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visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen Sep 18 at 0:53

May
8
comment how does a reflection attack work?
Awesome answer, thanks for the read.
Apr
19
comment How can Antivirus differentiate between a Trojan and a normal remote desktop application software?
To add to this, sometimes they may recognize common methods to try and hide from antivirus. If you had benign software, but wrapped it up in a way that virus's usually do, it may be flagged.
Apr
15
comment What is the distinguishing point between a script kiddie and a hacker?
While true - the question relates to the terms used to describe them, and specifically when does one transition into another. Your point of a more skilled attacker being more dangerous is self evident, it doesn't have any impact on whether they should be called a script kiddie or hacker.
Apr
8
comment How does hashing work?
I'm not sure if you're saying "I thought they scrambled it randomly" as in you've learnt differently now, but just so you know it's definitely not the case! Hashing is not random, it's repeatable - but it's impossible to work backwards that's all. A SHA256 hash of the word 'cat' will always be the same 100% of the time. That's why we can use them reliably for passwords. If the hash produced a new value every time, and we could only compare against a previous hash value, we'd never know if the password was right or not! :D
Apr
7
comment How does hashing work?
As a tiny answer to Q(3) more specifically programs like oclHashcat try millions of hashes in a predetermined list in most cases. They never actually 'decrypt' the password (remember you can only decrypt encryption - hashing != encryption), but they know if they try a password and the resulting hash matches they one they have, it must have been the original password. I.e. They don't decrypt, they do trial and error millions of times a second to see if they can get a match. This is why it's also good for a hash to be slow.
Mar
6
comment At what point does something count as 'security through obscurity'?
I don't mean to sound defensive, but would you argue the overhead of a different port really is significant? For a simple port change the avoid the vast majority of automated exploit scanners looking for misconfigurations. I'd say -p 2222 is not a significant overhead in any real sense.
Mar
5
comment Client-Side Hashing to decrease value of password guessing heuristics
tomshardware.com/reviews/wireless-security-hack,2981-8.html Obviously it's a lot easier to scale up with multiple GPU's also
Mar
5
comment Client-Side Hashing to decrease value of password guessing heuristics
Okay. From my understanding this is still a dictionary attack. Dictionary is a fancy way of saying "predefined list of possible passwords", regardless of how they were derived.
Mar
5
comment Client-Side Hashing to decrease value of password guessing heuristics
Forgive a hashing newbie, but what is "heuristics" in this context? Am I understanding you're simply saying you want to render dictionary attacks impractical?
Mar
3
comment What does -Pn option mean in nmap?
If you have questions ask here so anyone searching for the same answers can benefit.
Mar
1
comment What are the good resources for learning Metasploit?
+1 for the handbook, but I wouldn't call it basic :p
Feb
27
comment Affordable web application attack tools
Much appreciated, ill certainly check it out.
Feb
27
comment Affordable web application attack tools
Thank you for your response. While I appreciate the list of alternate tools for other functions of the burp suite, unfortunately it doesn't address as far as I can see the core function being asked about; intruder.
Feb
27
comment How do I find a target on the wired network, from an attack system on Wi-Fi?
I'm glad it worked for you, but I actually said -sn :P Lowercase n, -sn is a simple ping scan, it tries to ping all the clients in the IP range and simply lists those that responded. Much quicker than a port scan for simply discovering hosts.
Feb
26
comment How do I find a target on the wired network, from an attack system on Wi-Fi?
Uhh, I'm admittedly going off memory, but are you sure nmap only shows the wireless side? Assuming you have a subnet of 255.255.255.0 - IP range of 192.168.0.xx the ethernet clients should still be assigned IP's within this range. Ergo, they should be routable, ergo nmap -sn 192.168.0.* should reveal all the clients, wired and wireless. If it doesn't, can you "cheat" for the moment, get an IP of an ethernet client and post it here along with your wireless IP? Can you ping the ethernet client?
Feb
26
comment How do I find a target on the wired network, from an attack system on Wi-Fi?
Perhaps super users, but to clarify you're on WiFi, and you want to determine which clients are ethernet based and which are WiFi based on the same router you're connected to?
Feb
21
comment Ethernet security
@Terry True, however adding a Wifi hotspot component is a horrible idea if security is your primary goal. Plug it in via usb!
Feb
21
comment Ethernet security
Highly recommend against the Wifi component if you're after security but yes, you're right in that it's convinent for light use - the type the OP describes. Only downside is a little added expense, but if you're looking for a decent VPN anyway....
Feb
21
comment How genuine are password entropy calculations?
Excellent response and I think it addresses what I was getting at. To rephrase my question with my new understanding it was along the lines of "Why do discussions surrounding password entropy seemingly ignore the likelihood of the password generation process being selected?" My answer would now probably be we can only evaluate the knowns in the equation, and that's the password generation processes itself. The selection of that generation process adds its own entropy but as with most security we just base it off the assumption they know and evaluate the strength of the remaining section.
Feb
21
comment Ethernet security
For what you're referring to you have speed as in latency, and speed as in bandwidth. It terms of latency your ping times will typically increase a little, because instead of going directly to a requested IP you go via your VPN provider, wherever their gateway is located. This could be the other side of the country, or the other side of the world (useful for bypassing geo IP restrictions). In terms of bandwidth it depends on your provider. They typically you'll still be able to watch youtube etc fine, chat with the wife, but you might not get as fast downloads.