BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft
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  • 149 votes cast
Feb
4
answered Why are self signed certificates not trusted and is there a way to make them trusted?
Dec
9
comment Can any password hash ever be secure?
Interesting tidbit: If you had a computer which used the minimum amount of energy physically possible to flip a single bit, it would take you more energy than exists in the entire sun to build a counter that counts from 0 to 2^256. So we are not going to have computers that can brute-force a hash of that magnitude anytime soon.
Dec
3
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
3
reviewed Reject Why is Steam so insistent on security?
Dec
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
2
awarded  Yearling
Dec
2
revised Why is Steam so insistent on security?
added 4 characters in body
Dec
1
comment Why is Steam so insistent on security?
@Bobson: Because many accounts have credit-card and Paypal info saved. Also they can have Steam-wallet funds.
Dec
1
answered Why is Steam so insistent on security?
Sep
9
comment Can RAM retain data after removal?
possible duplicate of Recover the prior contents of RAM from a turned-off PC?
Sep
2
awarded  Student
Aug
31
awarded  Scholar
Aug
31
accepted How does LastPass know that Microsoft.com uses the password for Live.com?
Aug
31
comment How does LastPass know that Microsoft.com uses the password for Live.com?
@schroeder: Whether a question is "vendor support" or not shouldn't depend on the answer. The answer here happens to be "they hard-coded it," but I had no way of knowing that without knowing the answer. It could very easily have been an HTML or HTTP feature I wasn't aware of.
Aug
31
asked How does LastPass know that Microsoft.com uses the password for Live.com?
Aug
7
comment Why do phishing emails have spelling and grammar mistakes?
Yeah this is a nice thought, but I'm sure the grammar mistakes aren't that nefarious. English is a hard language, and it's not most people's first language.
Jul
16
comment Is it safe to send SSL certificates via email?
It's called the public key for a reason :)
Jul
13
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
11
comment Password rules: Should I disallow “leetspeak” dictionary passwords like XKCD's Tr0ub4dor&3
@JasonCoyne: I challenge your claim that "a length of 8 [..] will have the password cracked very easily." Say the user uses only upper- and -lower-case letters, no numbers or special characters. And say your PBKDF2 is set up so the server takes 0.3s to hash one password. And say the attackers have a botnet 1000x more powerful than your server. Then it will still take an attacker over an expected 250 years to brute-force that one user's password. Since you are salting, that's 250 years per user.
Jul
11
comment Password rules: Should I disallow “leetspeak” dictionary passwords like XKCD's Tr0ub4dor&3
@JasonCoyne: 16 letters is way too high for the average user. Make it more reasonable (7-8 letters) and use bcrypt with an extremely high number of rounds, if you're that worried about it. That way the general security rests on your shoulders, and can be increased later if necessary without inconveniencing the user.