentially-insecure free SSL to all users, would a new HTTP header be useful?
@Dr.McKay - that's the thing though, the place to do that is in the certificate. If Cloudflare is putting up certificates that don't make the state of the connection clear, then they should be stripped of trust until they fix the problem, just like we'd strip any other major misbehaving CA of not behaving in a trustworthy manner. That is how the SSL system is designed to operated, we don't need some new solution to a problem that is already solved.
Sep
22
comment Task Manager and Keyloggers
@user2813274 - sure they can be made cheaply and are easily available, but the chances of someone actually encountering one are far FAR less likely than a software keylogger since they require physical access to the box to implement and most people don't merit that kind of targeted effort.
Sep
8
comment Can I scratch off the magnetic strip off a debit card to only allow chip and PIN?
@HocusPocus - actually, if it is demagnetized, the read head should get a bunch of nothing rather than an error. An error might still be magnetized with some information uncorrupted.
Aug
28
comment Good way to make a secure token for logged out users
Based on the scenario you describe, you are not actually using a logged out user, but rather a second login system with a cookie persisted session that doesn't actually require a login to start it.
Aug
26
comment Interesting security demos for beginners
While this may have the start of a "good subjective" question, I'm not sure it is quite tightly defined enough. In particular, the audience is still fairly broad and the goal relatively wide. Is there any way you might be able to narrow it down a bit? For example, what kind of interest are you trying to inspire?
Aug
23
comment Could a neighbour see my traffic when we have cable Internet?
@bobuhito - it depends on the type of network. Fiber to the neighborhood serves a larger number of customers per fiber line because it is using a coaxial distribution network. In fiber to the curb (what at least my local Road Runner uses), it is around 32 to 64 passively split fiber lines to one end point. Fiber to the premise (such as FIOS uses a similar split). This wikipedia article may be more helpful.
Aug
19
comment How can I prevent my database from being compromised if my CakePHP app is compromised?
@Dominicp yes, if you decrypt on the server then a persistent attack is still a problem, but it still prevents mass compromise of anything not accessed. If you really need Max security you could have decryption done client side but that'd be tricky.
Aug
18
comment Can we trust antivirus software?
@Agent_L - right, sorry if I wasn't clear, I wasn't disagreeing with you that a virus in a high privilege process isn't a bigger threat, but the question doesn't ask how much of a threat it is, it asks if we can trust AV software. There is no reason to suspect AV software any more than anything else, including the OS itself. I was just pointing out why I didn't mention your point in my answer.
Aug
15
comment How does iOS prevent unauthorised code from running?
@raz - sorry, I'm thinking as a developer where the OS itself is also an application of types. Beyond the kernel, most of the functionality is provided by applications that run as part of the OS, but any high privileged application could be used in theory. I switched it to use the term "high privileged code" to be more clear.
Aug
14
comment Fingerprinting the webpage content
If you are trying to do it without being noticed, that is almost impossible. If you want to do it in a way they can't work around, do something that it doesn't matter if they notice, just make it labor intensive to work around.
Aug
14
comment Can we trust antivirus software?
@Agent_L - they could have a more effective backdoor, but they aren't any more or less likely to have one.
Aug
12
comment What does one call the strategy of using “pre-password transforms” as passwords?
Google let me in is related to your google account as it is descriptive of it. You are trying to make easy to remember passwords in to something harder to recognize, but having it be harder to recognize is no more secure than the initial password is.
Aug
11
comment What does one call the strategy of using “pre-password transforms” as passwords?
@MarkC.Wallace - pretty sure it is more a class of things than a formal description. I've also heard "clever" password. They key is that it assumes that the user's system is smarter than what the attacker can reverse engineer, which is almost always a bad assumption and certainly not a reliable one.
Aug
11
comment What does one call the strategy of using “pre-password transforms” as passwords?
I have updated to include the names of the two things you seem to be describing, but there isn't an exact term because what you are talking about is universally considered a bad idea. Despite the fact you may not want to hear it, it is important to point out that these are bad ideas and thus it IS an important part of an answer.
Aug
11
comment What does one call the strategy of using “pre-password transforms” as passwords?
yes, but slow hashes don't protect against related passwords. If you had related passwords that you then ran through some convolution or hash, it is still trivial to guess the other inputs and test them. You don't have to try randomly, so the runtime doesn't matter. You are confusing finding random passwords with a rainbow table versus attacking a specific user across sites.
Aug
11
comment What does one call the strategy of using “pre-password transforms” as passwords?
if you are doing something that requires a computer to process it, then use a password manager and random passwords. If you are doing something that is remotely human readable, the algorithm is able to be reverse engineered. Also, we aren't talking about reversing a hash, we are talking about analysis of what is actually involved in producing it. Those are NOT the same question.
Aug
11
comment What does one call the strategy of using “pre-password transforms” as passwords?
I'd start with searching for "insecure". A consistent transform can still be universally broken by a mildly targeted attacker and is almost certainly highly vulnerable to things like frequency attacks, even by automated analysis. This is not a good idea. It may be a half measure better than using the same password, but not significantly.