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Dec
4
revised Why is my Mac trying to connect to an http://akamai.com server
added 180 characters in body
Dec
4
answered Why is my Mac trying to connect to an http://akamai.com server
Dec
3
comment How is DDoS different from DRDoS?
@Ebenezar - Just to be a bit more pedantic, I would add to your phrase "DDOS is is making the server unavailable or denying the service to the users for a particular time [with requests coming from multiple sources, as opposed to a DoS, which usually means one source of attack]."
Dec
3
comment Token based authentication under http
any specific reason as to why not use SSL throughout the whole application? That would the best 'best-practice' in this scenario. Also make sure the cookie has the HttpOnly flag set and if you do go for SSL across the whole application, make sure you also use the 'secure' flag.
Nov
30
revised What to do when I found a spyware that my spouse has installed?
added 8 characters in body
Nov
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
28
revised What to do when I found a spyware that my spouse has installed?
added 1 characters in body
Nov
28
answered What to do when I found a spyware that my spouse has installed?
Nov
26
comment Pentesting Cleanup
@tuson You are welcome. I guess that's when social skills supersede technical skills; the deal is to make it look like you are there to help them avoid the worst in future. When people that have years experience in service delivery, and someone with less experience in that particular subject, but well versed in security comes along, that does tend to cause make their ego very sensitive. Just be friendly and reassure them of those main things: 1) explain why it is important to know if the file was theirs or a genuine breach; and 2) make them feel that you are not there to jeopardize their jobs.
Nov
26
revised Pentesting Cleanup
I could not confirm; so deleted the sentence.
Nov
26
comment Pentesting Cleanup
@tuson - That makes sense. So the big question seems to be whether you have had a breach or the file was placed by the testers. No doubt for me, I would firstly speak with the testers and get this straight. If they say they definitely did not put/use/see the file, then the company will most certainly have to raise a security incident on a need-to-know basis.
Nov
25
comment Security risks if a server in not supported anymore
@OptimusPrime That is a risk-based decision which depends on factors that only you can tell, such as budget, time, hassle and risk, which is very valid to a business. Just make sure your scanning software is updated regularly.
Nov
25
answered Pentesting Cleanup
Nov
22
comment Password Hashing add salt + pepper or is salt enough?
Good that Rook pointed out the flaw in Thomas' comment (thanks @Rook); still, I have upvoted the answer because the general idea makes sense, and that's what matters: I agree that complexity is security's enemy.
Nov
19
comment Strange Virus Infecting My Server
@Lucas Kauffman - any chance you could provide some pointers (papers) to this kind of malware, please?
Nov
15
comment Nmap reporting almost every port as open
@SonnyOrdell - First thing, perhaps would be a telnet against any one of such ports.
Nov
15
comment Key Management: storing encrypted key in database and decrypted key in session variable
I can't comment on the actual question, but one point deserves attention. You said: "There is no perceived threat from determined hackers as the data would have little value". This is not always true. If your server is located at a strategic position, compromising your server might be the easiest way to get to the intended one. Obviously you might know your environment and should be in position to ascertain whether this is the case or not.
Nov
8
comment How to deal with a hacked laptop that's being remotely monitored
@Raja Dey - after the re-installation, 1) make sure the first thing you do with your Ubuntu is to update and patch your system. 2) Do not open or use anything that this 'friend' has ever sent you. 3) Change your router's password, just in case. 4) Change all your passwords to services which you have logged using your home computer or home network. 5) Tell this person he is a worthless piece of <user-your-imagination> and don't ever trust him again.
Nov
6
comment Black-box fuzzing a TCP Port running an unknown applicaiton
"The Future of Protocol Reversing and Simulation Applied on ZeroAccess" on YouTube: youtube.com/watch?v=0DRuax76kek
Nov
5
comment Can I trust large companies like Google not to store failed password attempts?
+1 for the answer. I just disagree with the "there's no point of this question.". If there was no real point, and still you had answered, you could, perhaps, have come across as you only wanted upvotes, which I know it is not the case, as you are always very helpful. Plus, the real point of the question was the benefit we all had from reading your answer, since I probably would have not arrived at such a sensible conclusion myself.