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seen May 11 '11 at 5:30

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revised Password manager vs remembering passwords
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comment Password manager vs remembering passwords
+1 This is definitely true - the single point of failure, keys to the kingdom. If you are the sort of person who likes to keep all his eggs in one basket and watch that basket like a hawk, a password manager is probably for you. OTOH, if you are the sort of person who likes to guard against his own ineptitude by keeping his eggs in several poorly secured baskets, avoid password managers.
May
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comment Password manager vs remembering passwords
What does this actually buy you? It might be simpler just to set an auto-lock on your password manager along with one long and strong password you have memorized to prevent other people from having access, if that is what you are concerned about. If someone can determine the strong password to your PM, they have an automated means of determining it. And if they have enough savvy to log keystrokes, they have enough savvy to find a well-used login like FB, search the key log file for that login, examine whatever follows, and crack the elementary code.
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revised Password manager vs remembering passwords
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answered Password manager vs remembering passwords
Apr
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comment How do you manage security-related OCD (i.e. paranoia)?
+1 On the 100% security is impossible bit. I like the fact that you have pointed out to some actual methodologies for making the decisions. Thank you for that. I will have to research those and comment further. Thank you for your answer.
Apr
27
comment How do you manage security-related OCD (i.e. paranoia)?
@beth - This is a pretty good answer. I guess the difficulty lies in if you are creating a startup that will need to be very secure, but you are also underfunded. It is much easier to secure something well in the design phase rather than in after it has been implemented and the cash is trickling in (hopefully).
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revised How do you manage security-related OCD (i.e. paranoia)?
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Apr
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comment How do you manage security-related OCD (i.e. paranoia)?
@Avid: It was a joke? I got the impression he was mostly serious with a slight bit of whimsy. e.g. I don't really see the sense in some of the things, e.g. giving the kids smart cards. Also some of it is unrealistic; e.g. I've had to compromise by giving my 3yo a password that is short but not an actual word. ;) And thanks very much for the kudos.
Apr
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comment How do you manage security-related OCD (i.e. paranoia)?
@nealmcb: Thanks. :) I needed the TL;DR to get across that there are some rational reasons to take security seriously to the point of OCD. Glad you liked.
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revised How do you manage security-related OCD (i.e. paranoia)?
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revised How do you manage security-related OCD (i.e. paranoia)?
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