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awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
21
comment Is a biometric eye scan more secure than a multi-factor authentication
@Gudradain Both the biometrics and the token together establish identity; neither does on its own. The likelihood that both will be stolen is sufficiently low to ensure security. Whether you call the biometric component identification or authentication is immaterial, as it can't do either job on its own. On the backend, biometrics are poor at the job of account selection because they provide a fuzzy match, while other forms are strictly deterministic, hence the authentication/identification distinction as described. But if you want to switch them around, it's largely just semantics.
Aug
20
comment Is a biometric eye scan more secure than a multi-factor authentication
@Gudradain eh, no. Not buying it. Something you know is dramatically easier to steal than something like an iris scan. Fingerprint sensors are exceptional because you leave the traces everywhere, but they're explicitly and intentionally not relevant to this question. But it's easy to trick someone into revealing their password or surreptitiously gathering that information. Surreptitiously gathering an iris scan is significantly less probable, and reproducing it even more so - very nearly zero. Passwords are compromised far more often than eye scans.
Aug
20
answered Is a biometric eye scan more secure than a multi-factor authentication
Aug
17
answered Drawbacks to only using TLS 1.2 ciphers in OpenSSL
Aug
16
answered Why doesn't the OS give every application a secret password?
Aug
14
comment Is it possible for a phone to be transmitting even while turned off and the battery removed?
Clearly you're not being paranoid enough for this kind of question. What if there's another battery? You won't survive long in this spy vs spy industry unless you can think outside the... er... battery compartment.
Aug
14
answered What is the difference between a virus and a worm ?
Aug
13
answered Is it possible to USB whitelist in Linux?
Aug
10
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
8
comment Why does Google allow non-HTTPS searches?
Clearly the best way to find out why Google does something is to ask someone else.
Aug
4
comment How does DNSSec work? Are there known limitations or issues?
@StephenSchrauger ah, i misunderstood your comment. Yeah, i think that would be possible.
Aug
4
comment How does DNSSec work? Are there known limitations or issues?
@StephenSchrauger that would be possible, but it would require that the signing key be present on the DNS server. The protocol is designed intentionally such that signing happens offline and no sensitive information be present on the server. This is a main difference between DNSSEC and dnscurve, and is why DNSSEC is on the root servers while dnscurve never will be.
Aug
2
answered How to prevent BadUSB attacks on linux desktop
Jul
31
comment security reviews of third party code
Do you also audit the full operating system and server environment? After all, the system calls are third-party code that your software is using.
Jul
30
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
27
answered Are computers on same network as honeypot safe?
Jul
22
awarded  Great Answer
Jul
21
awarded  Announcer