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visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Nov 3 at 8:14

Nov
26
revised Pentesting Cleanup
I could not confirm; so deleted the sentence.
Nov
26
comment Pentesting Cleanup
@tuson - That makes sense. So the big question seems to be whether you have had a breach or the file was placed by the testers. No doubt for me, I would firstly speak with the testers and get this straight. If they say they definitely did not put/use/see the file, then the company will most certainly have to raise a security incident on a need-to-know basis.
Nov
25
comment Security risks if a server in not supported anymore
@OptimusPrime That is a risk-based decision which depends on factors that only you can tell, such as budget, time, hassle and risk, which is very valid to a business. Just make sure your scanning software is updated regularly.
Nov
25
answered Pentesting Cleanup
Nov
22
comment Password Hashing add salt + pepper or is salt enough?
Good that Rook pointed out the flaw in Thomas' comment (thanks @Rook); still, I have upvoted the answer because the general idea makes sense, and that's what matters: I agree that complexity is security's enemy.
Nov
19
comment Strange Virus Infecting My Server
@Lucas Kauffman - any chance you could provide some pointers (papers) to this kind of malware, please?
Nov
15
comment Nmap reporting almost every port as open
@SonnyOrdell - First thing, perhaps would be a telnet against any one of such ports.
Nov
15
comment Key Management: storing encrypted key in database and decrypted key in session variable
I can't comment on the actual question, but one point deserves attention. You said: "There is no perceived threat from determined hackers as the data would have little value". This is not always true. If your server is located at a strategic position, compromising your server might be the easiest way to get to the intended one. Obviously you might know your environment and should be in position to ascertain whether this is the case or not.
Nov
8
comment How to deal with a hacked laptop that's being remotely monitored
@Raja Dey - after the re-installation, 1) make sure the first thing you do with your Ubuntu is to update and patch your system. 2) Do not open or use anything that this 'friend' has ever sent you. 3) Change your router's password, just in case. 4) Change all your passwords to services which you have logged using your home computer or home network. 5) Tell this person he is a worthless piece of <user-your-imagination> and don't ever trust him again.
Nov
6
comment Black-box fuzzing a TCP Port running an unknown applicaiton
"The Future of Protocol Reversing and Simulation Applied on ZeroAccess" on YouTube: youtube.com/watch?v=0DRuax76kek
Nov
5
comment Can I trust large companies like Google not to store failed password attempts?
+1 for the answer. I just disagree with the "there's no point of this question.". If there was no real point, and still you had answered, you could, perhaps, have come across as you only wanted upvotes, which I know it is not the case, as you are always very helpful. Plus, the real point of the question was the benefit we all had from reading your answer, since I probably would have not arrived at such a sensible conclusion myself.
Oct
24
comment Is this a phishing attempt? if yes where to report?
understandably I can see your point; however, to quote Einstein: "Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."; plus if it is company's policy, just because we assume the person could not humanly be stupid enough to do that, does not mean we can go ahead and take matters onto our own hands. Also, assuming he did not this on purpose, after being told he might try and remove the exploit/virus/Trojan himself, hampering any potential forensic investigation.
Oct
24
comment Is this a phishing attempt? if yes where to report?
Reporting this to the coworker might not be a good approach: as yourself have pointed out, the coworker could be the responsible for this. According to many company's policies, this should be escalated to the Fraud/InfoSec departments if the company has these departments, or escalate it to a line manager.
Oct
24
comment What steps need to do to identify security hole
At the risk of being ultra-paranoid, creation/modification date/time are not enough, as they can also be manipulated.
Oct
24
comment How is time-based SQL injection different from other types of SQL injection?
@AviD♦ - really interesting answer; it made me realise two things: 1) that the concept is simple, but 2) that the real trick is in how we actually approach the problem. Very elegant answer; thank you: +1.
Oct
21
accepted Manual Checks for Signs of Infection on Windows 7
Oct
17
comment Manual Checks for Signs of Infection on Windows 7
+1; thank you. You were spot on the "pre-2008" part. I learned this "method" during the early years of XP. Still on this subject, you've mentioned that pre-2008, this method was "an acceptable forensic approach for a beginner to intermediate level". Still within the pre-2008 context, what were the advanced level's approach? Fancy EnCase forensics? Or was the advanced approach the basic wiping-and-rebuilding?
Oct
17
comment Manual Checks for Signs of Infection on Windows 7
Thanks for your answer: it seems to tie in with Adnan's too. +1 for the Safe Mode explanation. Could you please expand on this one? 'To be undetectable' while in Safe Mode?
Oct
16
comment How to secure my network, laptop, ipad and email accounts which are possibly hacked?
@Shams - What did you to ensure you were really talking to Yahoo! support? Where did you get their phone numbers from? At the risk of being ultra-paranoid, if you have searched for their phone numbers on the same potentially hacked computer, or even on a different computer but within the same network (e.g., your home network), you should not assume you are talking to the actual Yahoo! support team.
Oct
12
asked Manual Checks for Signs of Infection on Windows 7