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Jun
23
accepted Are LFI attacks possible (removing extension) in PHP 5.4.4+?
Jun
22
asked Are LFI attacks possible (removing extension) in PHP 5.4.4+?
May
28
awarded  Necromancer
Mar
17
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
20
awarded  Yearling
Jan
12
revised MS12-020: Remote Code Execution
deleted 2 characters in body
Jan
12
answered MS12-020: Remote Code Execution
Jan
9
answered “Safe” public WiFi
Dec
28
answered Wifi pineapple “Karma”
Dec
21
answered Cracking passwords after a patteren with ex. John
Nov
27
revised How much are 0-days worth?
added 615 characters in body
Nov
27
answered How much are 0-days worth?
Sep
24
awarded  Popular Question
May
8
comment how does a reflection attack work?
Awesome answer, thanks for the read.
May
2
answered Bruteforce on 10 characters length WPA2 password
Apr
19
comment How can Antivirus differentiate between a Trojan and a normal remote desktop application software?
To add to this, sometimes they may recognize common methods to try and hide from antivirus. If you had benign software, but wrapped it up in a way that virus's usually do, it may be flagged.
Apr
15
comment What is the distinguishing point between a script kiddie and a hacker?
While true - the question relates to the terms used to describe them, and specifically when does one transition into another. Your point of a more skilled attacker being more dangerous is self evident, it doesn't have any impact on whether they should be called a script kiddie or hacker.
Apr
15
answered What is the distinguishing point between a script kiddie and a hacker?
Apr
8
comment How does hashing work?
I'm not sure if you're saying "I thought they scrambled it randomly" as in you've learnt differently now, but just so you know it's definitely not the case! Hashing is not random, it's repeatable - but it's impossible to work backwards that's all. A SHA256 hash of the word 'cat' will always be the same 100% of the time. That's why we can use them reliably for passwords. If the hash produced a new value every time, and we could only compare against a previous hash value, we'd never know if the password was right or not! :D
Apr
7
comment How does hashing work?
As a tiny answer to Q(3) more specifically programs like oclHashcat try millions of hashes in a predetermined list in most cases. They never actually 'decrypt' the password (remember you can only decrypt encryption - hashing != encryption), but they know if they try a password and the resulting hash matches they one they have, it must have been the original password. I.e. They don't decrypt, they do trial and error millions of times a second to see if they can get a match. This is why it's also good for a hash to be slow.