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location California
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visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Jul 21 at 0:07

Mar
19
awarded  Yearling
Mar
18
answered Why do you need to encrypt symmetric key?
Mar
14
revised HIPAA Compliant App, using Encypted Core Data vs Core Data Attribute Encyption
reformatted
Mar
14
comment HIPAA Compliant App, using Encypted Core Data vs Core Data Attribute Encyption
You won't be able to use the UDID with iOS 7.
Mar
14
suggested suggested edit on HIPAA Compliant App, using Encypted Core Data vs Core Data Attribute Encyption
Mar
12
answered What's wrong with a website including a password in a confirmation email?
Feb
6
awarded  Commentator
Feb
6
comment Does Known plaintext attacks lead to exposure of the key?
That's the way I interpret the Wikipedia article. Now that you know what to search for ("known-plaintext attack"), you can do more research if you'd like to dig deeper.
Feb
6
comment Does Known plaintext attacks lead to exposure of the key?
It's funny that there are two answers here, one that says Yes, and one that says No, and both point to the same Wikipedia article. If you read to the end of the Wikipedia article, you'll see the answer: > Modern ciphers such as Advanced Encryption Standard are not currently > known to be susceptible to known-plaintext attacks.
Feb
6
comment Does Known plaintext attacks lead to exposure of the key?
If it takes longer than the remaining life of the universe, I'd say that the answer is No. In fact, if it takes longer than the lifetime of the codebreaker, the answer is No.
Feb
6
comment Does Known plaintext attacks lead to exposure of the key?
By the way you've worded the question, it sounds like you're thinking that there will be some kind of pattern in the encrypted data that the codebreaker could use to discover the key. However, you haven't place any constraints on the key. What if the key is randomly generated data that is the same length (or longer than) the original data? (I think the answer is No.)
Jan
28
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jan
28
answered Keeping TrueCrypt keyfiles in plain sight
Jan
6
comment If I use a good Master Password in Firefox, is security improved when I Remember Passwords instead of re-type?
It is also worth considering some other issues that you didn't raise, such as: if passwords are stored in the browser, what about: usability (for example, what about passwords for non-web purposes?) availability (for example, what if you switch to a different browser, machine, or Firefox profile?) In other words, even if the browser provides sufficient security, is this a good place to store your passwords?
Dec
5
answered Denial of service when uploading a file
Dec
5
comment Shared hosting vs VPS
One "weaker link" here is the security of your own software. What have you done to ensure that your software prevents unauthorized users from accessing private information?
Aug
29
comment Password Vault - Enterprise
There's a page on the KeePass site that discusses the multiple user scenario. Personally I'd be nervous using KeePass in multiple user mode unless there was just one person updating the database.
Jan
16
answered openssl: recover key and IV by passphrase
Dec
18
comment Is there value in storing passwords in their own table with encrypted or hashed keys?
You can't effectively go about encrypting or hashing key values because the output would be random. True for hashing, but encrypted keys would be unique.
Dec
15
awarded  Teacher