195 reputation
17
bio website
location Baltimore, MD
age 25
visits member for 1 years, 3 months
seen yesterday

I work with Java web technologies and I've worked with SharePoint, C#, and related technologies in the past. I love learning about security/networking topics and teaching others when I have the opportunity. But most of all, it seems like all of my reputation points go towards bounties, so I guess I ask a lot of tough questions :)


Mar
25
accepted Why does an nmap -sT scan show ports filtered but -sS shows ports closed
Mar
25
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
27
awarded  Scholar
Feb
27
comment nmap: why is it “silly” to combine OS finding option (-O) with bounce scan (-b)
Thank you for this answer. I apologize but I either didn't see it or didn't understand when I originally saw it. Anyway, it's accepted now.
Feb
27
accepted nmap: why is it “silly” to combine OS finding option (-O) with bounce scan (-b)
Nov
27
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
30
comment How to allow only the public key owner to submit requests to my site? And what is this type of security called?
I notice you keep using the term public key as if it's useful for authentication. It isn't because by definition it is public information. Only a private key can be used for authentication with any confidence whatsoever that it identifies a unique user. Look into PKI, digital certificates, asymmetric encryption, etc.
Apr
25
comment Why different key exhange techniques for ssl key exchange?
@EJP Why not just offer clarification? It is, after all, a help forum. Nobody cares how many years you spent on Usenet if you aren't willing to offer your knowledge HERE. This isn't 'other parts of the internet'. RTFM isn't an acceptable answer here.
Apr
23
comment Implication of URL injection in an URL shortener service
I don't think anyone is trivializing your problem or computer security in general. However very few people have a complete mastery of the field. You've made several edits to the question so many responders such as myself probably didn't understand your question.
Apr
9
comment Implication of URL injection in an URL shortener service
@Cedric Martin Well you're basically adding a String taken from an external service to your web page. So yes input sanitation is necessary as you seem to realize. That link shows how to do the proper input sanitation. Once you do that you're not vulnerable to XSS attacks, at least from that URL service. Defense in depth in this case just means verifying that you're actually receiving a URL, and that the URL shortener service response doesn't contain anything else. That's really all I know, anything else is outside my expertise. It seems like you have a good handle on it though, so good luck.
Apr
9
comment Implication of URL injection in an URL shortener service
I wouldn't bother throttling unless you see problems occurring. I suppose it would be vulnerable to XSS attacks. The URL returned by the shortener service could, in fact, be malicious scripts. So you have to do validation to ensure it's actually a URL that you received and not anything else. This might be helpful owasp.org/index.php/…
Apr
9
revised Implication of URL injection in an URL shortener service
added 400 characters in body
Apr
9
revised Implication of URL injection in an URL shortener service
added 400 characters in body
Apr
9
answered Implication of URL injection in an URL shortener service
Apr
9
comment snort ignores packets with matching src/dest IP address
Thanks for the info. It wasn't the case though. My pcap file is of a single capture. I ran tons of other tests, all of which worked. All tests were run one at a time (e.g. edit the rules file, take out the ones I'm not currently testing, then repeat). Packets were always matched properly except for this one rule, and it only ignored the packets with matching src and dst.
Apr
8
answered SSL: How to send generated client certificate from server to avoid MITM?
Apr
8
comment SSL: How to send generated client certificate from server to avoid MITM?
@lost_with_coding I have to add to Tom Leek's statement. What you should actually do is save the certificate in PKCS-12 file format. Also sign and encrypt this file and then send it to the client. You can use a web form over SSL to have the client choose the password for the PKCS file. Also, like Tom said, send it to the client over SSL as well. As a client you can be assured that there was no MITM attack because the certificate that you receive is properly signed by the expected CA.
Apr
7
comment Preventing a spoofing man in the middle attack?
@Griffin You can't spoof the certificate because it has a signature field. The signature field uses an algorithm. The value of the certificate signature would change if you changed any of the certificate's contents. You can validate the signature field using the public key of the signing entity (the CA). So it's not like you can spoof Verisign's certificates unless you somehow get access to their keys.
Apr
7
comment Does DNS pinning protect against all DNS rebinding attack?
Upvoted but also, because DNS pinning simply doesn't work at all as you can force the browser into making another DNS query, see my response. That's one area where Jackson et al. in my opinion are wrong, is their description of DNS pinning weaknesses.
Apr
7
awarded  Editor