709 reputation
1510
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Nov 16 at 6:53

I'm a computer security researcher. I have programming skills in C/C++, Java, Objective-C and PHP.


Nov
6
comment Attacking an office printer?
@GrahamHill I have no answer this and I'm surprised. This printer is managed by some other admins. I'm auditing the security of the network and haven't talked to them yet.
Nov
6
accepted Attacking an office printer?
Nov
6
comment Attacking an office printer?
Thanks for the answer. What you describe is good for an attacker who wants to misuse the printer itself. I'm in particular interested to see how an attacker can use the printer as a hop to attack other machines. This is very important at this point.
Nov
6
comment Attacking an office printer?
@Polynomial I'm scared about this. I have been trying to search around but couldn't find many useful info. I need to check how much my printer is capable to do to see if a relatively dangerous attack can succeed. I haven't been able to find much info about the OS or hardware specs for my printer. Will it allow for some privilege escalation? Is it running CUPS for ipp? I have no idea yet.
Nov
6
asked Attacking an office printer?
Oct
25
asked Why not buy cheap SSL certificates?
Oct
22
comment Experience with a recent DDoS attack on Apache
Yes I see the difficulty in DDoS problem when the traffic cannot be easily distinguished. Probably pattern recognition or anomaly detection tools will have a hard time. I think the best way to go is to design the system such that the attacks don't at least completely interrupt the service. Maybe having multiple servers with a load balancer can help.
Oct
22
comment Experience with a recent DDoS attack on Apache
@Polynomial in general I don't like the idea of sending my traffic to a third party for analysis and mitigation, though it's a nice feature.
Oct
22
asked Experience with a recent DDoS attack on Apache
Oct
6
answered Security Assessment vs. Risk Analysis
Oct
2
awarded  Supporter
Oct
2
comment How a malware executes remote payload
OK. So looks like utilizing mmap to load executable in a new process memory and executing it, without being detected on the file system or in the exec system call. Interesting one.
Oct
2
awarded  Scholar
Oct
2
awarded  Student
Oct
1
comment How a malware executes remote payload
I'm also adding dynamic class loading when the code is written in a language like Java. Using ClassLoader, the payload is retrieved over the network (and possibly stored as a class file) and then runs in the Java runtime environment.
Oct
1
comment How a malware executes remote payload
Yes right, I forgot this one. Passing it to an interpreter could be in many ways, through a pipe, calling the interpreter by invoking the shell using system(...), and perhaps by calling a shared library and feeding the code.
Oct
1
comment How a malware executes remote payload
So, given your list + fexecve(), we can summarize it by either opening a file, creating a pipe (also sort of a file), and loading the payload in an executable memory region.
Oct
1
accepted How a malware executes remote payload
Oct
1
asked How a malware executes remote payload