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location Troy, NY
age 30
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen 11 hours ago

Aug
11
comment What does one call the strategy of using “pre-password transforms” as passwords?
I have updated to include the names of the two things you seem to be describing, but there isn't an exact term because what you are talking about is universally considered a bad idea. Despite the fact you may not want to hear it, it is important to point out that these are bad ideas and thus it IS an important part of an answer.
Aug
11
comment What does one call the strategy of using “pre-password transforms” as passwords?
yes, but slow hashes don't protect against related passwords. If you had related passwords that you then ran through some convolution or hash, it is still trivial to guess the other inputs and test them. You don't have to try randomly, so the runtime doesn't matter. You are confusing finding random passwords with a rainbow table versus attacking a specific user across sites.
Aug
11
comment What does one call the strategy of using “pre-password transforms” as passwords?
if you are doing something that requires a computer to process it, then use a password manager and random passwords. If you are doing something that is remotely human readable, the algorithm is able to be reverse engineered. Also, we aren't talking about reversing a hash, we are talking about analysis of what is actually involved in producing it. Those are NOT the same question.
Aug
11
comment What does one call the strategy of using “pre-password transforms” as passwords?
I'd start with searching for "insecure". A consistent transform can still be universally broken by a mildly targeted attacker and is almost certainly highly vulnerable to things like frequency attacks, even by automated analysis. This is not a good idea. It may be a half measure better than using the same password, but not significantly.
Aug
6
comment Is it safe to send clear usernames/passwords on a https connection to authenticate users?
@Falco - and a programming error could result in the hash being insecure too. You have to validate behavior of security related code, not just hope it works right. The more complexity you add to a system, the harder it is to validate and the more likely an error or vulnerability is to appear. You have to judge how much benefit you get for a given amount of additional effort. Eventually the added risk of error in implementation is not worth the minimal gain in added resistance.
Aug
5
comment Is it safe to send clear usernames/passwords on a https connection to authenticate users?
Password/hash conversation continued in chat.
Aug
5
comment Is it safe to send clear usernames/passwords on a https connection to authenticate users?
Ah yes, I always remember GET is a bad idea because it is visible on the client system and may end up in client history, but forget that servers may log the parameters too.
Aug
5
comment Can an individual get an extended validation certificate?
Section 8.5 of that document makes it even clearer. It lists the valid entities explicitly and an individual is not one of them.
Aug
5
comment Is it safe to send clear usernames/passwords on a https connection to authenticate users?
@CodesInChaos - yeah, if you are using a sufficinently large intermediate hash and are sure it behaves well (truly random distribution) then it should be ok as long as the initial hash is salted and takes long enough to force use of a full enumeration of the intermediate hash space (or at least near full.)
Aug
5
comment Is it safe to send clear usernames/passwords on a https connection to authenticate users?
@CodesInChaos - Because nothing client side is trusted. An attacker can skip the entire slow process by bypassing the client entirely. You need to make sure you can't build a rainbow table of cheap, fast hash values. It isn't feasible if you salt each and provided the intermediate hash is long enough. Otherwise, you just make a rainbow table of hash values which can be generated at a very, VERY fast rate if they are cheap.
Aug
5
comment Is it safe to send clear usernames/passwords on a https connection to authenticate users?
@CodesInChaos - I'd only go for it being slightly less bad. Even using a complex hash to make a "longer" input, it is only key extension and an attacker is going to be able to produce a lot of cheap hashes very easily. Practically, it might not matter if the client side hash output is long and there are no vulnerabilities in either hash that limit the expansion from simple values. It's also important to note that in such a case, you would need to salt both the client and server side hashes. I'm still a bit dubious of the cost vs the benefit though.
Aug
5
comment Is it safe to send clear usernames/passwords on a https connection to authenticate users?
@AndyBoura - if you are designing the system such that you can support client side hashing, you have control over the network and server behavior for parts that would have access to the clear text. True, you aren't harmed by hashing it on the client (other than lost time), just so long as you it doesn't significantly impact the amount of hashing you do on the server.
Jul
30
comment pci compliance and temporary files
@mic.sca - good question. I think technically it probably wouldn't be, but I'm not sure that a lot of people consider that risk. It is at least slightly harder to access in a virtual memory file since it is more buried than if it is in a temp file, but technically it could still be compromised by dumping the virtual memory file.
Jul
30
comment Drive-by download attacks: What can cause the file to be downloaded without interaction?
@begueradj - no worries. It really isn't necessary. I appreciate the thanks, but this wasn't all that hard of a question once I figured out what you were asking.
Jul
28
comment Drive-by download attacks: What can cause the file to be downloaded without interaction?
Let us continue this discussion in chat if you have further clarifications needed. (BTW, like the anti-spam feature in your profile.)
Jul
28
comment Drive-by download attacks: What can cause the file to be downloaded without interaction?
At most they may click a button to do something else on the site other than download and infect their system, but it may occur with or without any participation on their part. If the user is trying to download something, it is no longer a drive by download by definition.
Jul
28
comment Drive-by download attacks: What can cause the file to be downloaded without interaction?
@begueradj - not all downloads are active clicks. They can be embedded content such as flash apps or movies or whatever other content. It could also be Javascript capable of executing a download operation without a click via some exploit. The key thing of ANY drive by download is that you are not intentionally trying to download ANYTHING. The term "drive by download" is a reference to "drive by shootings" where someone is just walking along minding their own business at gets gunned down by a passing car. Same thing for a drive by download, the victim is just a bystander.
Jul
28
comment Drive-by download attacks: What can cause the file to be downloaded without interaction?
I'll repeat what Graham Hill pointed out, but add to it a bit. This question makes absolutely no sense at all. In both cases described in the article, you are not trying to download anything. The first case is talking about a malformed advertisement (often full screen over the content you are trying to access) that results in execution where it fools the browser in to thinking the click was a download verification, the other uses the website loading itself without any click being necessary at all.
Jul
27
comment Does a virus need to be clicked on to function?
@JamesSnell if it is in metasploit that alone would counter my question, assuming it allows arbitrary execution.
Jul
25
comment Single sign on - is this a secure way to log in?
Oh, I see, I misread your post. I'll update my answer momentarily.